The pharmaceutical industry isn’t working for most people in the US. Over 80 percent of Americans across the political spectrum believe that lowering drug costs should be a “top priority” for lawmakers and believe that prescription drug costs are “unreasonable.” This growing scrutiny presents an opportunity to question the ways that drug corporations run business, as

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: February 21, 2019 CONTACT: Ariela Weinberger, aweinberger@rooseveltinstitute.org Kathy Mulady, k.mulady@peoplesaction.org   Creation of a Crisis: Why the Pharmaceutical Industry Chooses Profit Over People New issue brief explores how US policy choices have led to high drug prices, low health care investment, misaligned incentives, and escalating CEO pay across the pharmaceutical industry  

Recently, The New York Times published a report about women who, while working in physically demanding jobs, lost their pregnancies after requests for less-strenuous assignments were denied. The profile is a tragic example of the steep toll levied on women, and particularly women of color, who face economic and social rules that are rigged against

The George Washington University (GW) has a student health insurance problem. Annual insurance premiums for the university-sponsored student health insurance plan (SHIP) reached a five-year high of $4,103 for the 2017-18 policy year. This cost is exorbitantly high in comparison to similar plans offered by many other universities, discouraging students from enrolling in the school’s

Last week, Donald Trump’s chief of staff John Kelly lamented that the world has changed for women. “When I was a kid growing up, a lot of things were sacred in our country,” he said. “Women were sacred and looked upon with great honor. That’s obviously not the case anymore, as we see from recent

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Three weeks ago, the Trump administration weakened the rules that protect women, effective immediately. By rolling back birth control coverage provided by the Affordable Care Act, non-profit religious organizations, such as hospitals and higher education institutions, are now able to reject contraceptive coverage all together. As a result, students at universities like Loyola University-Chicago and Georgetown

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In 2010, the year President
 Obama signed the Affordable Care Act (ACA) into law, nearly
 50 million individuals in the United States
were uninsured—more than 16 percent
of the total population. Since then, the ACA has extended care to more than 20 million Americans. ACA repeal would hurt millions of people who now have access to health