As of late, I’ve been doing my utmost to find the silver linings of an otherwise frightening, frustrating, and disappointing news cycle—a rather difficult task in this political moment. There’s the legal fight brewing over Roe v. Wade, and Emily Peck’s sobering piece in HuffPost on the economic peril faced by women—and especially women of

Each Saturday, a Roosevelt staff member will share 3-5 articles that they consider must-reads. This week, Roosevelt Fellow Katy Milani is reading Emily Stewart’s piece in Vox on the influence that Occupy Wall Street played in shaping progressives’ economic policy ideas, including free college, the $15 minimum wage, and efforts to combat climate change: “[T]oday,

Each Saturday, a Roosevelt staff member will share 3-5 articles that they consider must-reads. This week, Roosevelt Fellow Rakeen Mabud is reading a WaPo story on how women are transforming organized labor and a New York Times op-ed that shows how “racism eats wealth for breakfast.” Rakeen also shares the latest from The Nation’s Bryce

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Every year during Women’s History Month, we celebrate the strides that women have made throughout history. In the fight for dignity and equity on the job, the government played a crucial—albeit imperfect—role in ensuring that women today are better off than their sisters of past generations. Yet, workplace equality remains out of reach for many.

Some of the most pressing challenges of our time—inequality and climate change—require bold proposals to set the United States and the world on a new trajectory. In Fixing the Senate: Equitable and Full Representation for the 21st Century, Roosevelt Fellow Todd N. Tucker explores five ways to realign the body with the functions it was

Three years ago, I worked with Roosevelt Fellows and economists Darrick Hamilton and Sandy Darity to demonstrate how intergenerational transfers are central components of wealth building and integral to the persistence of racial wealth inequality. Using the metaphor Umbrellas Don’t Make it Rain, we attempted to flip the script on the traditional narrative that education and income alone are the key

Recently, The New York Times published a report about women who, while working in physically demanding jobs, lost their pregnancies after requests for less-strenuous assignments were denied. The profile is a tragic example of the steep toll levied on women, and particularly women of color, who face economic and social rules that are rigged against

In Left Behind: Snapshots from the 21st Century Labor Market, Roosevelt Program Director Rakeen Mabud and Program Associate Jess Forden explore today’s changing economy and the future of work through the lens of six occupations: carework, food service, manufacturing, mining, nursing, and trucking. Despite a seemingly robust and healthy economy, as indicated by headline measures

The Year of the Woman, Again

For Women’s Review of Books, Roosevelt Senior Fellow Ellen Chesler reviews International Women’s Year: The Greatest Consciousness-Raising Event in History. Authored by Duke University historian Jocelyn Olcott, International Women’s Year “adds substantially to the historiography of women on a global stage,” writes Chesler. By examining the first international conference of women, Olcott rectifies the event’s historically biased portrayal and champions it

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Increased monopsony in labor markets has allowed corporations to gain outsized power over individuals, leaving workers with less agency over the choices in their lives. Labor market monopsony refers to the concentration of employers and the resulting power they have to shape labor markets to their advantage. More concentration leads to fewer employers who offer