Our debate about what is possible in U.S. policy is severely constrained by the assumption that our public resources are scarce and already overspent, meaning we are not capable of the large-scale social investments needed to provide every American with income security and a dignified life. This assumption is misguided and false. Implementing tax policies

“Markets, States, and Institutions” highlights how our thinking about this subject has changed over the past third of a century; and to provide an overarching framework into which these changes can be placed—a framework that both helps explain why the approaches taken in the past have been less successful than was hoped in promoting development,

Designing the twenty-first-century welfare state is part of a broader debate redefining the role of the market, the state, and “civil society”—non-state forms of collective action. One of the tenets of the Reagan-Thatcher revolution was questioning the welfare state. Some worried that the financial burdens of the welfare state would drag down growth. Some worried

As every new parent knows or quickly finds out, children are expensive. With costs ranging from diapers to daycare, children can be a source of deep economic insecurity for low-income families, especially for women. President Trump’s childcare plan does nothing to alleviate the burdens of childcare on families across the country. The Dependent Care Savings

The tide of economic growth no longer lifts all boats. Half of Americans have seen no growth in their incomes since 1980. The government did very little to help those left behind the tide of rising economic inequality. Maybe it’s time to consider a fresh approach to creating economic opportunity – what if we all

The People’s Climate March in April reminds me how far we’ve come in understanding that climate change is deeply tied to another ominous 21st threat: economic and social inequality. Even in the U.S., one of the largest contributors of greenhouse gas emissions, we are beginning to recognize that there are and will be vast climate

The United States is currently facing two ominous threats: climate change and economic and social inequality. The climate movement has made enormous headway in highlighting the connections between the two, but we must go even deeper if we hope to make progress on both fronts. The objective of Boiling Points: The Inextricable Links Between Inequality

Originally published at Equitable Growth. “Equitable Growth in Conversation” is a recurring series where we talk with economists and other social scientists to help us better understand whether and how economic inequality affects economic growth and stability. In this installment, Equitable Growth’s Executive Director and Chief Economist Heather Boushey talks to Brad DeLong of the

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“It’s everything related to jobs… shipyards, ironworks, get them all jacked up. We’re just going to throw it up against the wall and see if it sticks.” -Donald Trump Amid discussion of the Trump administration’s plans for bringing back manufacturing, we should not lose sight of one of the best opportunities for job creation: investing

The following remarks were delivered to a congressional panel by Roosevelt Fellow and Senior Economist Marshall Steinbaum on March 22, 2017. Antitrust, and competition policy more broadly, is the classic intersectional economic policy issue of our time. The evidence of the current policy’s failure is all around us: long wait times, or no customer service

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