The pharmaceutical industry isn’t working for most people in the US. Over 80 percent of Americans across the political spectrum believe that lowering drug costs should be a “top priority” for lawmakers and believe that prescription drug costs are “unreasonable.” This growing scrutiny presents an opportunity to question the ways that drug corporations run business, as

The United States has a labor monopsony problem. Though legal tools are already in place to combat monopsony, they have only been used against the most obvious forms of anticompetitive conduct like no-poaching agreements. More generally, there has been virtually no enforcement against abuses of monopsony power in labor markets. In a Roosevelt Institute working

In partnership with the Economic Policy Institute, Roosevelt Research Associate Adil Abdela and Research Director and Fellow Marshall Steinbaum examine the impact of the proposed Sprint/T-Mobile merger on the labor market. Cutting the number of national players in the U.S. wireless industry from four to three, this move would escalate market power in the industry

During a time when Facebook is being used as a tool of genocide and ethnic cleansing, Amazon is striking deals with Apple to put iPhone refurbishers out of business, and Google is manipulating search results to promote its own products, it is still difficult to find a group of experts willing to admit that Big

Last week, Senator Kamala Harris (D-CA) introduced a sweeping, bold economic policy idea: the LIFT the Middle Class Act. The LIFT (Livable Incomes for Families) Act would essentially be a dramatic expansion of the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), making it much larger and available to many more Americans. A few days later, the conservative

Since the 1970s, America’s antitrust policy regime has been weakening and market power has been on the rise. High market concentration—in which few firms compete in a given market—is one indicator of market power. From 1985 to 2017, the number of mergers completed annually rose from 2,308 to 15,361 (IMAA 2017). Recently, policymakers, academics, and

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: June 12 2018 CONTACT: Alexander Tucciarone, atucciarone@rooseveltinstitute.org, 516-263-9775   STATEMENT: THE ROOSEVELT INSTITUTE RESPONDS TO VERDICT IN AT&T-TIME WARNER MERGER TRIAL   NEW YORK, NY– In response to Judge Richard Leon’s verdict in the Department of Justice (DOJ) Antitrust Division’s lawsuit to block the merger of AT&T and Time Warner, Roosevelt Institute

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: April 26, 2018 CONTACT: Alexander Tucciarone, atucciarone@rooseveltinstitute.org, 516-263-9775   ROOSEVELT INSTITUTE ECONOMIST PRAISES NEW LEGISLATION TACKLING THE EXCESSIVE POWER OF MANAGEMENT IN THE LABOR MARKET Legislation Would Address the Ways Overly-Concentrated Labor Markets Harm Working People, Comes on Heels of New Roosevelt Institute Report on Market Power   NEW YORK, NY —

Since the 1970s, America’s antitrust policy regime has been weakening and market power has been on the rise. High market concentration—in which fewer firms exist in a given market—is one troubling symptom and cause of market power. From 1985 to 2017, we saw an increase in the annual number of mergers from 2,308 to 15,361.

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MEDIA ADVISORY: March 29, 2018 CONTACT: Alexander Tucciarone, atucciarone@rooseveltinstitute.org, 516-263-9775   New Report from the Roosevelt Institute: Rampant Market Power of Corporations Responsible for Rigging the Economy Against American Workers and Consumers, Harming Communities New York, NY — Earlier this week, the Roosevelt Institute released its latest report, Powerless: How Lax Antitrust and Concentrated Market Power Rig