Darrick Hamilton

Darrick Hamilton is the Executive Director of the Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity at The Ohio State University and a Fellow at the Roosevelt Institute. In addition, Professor Hamilton holds a primary faculty appointment in the John Glenn College of Public Affairs, with courtesy appointments in the departments of economics and sociology in the College of Arts and Sciences. Professor Hamilton is a pioneer and internationally recognized scholar in the field of stratification economics, which fuses social science methods to examine the causes, consequences and remedies of racial, gender, ethnic, tribal, nativity, etc. inequality in education, economic and health outcomes. This work involves crafting and implementing innovative routes and policies that break down social hierarchy, empower people, and move society towards greater equity, inclusion, and civic participation

Professor Hamilton was born and raised in the Bedford Stuyvesant section of Brooklyn, NY, and now resides in the Short North section of Columbus, OH. He is a graduate of Oberlin College and earned a Ph.D. in economics from the University of North Carolina. He is frequently cited in the media, consults with various public officials and serves as an advisor to/fellow with several non-profit and think tank organizations.

 

Darrick Hamilton in the News


Will We Face Depression-Era Job Losses? Let’s Not Find Out, New York Times

This is how economic pain is distributed in America, The Washington Post

Is It Race or Class? Darrick Hamilton Showed Bernie the Answer., Mother Jones

The US economy has been structured by rules that either privilege or exploit people based on their race. Our nation’s legacy of implicit and explicit racial exclusions continue to have a deep impact on who is able to meaningfully participate and profit in the current American economy and who is left behind. The racialized policy

The US needs an economy that is grounded in justice and morality, where everyone, free of undue resource constraints, can prosper. To achieve this, citizens ought to have universal access to economic rights, such as the right to employment, medical and health care, high-quality education, and sound banking and financial services. Currently, our system provides

America’s political landscape and economic thinking are shifting. The 2016 election—and the rise of powerful movements over the past decade—has shown us that Americans are calling for change. They want a diagnosis of our economy to help make sense of what’s gone wrong and to suggest ways to make things better. In New Rules for

Conversation and Cocktail Reception Join the Roosevelt Institute as we celebrate current Roosevelt fellow Darrick Hamilton and former Roosevelt fellow K. Sabeel Rahman as they take on leadership of two of the most important and dynamic organizations in today’s progressive infrastructure! We’ll hear from Rahman, the new president of Demos, and Hamilton, the incoming executive

The federal tax code is one of the most powerful tools of economic policymaking, housing critical rules that govern our economy. As such, it is also home to a set of hidden racial rules that, through intention or neglect, provide opportunities to some communities and create barriers for others. The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act,

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