It has been ten years since the financial crisis dealt the biggest blow to the world economy since the Great Depression. While growth has returned, and the jobmarket  has by now tightened—especially in the United States, where the crisis originated—the reverberations of the crisis continue to affect us in ways both large and small, both obvious

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We live in an increasingly post-cash world, but cashless comes at a cost. Merchants – the stores we rely on for everything from groceries to oil changes – pay more than $50 billion in fees to the credit card companies that finance consumer purchases. As a result, merchants have a considerable incentive to persuade customers

Economy

The American economy suffers from high inequality and low mobility. Wages have stagnated despite rising worker productivity. Our distorted tax code favors the wealthy while most Americans suffer under rising health care and education costs. Roosevelters support building strong, local economies that create vibrant communities with a key role for anchor institutions, and rebalancing the economy by

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What to Expect When Your Employees Are Expecting: Universal Paid Leave and Business in Washington, D.C. seeks to analyze how paid family/medical leave affected state economies in California and New Jersey, which established paid family leave programs in 2004 and 2009, respectively. The report combines empirical analysis of existing policy with primary sources through interviews

Catalyzing an Anchored Economy in DC

In this report, Roosevelt’s Emerging Fellow for Economic Development Zach Komes argues that African American–owned businesses located in low-income neighborhoods have yet to experience significant benefits from economic changes that have occurred over the last decade in the District of Columbia. Faced with limited access to contracting opportunities, capital, and technical assistance, Black-owned firms have seen limited revenue

 In this Report, Roosevelt Network’s Emerging Fellow for Equal Justice Andrew Lindsay recommends that Massachusetts pursue expanded community harm reduction pre-trial diversion programs as a means of reducing recidivism, new incarceration, and drug abuse through revisions to the JusticeReinvestment Act (S. 64/ H. 1429). This paper argues that current justice reinvestment strategies pay insufficient attention to the structural issues

The University of Michigan, as a public university, has an inherent responsibility to serve the interests of the community it represents. The institution purchases more than $1 billion of goods and services each year, and how the university chooses to spend that money shapes the structure and values of Ann Arbor and Southeastern Michigan as

At University of Michigan, Roosevelters are working with school administrators to develop procurement processes that provide opportunities for local, minority and women owned businesses. As a publicly-funded anchor institution with a budget of over $1 billion in goods and services each year, the university has the opportunity to ensure that these transactions help support the

Academics, concerned students, or our government is not deciding the future of our universities. In looking at who has the decision making power at large colleges and universities across the country it is clear that those who have the power to make decisions are never going to be affected by those decisions. When it comes

We need to start holding colleges accountable as anchor institutions that provide economic growth and stability to their communities. In recent weeks, the debate about holding colleges accountable has focused on schools’ responsibilities toward failing students, continuously rising tuition, and increasing student debt. What’s been overlooked is the role of colleges as a potential force