With outstanding student debt at $1.5 trillion, policymakers and education providers are looking for ways to make college more affordable. Though many argue for enhanced public investment to reduce tuition, others are turning to debt alternatives like income share agreements (ISAs). Through these contracts, universities (often with funding from private investors) contribute to a student’s

To address the $1.5 trillion in outstanding student debt that is held by American borrowers today, it is vital to have a full debate about the costs and benefits of potential solutions. But this debate must be grounded in a solid understanding of the problem. David Leonhardt’s recent takedown of universal student-debt cancellation flows from

Today’s $1.5 trillion student debt crisis is “crushing” American households, writes Noah Smith for Bloomberg. The U.S. student loan program is driven by commonplace assumptions that have cemented the idea that higher education is an essential pathway to economic security, regardless of how much it costs. Because media, economists, and borrowers themselves believe that more

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: October 16, 2018 CONTACT: Mariam Ahmed, mariam.ahmed@berlinrosen.com   NEW ROOSEVELT PAPER EXPOSES FLAWS IN CONVENTIONAL UNDERSTANDING OF STUDENT DEBT Higher education, labor experts show student debt drives systemic economic insecurity   NEW YORK, NY  – With total student debt in the U.S. reaching a record high of over $1.5 trillion, the Roosevelt

As tuition has risen over the last several decades in the U.S., student loan debt has ballooned. Despite growing debt loads, federal policy encourages the use of loans for financing higher education, based on the assumption that student debt supports increased postsecondary attainment—and, in turn, improved outcomes for individuals and our economy as a whole.

With $1.5 trillion in outstanding student debt, more than 8 million borrowers in default, and millions more delinquent on their repayments, the student loan system today is holding Americans back from economic opportunity and stability. Faced with such troubling trends, Department of Education Secretary Betsy DeVos should be focused on relieving these burdens for borrowers.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: JUNE 26 2018 CONTACT: Alexander Tucciarone, atucciarone@rooseveltinstitute.org, 516-263-9775   NEW REPORT: CORRUPTION FUELS THE STUDENT LOAN DEBT CRISIS Roosevelt Institute Higher Education Expert Identifies Outsized Power of Special Interests in America’s Staggering $1.5 Trillion Student Debt System   NEW YORK, NY – In its latest issue brief, Who Pays? How Industry Insiders Rig

The student loan program today serves industry insiders over its core stakeholder: students. The government justifies bailing out these other participants—lenders, servicers, debt collectors, and even colleges—as being in the best interests of students, student loan borrowers, and taxpayers. These claims, however, do not hold up. In Who Pays? How Industry Insiders Rig the Student

The Levy Institute recently released a research paper I co-wrote with Stephanie Kelton, Scott Fulwiler, and Catherine Ruetschlin that models the macroeconomic impact of cancelling all of the student debt that is currently outstanding in the United States—just over $1.4 trillion, held by between 40 and 50 million borrowers. The federal government would write off