Katie Kirchner is the National Director for the Roosevelt Network. An alumnus of the Network, Katie’s academic and professional experience has largely been focused on the intersection of sociology and education. As National Director, Katie is expanding the work on diversity, equity, and inclusion strategy with priorities for network growth and policy work through the management of Network team members. Previously at Roosevelt, Katie was a Program Manager for chapter growth and membership development where she managed the Student Leadership Team, 10 Ideas, the annual Hyde Park conference, and oversaw the national cohort of students who do organizing and base-building across the country.

Prior to joining Roosevelt, during college, Katie spent four years working with Kid Power, Inc., where her various roles included leading after-school and summer programming focused on civics education and nutrition and sustainability; served as the chapter head at Roosevelt @ American; and was a member of multiple campus organizing efforts including Education not Debt and Fossil Free AU. Katie has a BA in Public Communications and Urban Education Studies from American University.

In America, we are told that government is “of the people, by the people, for the people.”  But this has never been true for all people. Since our nation’s founding, communities across the country have been shut out of political institutions that are supposed to work for the public good. Without the voices of these

“The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams.” —Eleanor Roosevelt Fourteen years ago, a group of students recognized something important: who writes the rules matters. They dreamed of a world where voices from communities historically left out of the policy process would be instrumental in orchestrating their own futures. With

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Today, I am honored to step into the role of National Director of the Roosevelt Network. Nearly 15 years after the Network’s founding, we’re operating in a dysfunctional and chaotic political climate where the wealthiest and most privileged among us have consolidated power among themselves. As a result, we’re seeing the privatization of key public