Tweetstorm on Trade

It has been a big day for NAFTA 2.0, and not in good way.  Here’s more—adapted from a twitter thread—on developments of the last 24 hours – including Pence’s Canadian visit, Lighthizer’s submission of NAFTA text to Congress, and Trump’s impetuous launching of a trade offensive against Mexico… Pence’s Canada trip seemed like a desperate

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As of late, I’ve been doing my utmost to find the silver linings of an otherwise frightening, frustrating, and disappointing news cycle—a rather difficult task in this political moment. There’s the legal fight brewing over Roe v. Wade, and Emily Peck’s sobering piece in HuffPost on the economic peril faced by women—and especially women of

Some of the most pressing challenges of our time—inequality and climate change—require bold proposals to set the United States and the world on a new trajectory. In Fixing the Senate: Equitable and Full Representation for the 21st Century, Roosevelt Fellow Todd N. Tucker explores five ways to realign the body with the functions it was

Vox published an excellent discussion with economist Brad Delong where he makes the argument on why left-leaning neoliberals (who “use market means to social democratic ends when they are more effective, and they often are”) should be comfortable with the “baton rightly pass[ing] to our colleagues on our left. We are still here, but it

Corporate profits are at record highs and unemployment is below 5 percent, yet 40 percent of Americans say that they would not be able to meet a $400 emergency. For too long we’ve been guided by the 50-year-old myth that fewer regulations and lower taxes on corporations and the wealthy will lead to economic growth

Roosevelt Research Associate Adil Abdela and Fellow Marshall Steinbaum submitted a public comment to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), arguing against the preliminary approval of the Staples-Essendant merger. For more information on anticompetitive business practices see Powerless. For more information on a new standard for antitrust, see The Effective Competition Standard.

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Voters across the political spectrum want policymakers to enact anti-corruption legislation, and Democrats responded by making corruption a signature issue in the 2018 election. This month, they followed through on that promise by introducing the For the People Act, an ethics and government reform package. The bill is the first real movement in Congress on

Over the weekend, the Trump administration announced plans to terminate the 1993 North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) to force a skeptical Congress to accept his repackaged 2.0 version. This risky gambit is based on a faulty premise: The executive branch lacks constitutional authority to roll back NAFTA’s implementing legislation. While the president can formally

The Supreme Court is facing a democracy deficit, where the number of justices and the length of their terms have created a Court that does not reflect the views of the American public. This point is underscored by the fact that four out of five members of the conservative majority were nominated by presidents who

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In The Unsound Theory Behind the Consumer (and Total) Welfare Goal in Antitrust, a working paper for the Roosevelt Institute, University of Utah economics professor and antitrust scholar Mark Glick examines why the New Brandeisians are correct to reject the consumer welfare (CW) standard. Delving deeper—and pushing antitrust scholarship forward—he argues that the CW or total welfare standard was