Todd N. Tucker is a Fellow and political scientist at the Roosevelt Institute. His research focuses on global economic governance, judicial politics, and the domestic implications of international trade, investment, and tax treaties.

A leading political economy scholar, Dr. Tucker has testified before legislatures and expert committees around the world. His writing has been featured in Politico, Time Magazine, Democracy Journal, the Financial Times, and the Washington Post, and he has made hundreds of media appearances, including in and on CNN, the New York Times, NPR, and the Wall Street Journal.

Dr. Tucker is author of Judge Knot: Politics and Development in International Investment Law (Anthem Press, 2018). His other academic work has been published in books and journals by Cambridge University Press, Oxford University Press, Brill Press, and Edward Elgar. Prior to his doctoral work, he led research on international issues for Public Citizen and worked as an analyst at the Center for Economic and Policy Research and the Center for Economic Justice. He was the principal investigator on several major grants, including from the Ford Foundation, Open Society Foundations, and Sloan Foundation, which supported his research on The Rise and Fall of Fast Track Trade Authority, a co-authored book exploring over 200 years of history of U.S. executive-congressional relations on trade. Additionally, he has authored over 60 major reports, including The Sustainable Equitable Trade Doctrine for Roosevelt.

A native of Louisville, Kentucky, Dr. Tucker received his B.A. from the George Washington University and his Ph.D. and M.Phil. from the University of Cambridge, where he was a Gates Scholar. He has taught at Johns Hopkins University and the University of New Hampshire. He lives in Washington, D.C. with his wife Heather, where he enjoys hiking, punk rock, and comedy.

Some of the most pressing challenges of our time—inequality and climate change—require bold proposals to set the United States and the world on a new trajectory. In Fixing the Senate: Equitable and Full Representation for the 21st Century, Roosevelt Fellow Todd N. Tucker explores five ways to realign the body with the functions it was

Over the weekend, the Trump administration announced plans to terminate the 1993 North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) to force a skeptical Congress to accept his repackaged 2.0 version. This risky gambit is based on a faulty premise: The executive branch lacks constitutional authority to roll back NAFTA’s implementing legislation. While the president can formally

The Supreme Court is facing a democracy deficit, where the number of justices and the length of their terms have created a Court that does not reflect the views of the American public. This point is underscored by the fact that four out of five members of the conservative majority were nominated by presidents who

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Is globalization good or bad for workers? One view sees it as an inevitable and desirable process of making economies more efficient: It may displace workers in the short run, but it has the potential to make them richer in the long run. Another view sees globalization as a net negative, leading to a loss

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Will the status-quo trade order survive, implode, or be reformed? From the campaign trail to his unrelenting tweets, President Trump has made clear that he thinks trade pacts are rigged against American interests, causing many to wonder about the fate of the liberal world order. Please join Roosevelt fellow and political scientist Todd N. Tucker and TIME Magazine’s Haley

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Last week, the Trump administration launched an unprecedented action to enforce the environmental rules in a trade agreement between the United States and Peru. According to the press release: “United States Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer today directed the United States Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to block future timber imports from a Peruvian exporter based on

As negotiators meet in Arlington this week to discuss the future of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), the Trump administration is again rattling nerves. While no formal proposal is publicly available, the U.S. Trade Representative is reportedly calling for stricter Buy America rules in government procurement, a five-year sunset clause (i.e. the agreement would not be renewed

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Boeing! Bombardier!! Bears!!!

From a casual look at today’s business headlines, you’d think the Commerce Department had declared war on the world. “The Commerce Department will slap stiff tariff on Bombardier’s new jet” “Bombardier hit with 219% duty on sale of jets to Delta Air Lines” “UK warns Boeing over Bombardier trade row” “Bombardier stock watchers bracing for

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Washington State workers got a Labor Day reprieve when the World Trade Organization sided with the U.S. over the state’s aircraft subsidies. But — after years of the U.S. trying to throw its weight around in the Geneva court — the result may be more mixed than it appears at first glance. What They Found Today’s decision reverses a

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On Monday, Congressional Democrats unveiled their Better Deal agenda to make “bold changes to our politics and our economy.” As my colleagues at Roosevelt have noted, the platform is strong on tackling anti-trust and monopoly power and on recognizing we are not yet back at true full employment. As the agenda acknowledges, there’s much left

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