Only two countries in the world are not signatories of the Paris Agreement, an historic pledge by the world’s nations to work to cut greenhouse gas emissions. It seems very likely that this week the U.S. will add its name next to Nicaragua and Syria, when President Trump makes good on a campaign threat to

Energy & Environment

Climate change is an empirical fact. It poses a threat to human rights and exacerbates economic inequality. It has even been classified as a “threat multiplier” by the United States military. Aspects of this issue reach into nearly every policy issue we work on: the economy, foreign policy, health care and democracy. Climate change’s far-reaching

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In this Report, Emerging Fellow for Energy & Environment Eric Wolfert argues that Solar energy has the potential to solve many of the most pressing issues facing society today, mostnotably climate change and public health. However, purchasing solar panels is prohibitivelyexpensive to all but the affluent, and many are not aware of cheaper options such

Writing for the Baltimore Sun, Student Board of Advisors member Andrea Sosa of Roosevelt @ Goucher argues: As key participants in the climate change debate gather in Paris, they should consider how the issues they discuss affect people of color and whether the solutions they have proposed have done enough to balance out the injustices

Next week, global leaders in industry, government, and finance will descend on Paris for the 21st Conference of Parties (COP21) hosted by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). With a significant focus on private sector innovation, more than 25,000 delegates will aim to produce the first legally binding agreement on industrial greenhouse gas emissions, as well as financial incentives for more efficient models of sustainable growth. While it remains to be seen whether international leaders can achieve the lofty goal of legally binding yet ecologically sound carbon emission standards, what is clear is that UNFCCC forgot to invite an entire generation to this discussion table.

Writing for The Hill, chapter head at Roosevelt @ Denver Morgan Smith argues: Structuring effective policy requires us to stop willfully ignoring the facts. This does not mean we cannot be cautious about environmental policy choices, but it does mean we have to stop believing that the 2,000+ scientists from 195 countries who work on

In the wake of President Obama’s decision to reject the Keystone XL Pipeline, Emerging Fellow for Energy and Environment issued the following statement:                         Full text of statement below: President Obama’s decision to reject the Keystone XL Pipeline is a win for climate, agriculture,

Roosevelter, Elizabeth Chi (Cornell ’18) published an Op-ed in the Cornell daily sun advocating for Cornell President Elizabeth Garrett to take action on climate change. Therefore, the question is not whether Cornell should set an administrative precedent, but rather whether the fight against fossil fuel companies that exploit and pollute water and land resources from

Despite the incredible progress made in recent years toward mitigating global climate change, the politics of this issue in the United States are still sobering. As of January 2015, only half the members of the United States Senate even acknowledge the existence of anthropogenic climate change. For some, it even goes beyond rhetorical denial: Republican

On November 30, representatives of 196 nations will converge on Paris to discuss how best to move forward in combating climate change, with the ultimate goal of keeping global warming below 2 degrees Celsius. At the same time, thousands of STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) students throughout the United States will be preparing for