Corporate profits are at record highs and unemployment is below 5 percent, yet 40 percent of Americans say that they would not be able to meet a $400 emergency. For too long we’ve been guided by the 50-year-old myth that fewer regulations and lower taxes on corporations and the wealthy will lead to economic growth

Companies today are not working the way that most Americans, policymakers, or the media think that they do. To fight inequality, we need to rewrite the laws that guide corporations. We must first, however, change the way that people understand the role of the American firm in our economy and explore how we can deploy

Roosevelt Research Associate Adil Abdela and Fellow Marshall Steinbaum submitted a public comment to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), arguing against the preliminary approval of the Staples-Essendant merger. For more information on anticompetitive business practices see Powerless. For more information on a new standard for antitrust, see The Effective Competition Standard.

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The United States has a labor monopsony problem. Though legal tools are already in place to combat monopsony, they have only been used against the most obvious forms of anticompetitive conduct like no-poaching agreements. More generally, there has been virtually no enforcement against abuses of monopsony power in labor markets. In a Roosevelt Institute working

In partnership with the Economic Policy Institute, Roosevelt Research Associate Adil Abdela and Research Director and Fellow Marshall Steinbaum examine the impact of the proposed Sprint/T-Mobile merger on the labor market. Cutting the number of national players in the U.S. wireless industry from four to three, this move would escalate market power in the industry

During a time when Facebook is being used as a tool of genocide and ethnic cleansing, Amazon is striking deals with Apple to put iPhone refurbishers out of business, and Google is manipulating search results to promote its own products, it is still difficult to find a group of experts willing to admit that Big

In The Unsound Theory Behind the Consumer (and Total) Welfare Goal in Antitrust, a working paper for the Roosevelt Institute, University of Utah economics professor and antitrust scholar Mark Glick examines why the New Brandeisians are correct to reject the consumer welfare (CW) standard. Delving deeper—and pushing antitrust scholarship forward—he argues that the CW or total welfare standard was

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America’s failing antitrust system is, in large part, to blame for today’s market power problem. Lax antitrust law and enforcement have allowed troubling trends like corporate consolidation to remain unchallenged, further embedding our skewed economy. In highly consolidated markets, consumers have limited choice and little power to pick their price, quality, or provider for the

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: September 25, 2018 CONTACT: Mariam Ahmed, mariam.ahmed@berlinrosen.com   NEW REPORTS: REVIVING ANTITRUST FOR THE 21ST CENTURY ECONOMY Roosevelt Institute and Great Democracy Initiative Release Legislative Blueprint for Combating the Second Gilded Age   NEW YORK, NY – As concentrated corporate power threatens jobs and wages and worsens inequality, the Roosevelt Institute and

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The State of U.S. Antitrust Law

On Friday, September 21, Roosevelt Chief Economist Joseph E. Stiglitz provided opening remarks at the ongoing Federal Trade Commission (FTC) hearings regarding competition and consumer protection in the 21st century. Professor Stiglitz called for a new antitrust standard, as outlined in an upcoming report co-authored by Roosevelt Research Director and Fellow Marshall Steinbaum. Watch the keynote here and

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