As Vice President, Strategy and Policy for the Roosevelt Institute, Nell Abernathy manages strategy and research priorities for the think tank, and focuses her own work on U.S. economic issues, including financial regulation and the gig economy. While at Roosevelt, Nell developed and managed the Inequality Project led by Chief Economist Joseph Stiglitz, and co-authored Rewriting the Ruleswith Professor Stiglitz. She has also managed the Next American Economy project with Senior Fellow Bo Cutter, and the Financialization Project with Fellow Mike Konczal.

Prior to joining Roosevelt, Nell worked on political campaigns and in government for President Barack Obama, Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, and Los Angeles City Councilwoman Wendy Greuel. In addition, she worked as an economics reporter in emerging markets, including Nigeria, Ghana, Turkey, China and Abu Dhabi. She holds an MA in International Finance and Economic Policy from Columbia University, and a BA from Brown University. Follow her @nellabernathy.

Companies today are not working the way that most Americans, policymakers, or the media think that they do. To fight inequality, we need to rewrite the laws that guide corporations. We must first, however, change the way that people understand the role of the American firm in our economy and explore how we can deploy

Why This Matters is a series from Roosevelt staff connecting our individual work—from papers to reports and everything in between—to our broader vision of creating a better, more equitable economic and political system. This series will give readers the top takeaways from our latest writing and thinking, with a focus on why they matter as we

Presentation to the Congressional Antitrust Caucus, Panel Remarks February 16, 2018 Today, economists and average Americans are confused by the same puzzle: We see historically high corporate profits and low corporate investment. In a productive economy, high profits and low investment aren’t supposed to occur simultaneously. So how do we explain what is going on?

The growth of digitally mediated gig or “on-demand” work, such as driving for Uber or shopping for Instacart, has prompted a national conversation about how and when we work, how we are paid, and what obligations businesses and workers have to one another. The questions raised by on-demand work are, in fact, symptoms of much

Untamed: How to Check Corporate, Financial, and Monopoly Power outlines a policy agenda designed to rewrite the rules that shape the corporate and financial sectors and improve implementation and enforcement of existing regulations. This report, edited by Nell Abernathy, Mike Konczal, and Kathryn Milani, builds on recent analysis of economic inequality and on our 2015

Tagged under:

Despite some buzz about his proposals to raise taxes on hedge fund managers and to lower deductions, Jeb Bush’s tax plan is just another iteration of the same tired trickle-down policies conservatives have been pushing for decades. As our colleague Mike Konczal points out, removing the carried interest loophole is a good idea, but it

Conservatives who say getting a job is the answer to poverty fail to acknowledge the realities of low-income work. Les Misérables returned to Broadway last week, just in time for Victor Hugo’s tale of poverty and redemption to provide some context for thinking about the poverty report Rep. Paul Ryan released Monday. With a history

The Rediscovering Government Initiative takes a look back and a look ahead… The Bernard L. Schwartz Rediscovering Government Initiative had an active and rewarding second year. Our programs continue to be directed toward broadening the public discourse on the purposes of government, and in particular, countering the ideological anti-government attitudes that have so influenced discourse

Greg Gopman’s callous comments about San Francisco’s homeless demonstrate why we need government to support the most vulnerable Americans. So yet another Silicon Valley innovator is in trouble for publicly ranting about the horrifying experience of having to share San Francisco’s streets with our nation’s tired, poor, and huddled masses. Last week, AngelHack CEO Greg

Young people who aren’t in school or working aren’t beyond hope, but we need to invest more in the programs that will help them. The great recession has hit younger, less educated workers hardest, leaving 6.7 million young people between the ages of 16-24 out of work and out of school. These “Opportunity Youth” are