Katy Milani

Katy Milani is a Director of Advocacy and Policy at the Roosevelt Institute where she works on economic and regulatory policy issues with a focus on banking and housing policy. She coauthored Untamed: How to Check Corporate, Financial and Monopoly Power. Prior to joining Roosevelt, she worked for New York City's Office of Management and Budget and in Washington as legislative fellow in the U.S. Senate. She holds a Master’s in Regulation from the London School of Economics and B.A. from the University of Colorado.

 

 

 

 

Katy Milani in the News


Pharmaceutical mergers and megamergers stifle innovationSTAT

Are Stock Buybacks Starving the Economy?The Atlantic

Tax the Patriarchy, The Atlantic

The coronavirus crisis is, first and foremost, a health crisis. The Trump administration’s failure to take the threat of COVID-19 seriously—and our systematic, decades-long decimation of our nation’s public health infrastructure—has turned what may have been a public health challenge into a crisis for our health care system. And one area where the failures of

Following a year-long congressional investigation into Wells Fargo’s egregious consumer abuses, lax corporate management, and toxic corporate culture, CEO Charles Scharf and Well Fargo’s board members will testify before the House Financial Service Committee this week. This hearing comes in the wake of a detailed report, written by the Financial Services Committee staff, exposing the

Over the last five decades, an empirical revolution in economics has undermined many of the assumptions of “neoliberalism,” the reigning approach to economic policy. Many of the guiding assumptions underlying neoliberal policymaking no longer speak to what is going on in the economy or our country more broadly. In “The Empirical Failures of Neoliberalism,” Roosevelt

At least a quarter of the 2.3 million incarcerated people in US are addicted to opioids. The fact that our criminal justice system does not routinely provide treatment for opioid withdrawal or treat addiction as a disease is at best wasteful and counterproductive. Harsh drug laws ensure that we continue to see addiction as a

Despite Big Pharma’s claim that high-cost medicines are the price society must pay for innovation, recent research provides ample evidence that overpriced medicines are not necessary for the industry to find cures or revolutionize. Rather, high-cost and low-quality medicines are the price patients pay for an industry that prioritizes profit-seeking over public health. Like all

Each Saturday, a Roosevelt staff member will share 3-5 articles that they consider must-reads. This week, Roosevelt Fellow Katy Milani is reading Emily Stewart’s piece in Vox on the influence that Occupy Wall Street played in shaping progressives’ economic policy ideas, including free college, the $15 minimum wage, and efforts to combat climate change: “[T]oday,

This blog post is based off of remarks given at “Wall Street and the Next Recession: Protecting Main Street in the Next Economic Downturn,” an event co-sponsored by Americans for Financial Reform and the Center for Popular Democracy at the US Senate. One thing is certain about markets: they go up and they go down.

The pharmaceutical industry isn’t working for most people in the US. Over 80 percent of Americans across the political spectrum believe that lowering drug costs should be a “top priority” for lawmakers and believe that prescription drug costs are “unreasonable.” This growing scrutiny presents an opportunity to question the ways that drug corporations run business, as

In a joint publication of the National Employment Law Project (NELP) and the Roosevelt Institute, Irene Tung and Katy Milani expose the extent of stock buyback spending across the U.S. economy from 2015 to 2017—finding that companies spent almost 60 percent of net profits on buybacks. At a time of growing economic inequality, with millions

Why This Matters is a series from Roosevelt staff connecting our individual work—from papers to reports and everything in between—to our broader vision of creating a better, more equitable economic and political system. This series will give readers the top takeaways from our latest writing and thinking, with a focus on why they matter as we

Why This Matters is a new series from Roosevelt staff connecting our individual work—from papers to reports and everything in between—to our broader vision of creating a better, more equitable economic and political system. This series will give readers the top takeaways from our latest writing and thinking, with a focus on why they matter

The agreement reached between Senate Banking Committee Chairman Mike Crapo and ten Senate Democrats is billed as a necessary technical fix to Dodd-Frank and regulatory relief for community banks. But this proposal would cause more harm than many—including some allies—currently believe. It would expose risk to mid-sized banks, threaten the stability of the financial industry,

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This post is based off remarks given at a House of Representatives briefing on the 2007-08 Financial Crisis and the current state of financial reform. There is ample media coverage and anecdotal claims from the banking industry that Dodd-Frank is bad for community banks. It’s politically challenging to counter this narrative because nearly every county

In response to the 2007-08 Financial Crisis that cost the United States more than $20 trillion, Congress passed the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act on July 21, 2010 with the aim of overhauling the dysfunctional regulatory regime. In the years since, the wide-reaching reforms mandated by Dodd-Frank have provided key protections to

Untamed: How to Check Corporate, Financial, and Monopoly Power outlines a policy agenda designed to rewrite the rules that shape the corporate and financial sectors and improve implementation and enforcement of existing regulations. This report, edited by Nell Abernathy, Mike Konczal, and Kathryn Milani, builds on recent analysis of economic inequality and on our 2015

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