Each Saturday, a Roosevelt staff member will share 3-5 articles that they consider must-reads. This week, Roosevelt Communications Director Kendra Bozarth is sharing an antitrust reading list and elevates the hidden rules of drug addiction. I recently finished Good and Mad by Rebecca Traister, which is fitting because I am definitely a woman signaling fury

Every year during Women’s History Month, we celebrate the strides that women have made throughout history. In the fight for dignity and equity on the job, the government played a crucial—albeit imperfect—role in ensuring that women today are better off than their sisters of past generations. Yet, workplace equality remains out of reach for many.

Three years ago, I worked with Roosevelt Fellows and economists Darrick Hamilton and Sandy Darity to demonstrate how intergenerational transfers are central components of wealth building and integral to the persistence of racial wealth inequality. Using the metaphor Umbrellas Don’t Make it Rain, we attempted to flip the script on the traditional narrative that education and income alone are the key

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: May 24, 2018 CONTACT: Jennifer Miller, jmiller@rooseveltinstitute.org   NEW ROOSEVELT INSTITUTE REPORT HIGHLIGHTS THE HARMFUL RACIAL IMPACTS OF THE GOP TAX LAW Latest Analysis From Leading Progressive Think Tank Argues Tax Overhaul ‘Preys Upon People of Color’   NEW YORK, NY — Earlier today, the Roosevelt Institute released its latest issue brief: Hidden

The federal tax code is one of the most powerful tools of economic policymaking, housing critical rules that govern our economy. As such, it is also home to a set of hidden racial rules that, through intention or neglect, provide opportunities to some communities and create barriers for others. The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act,

The Hidden Rules of Race shines an objective light on the discriminatory systems and structures that perpetuate disparities between black and white Americans. The authors’ call for a comprehensive reorientation of our perspective on economic and racial inequality is bold, timely, and deeply necessary for those of us who wish to build a more inclusive