The Blog of the Roosevelt Institute

The pharmaceutical industry isn’t working for most people in the US. Over 80 percent of Americans across the political spectrum believe that lowering drug costs should be a “top priority” for lawmakers and believe that prescription drug costs are “unreasonable.” This growing scrutiny presents an opportunity to question the ways that drug corporations run business, as

For nearly half of a century, America’s public corporations have been driven by a shareholder primacy approach to corporate governance, increasingly prioritizing shareholder payments over other, more productive uses of corporate resources. Over the same period, employee bargaining power has decreased and wages for nonexecutive workers have remained flat across sectors. In Ending Shareholder Primacy in Corporate Governance,

In America, we are told that government is “of the people, by the people, for the people.”  But this has never been true for all people. Since our nation’s founding, communities across the country have been shut out of political institutions that are supposed to work for the public good. Without the voices of these

Higher Education

The idea that higher education is an essential pathway to economic security, regardless of how much it costs, has been cemented into the public’s mind. We’ve been told that people need more education and that investment in higher education will pay off. Every day, individuals and families make decisions based on these beliefs. But the

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Democratic Accountability

The Roosevelt Institute believes that restoring our democracy goes hand in hand with reforming our economy. Currently, the wealthy and well-connected are able to buy influence over the policymaking process—stacking the deck against the rest of us. As a result, corruption in government stands in the way of addressing nearly every issue on the progressive

Labor and Wages

Workers today are increasingly powerless. A decades-long attack on unionization has eroded workers’ agency over their own economic lives. At the same time, employers have expanded their influence in the labor market, gaining the discretion to set wages and working conditions on their own terms without fear that workers could check their power by finding

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Corporate Power

Americans are increasingly aware that corporations aren’t working the way they should. Roosevelt Senior Economist Lenore Palladino explains: “Today’s corporations have retained their privileges and lost their public purpose. Corporate power should not [surpass] people power.” In a truly competitive economy, rules incentivize corporate behavior that promotes shared prosperity, including investments in better products, higher

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Voters across the political spectrum want policymakers to enact anti-corruption legislation, and Democrats responded by making corruption a signature issue in the 2018 election. This month, they followed through on that promise by introducing the For the People Act, an ethics and government reform package. The bill is the first real movement in Congress on

The United States has a labor monopsony problem. Though legal tools are already in place to combat monopsony, they have only been used against the most obvious forms of anticompetitive conduct like no-poaching agreements. More generally, there has been virtually no enforcement against abuses of monopsony power in labor markets. In a Roosevelt Institute working

With outstanding student debt at $1.5 trillion, policymakers and education providers are looking for ways to make college more affordable. Though many argue for enhanced public investment to reduce tuition, others are turning to debt alternatives like income share agreements (ISAs). Through these contracts, universities (often with funding from private investors) contribute to a student’s