Aman Banerji

The US economy suffers from a market power problem that has invaded many sectors, including health care, telecommunications, and technology. As firms become more powerful, they are able to profit by taking advantage of other economic stakeholders rather than growing the overall economic pie. Competition as America once knew it—firms working to provide better goods

Corporations today operate according to a model of corporate governance known as “shareholder primacy.” This theory claims that the purpose of a corporation is to generate returns for shareholders, and that decision-making should be focused on a singular goal: maximizing shareholder value. This single-minded focus—which often comes at the expense of investments in workers, innovation,

Banks today are increasingly consolidating branch locations, while also moving away from low-cost financial services to high-profit activities, leaving marginalized Americans underserved and left behind in today’s economy. Without access to basic banking services, such as checking and savings accounts or small loans, consumers are vulnerable
to a host of financial abuses. To foster a more

Workers are increasingly powerless in the 21st century economy. Working people have few rights on the job, corporations and wealthy individuals hold outsized influence in politics and policymaking, economic inequality is vast and deep, and economic mobility is out of reach for most. Most notably, the unionization rate—a key measure of worker voice and worker

Introduction On Tuesday, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC)—one of the nation’s banking regulators—announced that it will allow non-bank financial technology companies (fintechs) to apply for national bank status. This may sound like a plain-vanilla regulatory move, but it is a move in the wrong direction from regulation that would truly protect

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In a joint publication of the National Employment Law Project (NELP) and the Roosevelt Institute, Irene Tung and Katy Milani expose the extent of stock buyback spending across the U.S. economy from 2015 to 2017—finding that companies spent almost 60 percent of net profits on buybacks. At a time of growing economic inequality, with millions

The Financialization of Higher Education at Michigan State University is the latest report from Roosevelt’s Financialization of Higher Education project. To learn more about the project, click here. America’s higher educational institutions today are a far cry from the promise progressives have envisioned for higher education. Successful public higher educational institutions have, rightly so, been defined as

The George Washington University (GW) has a student health insurance problem. Annual insurance premiums for the university-sponsored student health insurance plan (SHIP) reached a five-year high of $4,103 for the 2017-18 policy year. This cost is exorbitantly high in comparison to similar plans offered by many other universities, discouraging students from enrolling in the school’s

In late fall of 2017, chancellors at four University of Tennessee (UT) system schools took bold action prioritizing the job security and voice of local constituents by rightly rejecting a state-level outsourcing contract to privatize the management of state facilities. The benefactor of the proposed deal—which was pushed heavily by Republican Governor Bill Haslam—was Jones

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“Higher education” is a vague term. It describes a sector that is hardly uniform, with over 4,000 degree-granting institutions eligible for federal funding but serious disparities among them. A college education from one of these institutions continues to serve as a prerequisite to moving up the income ladder in our narrative about economic mobility. Yet,

Education is the cornerstone of the American dream: Study hard, earn a degree, and your work will be rewarded. Lee Hall, a university professor who holds two law degrees, is still waiting for his rewards. Teaching five undergraduate and law school courses per semester, Hall makes an annual salary of $15,000—less than a pet-sitter, he

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In “The Threat of Privatization for the Emerging Generation” below, Roosevelt’s Joelle Gamble and Aman Banerji, document the rise of Privatization- the process through which basic public goods such as water, education, and energy, are sold off to the private sector in the name of efficiency and cost reduction for taxpayers. They argue that the

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Higher Education is in a state of crisis. And, the influence of the financial sector in higher education has worked to increase social and economic inequalities, instead of serving as the equalizer we have long imagined colleges to be. Financialization has a number of disturbing consequences for higher education, including increases in overall borrowing by colleges

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With the fall semester underway at American University in Washington, D.C., students are starting new classes, making new friends, and joining new clubs. Most of these students will pay over $43,000 this year in tuition and fees, and collectively their payments will account for nearly four-fifths of the school’s operating budget. But a sizable portion

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In the last two decades, Wall Street banks have lured seven of the eight largest universities in Michigan into complex and risky financial deals. Through these deals, each school continues to pay millions to banks in fees while students throughout the state watch their tuition bills rise. City workers have suffered the effects of predatory

Aman Banerji argues that the confluence of strong movements and a sense of collective responsibility has created an opportunity for criminal justice reform. We have a truly unique opportunity to rewrite the rules of criminal justice and transform the manner in which we view prisoners, treating them as citizens and human beings. The early ’70s

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Roosevelters weighed in on the first Democratic debate on #RooRxn last night. Today, Aman Banerji and Alan Smith of Roosevelt’s National Staff and Alyssa O’Brien of Roosevelt Northeast examine the issues the candidates missed. The first Democratic debate is in the books, and it was a welcome change of pace for those who, like the

Aman Banerji covers the implications of the Department of Justice’s report on racial profiling in Ferguson, Missouri. The Department of Justice’s findings and a slew of media coverage have focused on the Ferguson region and the county of St. Louis. Yet the trend of increasingly punitive and racially biased traffic stops demonstrated at the St.

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The Justice Department’s probe of Ferguson has revealed a troubling pattern of discrimination in traffic stops, but the problem doesn’t begin or end there. The initial findings from the Justice Department’s probe of the Ferguson, Missouri police department reveal a pattern of racial discrimination that is both broader than Ferguson and deeply rooted. Among the

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