Katie Kirchner

Katie Kirchner is the National Director for the Roosevelt Network. An alumnus of the Network, Katie’s academic and professional experience has largely been focused on the intersection of sociology and education. As National Director, Katie is expanding the work on diversity, equity, and inclusion strategy with priorities for network growth and policy work through the management of Network team members. Previously at Roosevelt, Katie was a Program Manager for chapter growth and membership development where she managed the Student Leadership Team, 10 Ideas, the annual Hyde Park conference, and oversaw the national cohort of students who do organizing and base-building across the country.

Prior to joining Roosevelt, during college, Katie spent four years working with Kid Power, Inc., where her various roles included leading after-school and summer programming focused on civics education and nutrition and sustainability; served as the chapter head at Roosevelt @ American; and was a member of multiple campus organizing efforts including Education not Debt and Fossil Free AU. Katie has a BA in Public Communications and Urban Education Studies from American University.

 

Katie Kirchner and the Roosevelt Network in the News


What to Know About Eleanor Roosevelt’s Radical Progressive Legacy, TeenVogue

Young people are being left out of coronavirus economic relief efforts. That could be a big problem., The Washington Post

Can Philanthropy Connect with Today’s Youth?Nonprofit Quarterly

Launching 10 Ideas 2020

Like much of this year, this launch of 10 Ideas feels unlike any other. Even before the coronavirus pandemic and economic crisis, we’ve been living in a moment eerily parallel to the time of FDR and Eleanor. Right-wing populism and oligarchy are on the rise around the globe, and vast inequality is entrenched in our

Young people and students have been on the frontlines of movements for social change throughout our country’s history. And over the last few days, young people have joined protestors, across age, race, and class, and flooded the streets to demand justice—for George Floyd, for Breonna Taylor, for the disproportionate number of Black lives lost to

During the past month, our colleagues have been sharing their analyses of the effects of COVID-19 on the economy. They’ve underscored the continued gender imbalance of labor, the racial injustice central to our economy, and the disparate impact the virus has had on different groups of our country, and they’ve provided key analysis of the

In response to the growing coronavirus crisis, states are stopping “nonessential” surgeries to ease the burden on hospitals and medical workers. While this is admirable in theory, conservatives at both the state and federal levels have capitalized on these legitimate efforts to protect our collective well-being by misclassifying critical care as “nonessential” and restricting the

“I understood that my responsibility as a student activist wasn’t simply to call attention to what was wrong but to work diligently to make it right. And I have tried to live that life, every day” —Stacey Abrams On Saturday, January 11th, Stacey Abrams shared her hopeful wisdom with over 100 Roosevelt Network students, alumni,

The climate crisis is happening now. Across the planet, our oceans are warming, our weather is more extreme, and natural disasters are more frequent and more severe. And it’s only going to get worse: The UN predicts that by 2040, increased coastal flooding will affect nearly 50 million people, and a “disproportionately rapid evacuation” of

“I look at the world differently since becoming a Roosevelter.” Last year at this time, Deondre Morris had just gotten his acceptance into the 2018-2019 Forge Fellowship, one of Roosevelt’s training programs that help community college and public university students across the Midwest and South develop organizing and policy leadership. Deondre was one of nine

President Franklin D. Roosevelt once said that “government is ourselves.” Throughout American democracy, however, far too many communities have been denied political power and have seen government power deployed against them. This reality has been made clear at the federal, state, and local levels through intensified anti-immigrant policies, attacks on reproductive care for women, a

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In America, we are told that government is “of the people, by the people, for the people.”  But this has never been true for all people. Since our nation’s founding, communities across the country have been shut out of political institutions that are supposed to work for the public good. Without the voices of these

“The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams.” —Eleanor Roosevelt Fourteen years ago, a group of students recognized something important: who writes the rules matters. They dreamed of a world where voices from communities historically left out of the policy process would be instrumental in orchestrating their own futures. With

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In today’s chaotic political environment, it’s hard to have a serious debate about economic policy, despite its deep and real impact on people’s lives. But we seem to be at a turning point as Americans look for credible answers to the economic insecurity so many of us feel. On November 13, join Roosevelt President and

Today, I am honored to step into the role of National Director of the Roosevelt Network. Nearly 15 years after the Network’s founding, we’re operating in a dysfunctional and chaotic political climate where the wealthiest and most privileged among us have consolidated power among themselves. As a result, we’re seeing the privatization of key public

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