Felicia Wong

Felicia Wong is the President and CEO of the Roosevelt Institute, a New York-based think tank and campus network that promotes a bold economic and political vision capable of bringing the ideals of Franklin and Eleanor into the 21st century. She helps lead the Roosevelt Institute's work on a rewriting the rules agenda, a comprehensive economic program and narrative that has become increasingly influential. She is the co-author of The Hidden Rules of Race: Barriers to an Inclusive Economy (Cambridge University Press, 2017) and her work has appeared in the New York Times, the Washington PostTimeDemocracy: A Journal of Ideas, and the Boston Review.

Felicia came to the Institute from the Democracy Alliance, and previously ran operations and product development at a venture-funded education services company. Her public service includes a White House Fellowship in the Office of the Attorney General and a political appointment in the Office of the Secretary of the Navy. She holds a Ph.D. in political science from the University of California, Berkeley. Her doctoral dissertation on the role of race and framing in K-12 public education politics received the 2000 American Political Science Association award in Race, Ethnicity, and Politics.

 

Felicia Wong in the News


The Post-Neoliberal World Is Already Here, Democracy Journal

Elizabeth Warren’s Policy Agenda Will Live On, The New Yorker

With a Uniquely Fragile Economy, Stimulus Is Not Enough, Boston Review

The United States is facing an unprecedented public health and economic crisis: over 82,000 dead, 20.5 million jobs lost in April, and a 15 percent unemployment rate. The scale and depth of the crisis are drawing parallels to World War II mobilization and the Great Depression. In fact, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and House

Something unprecedented has happened in recent weeks. The passage of the CARES Act—the largest stimulus package in American history—and broader debates about government spending, production, and health care have fundamentally shifted the political paradigm. As the coronavirus pandemic ravages an already fragile economy, consensus is building, even among the deficit scolds of 2008–2009, around the

COVID-19 represents both a public health emergency and an economic crisis. While federal, state, and local governments must take strong steps to stem the spread of the virus — from continuing to close schools, restaurants, and workplaces and limit the size of gatherings, to ensuring that everyone has access to health care and can be

Measured conventionally, very little about today’s politics makes sense. Many attempts to explain the chaos point to political partisanship or regional animosity, but we believe that the chaos is a sign of something deeper: the death of one worldview and the ascent of another. The neoliberal ideal—that markets would create both economic and political freedom

Progressing Ahead in 2019

Summers are never slow at Roosevelt, and now we’re gearing up for an even busier fall. At the top of our to-do list is explaining how and why the public sector must make big investments to tackle our nation’s toughest challenges; promoting our ideas to influence the Democratic presidential debate; and welcoming two new fellows

In today’s chaotic political environment, it’s hard to have a serious debate about economic policy, despite its deep and real impact on people’s lives. But we seem to be at a turning point as Americans look for credible answers to the economic insecurity so many of us feel. On November 13, join Roosevelt President and

Our colleagues at the Roosevelt Institute, together with the Levy Institute, just published an exciting new paper entitled, “Modeling the Macroeconomic Effects of a Universal Basic Income.” The paper takes a major step forward in answering an important question: How would a massive federal spending program like a “universal basic income” (UBI) affect economic growth

Rewrite the Racial Rules: Building an Inclusive American Economy argues that, in order to understand racial and economic inequality among black Americans, we must acknowledge the racial rules that undergird our economy and society. Those rules—laws, policies, institutions, regulations, and normative practices—are the driving force behind the patently unequal life chances and opportunities for too many individuals. In

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