Julie Margetta Morgan is a Fellow at the Roosevelt Institute. Julie most recently served as a Senior Program Officer at the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Prior to joining Gates, she was a senior policy advisor to Senator Elizabeth Warren, where she was responsible for developing and implementing policy proposals on a range of education issues, including student loan refinancing, college affordability, and student loan servicing reform. She previously served as Director of Postsecondary Access and Success at the Center for American Progress, and she holds a Ph.D. in higher education and a J.D. from Boston College.

Voters across the political spectrum want policymakers to enact anti-corruption legislation, and Democrats responded by making corruption a signature issue in the 2018 election. This month, they followed through on that promise by introducing the For the People Act, an ethics and government reform package. The bill is the first real movement in Congress on

To address the $1.5 trillion in outstanding student debt that is held by American borrowers today, it is vital to have a full debate about the costs and benefits of potential solutions. But this debate must be grounded in a solid understanding of the problem. David Leonhardt’s recent takedown of universal student-debt cancellation flows from

As tuition has risen over the last several decades in the U.S., student loan debt has ballooned. Despite growing debt loads, federal policy encourages the use of loans for financing higher education, based on the assumption that student debt supports increased postsecondary attainment—and, in turn, improved outcomes for individuals and our economy as a whole.

With $1.5 trillion in outstanding student debt, more than 8 million borrowers in default, and millions more delinquent on their repayments, the student loan system today is holding Americans back from economic opportunity and stability. Faced with such troubling trends, Department of Education Secretary Betsy DeVos should be focused on relieving these burdens for borrowers.

The student loan program today serves industry insiders over its core stakeholder: students. The government justifies bailing out these other participants—lenders, servicers, debt collectors, and even colleges—as being in the best interests of students, student loan borrowers, and taxpayers. These claims, however, do not hold up. In Who Pays? How Industry Insiders Rig the Student