Poll: Rewriting the Rules

poll

The American public wants candidates who embrace a comprehensive overhaul to get the economy working for all Americans again. 

Since its launch this spring, Rewriting the Rules of the American Economy has changed the economic and political debate in the country. As the 2016 election heats up, we wanted to be able to go to candidates with convincing evidence that the American public supports our narrative of the economy, our message and our policies to fix the economy.

We partnered with Democracy Corps to conduct focus groups and a national poll to test our economic policies against the mood of the electorate. The results are impressive, but the big takeaway is the American public wants a comprehensive overhaul of our economy and a progressive economic message incorporating financial reform tested better when compared to a mainstream economic message without financial reform and only small tweaks to the economy.

You can read our full memo, which includes a three-page summary, see all of the slides that analyze the poll, or read our two-page messaging memo. Here are the other key findings:

  • The core principles and rules in the Rewriting the Rules report have huge levels of intense support with the public. The public is ready for serious changes across a broad range of areas.
  • A progressive economic message incorporating financial reform tested better among key demographics like millennials, white working class women and minorities and increased engagement and interest in the election when compared to a mainstream economic message without financial reform and only small tweaks to the economy.
  • Trickle-down economics is viewed unfavorably by 45 percent of respondents, while only 21 percent view it favorably. The Roosevelt narrative of the economy defeats the conservative narrative by 12 points.
  • The competing Roosevelt and conservative messages, the ideological debate, and the comprehensive Rewriting the Rules policies increased engagement and interest in the election with the Rising American Electorate of racial minorities, unmarried women and Millennials who could comprise 55 percent of voters in 2016.
  • 83% of respondents, including 85% of independents and 67% of Republicans, said “requiring employers to provide employees with paid sick days and family leave to care for themselves or a loved one when needed and to ensure that women do not lose their jobs when they have a baby” would be effective at creating a better economy.
  • 77% of respondents agreed “our economy is weaker because everyone is focused on short-term gains, not long-term plans and investments”
  • 77% of respondents believe “restructuring the rules around CEO pay to reduce the incentives for CEOs to inflate stock prices for their own gain at the expense of the firm’s long term investment” would be effective at producing a better economy.