FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: April 26, 2018 CONTACT: Alexander Tucciarone, atucciarone@rooseveltinstitute.org, 516-263-9775   ROOSEVELT INSTITUTE ECONOMIST PRAISES NEW LEGISLATION TACKLING THE EXCESSIVE POWER OF MANAGEMENT IN THE LABOR MARKET Legislation Would Address the Ways Overly-Concentrated Labor Markets Harm Working People, Comes on Heels of New Roosevelt Institute Report on Market Power   NEW YORK, NY —

Since the 1970s, America’s antitrust policy regime has been weakening and market power has been on the rise. High market concentration—in which fewer firms exist in a given market—is one troubling symptom and cause of market power. From 1985 to 2017, we saw an increase in the annual number of mergers from 2,308 to 15,361.

MEDIA ADVISORY: March 29, 2018 CONTACT: Alexander Tucciarone, atucciarone@rooseveltinstitute.org, 516-263-9775   New Report from the Roosevelt Institute: Rampant Market Power of Corporations Responsible for Rigging the Economy Against American Workers and Consumers, Harming Communities New York, NY — Earlier this week, the Roosevelt Institute released its latest report, Powerless: How Lax Antitrust and Concentrated Market Power Rig

Today, the Roosevelt Institute released Powerless: How Lax Antitrust and Concentrated Market Power Rig the Economy Against American Workers, Consumers, and Communities, a report I wrote with my colleagues Eric Harris Bernstein and John Sturm. In this report, we catalog the growing body of evidence that strongly supports our view that the economy is afflicted

As workers, as consumers, and as citizens, Americans are increasingly powerless in today’s economy. A 40-year assault on antitrust and competition policy—the laws and regulations meant to guard against the concentration of power in private hands—has tipped the economy in favor of powerful corporations and their shareholders. Under the false assumption that the unencumbered ambitions

Last week, a bipartisan group of senators voted to roll back regulations put in place in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis. Those regulations rewrote the rules of our banking system that had long prioritized profits over people—a system that for generations exploited and perpetuated racial inequities and ultimately foiled the financial wellbeing of

Presentation to the Congressional Antitrust Caucus, Panel Remarks February 16, 2018 Today, economists and average Americans are confused by the same puzzle: We see historically high corporate profits and low corporate investment. In a productive economy, high profits and low investment aren’t supposed to occur simultaneously. So how do we explain what is going on?

Labor economists have traditionally focused on worker-side characteristics, such as education, as the crucial causal variable for explaining outcomes like earnings, unemployment, and inequality. But that point of view depends on labor markets remaining competitive, so workers can earn their marginal product of labor—because if they earned less, they’d leave for another job. What a

There is much to be concerned about in America today: a growing political and economic divide, slowing growth, decreasing life expectancy, an epidemic of diseases of despair. The unhappiness that is apparent has taken an ugly turn, with an increase in protectionism and nativism. Trump’s diagnosis, which blames outsiders, is wrong, as are the prescriptions

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This is an edited version of his talk delivered at “Does America Have a Monopoly Problem,” co-hosted by the Roosevelt Institute and the George Washington Institute of Public Policy on September 25, 2017, in Washington, DC. The Nobel Prize winner argues that an economy dominated by large corporations has failed the many and enriched the