Rachel Goldfarb

As economic inequality takes center stage in politics, it’s important to remember that reproductive justice and bodily autonomy are just as essential for secure lives. Yesterday’s 42nd anniversary of the Supreme Court’s Roe v. Wade decision prompted a week of stark contradictions. Thousands of anti-choice protesters descended on Washington yesterday while the House of Representatives

The initially available information about the president’s free community college proposal leaves questions about implementation and additional costs unanswered. This piece expands on an earlier piece published at EAB. The President’s proposal to make the first two years of community college free for students “who are willing to work for it” has generated tremendous buzz

After ten years of engaging young people in the political process, the Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network continues to push for a system that works for all of us. In an email to peers at Stanford University students on November 4, 2004, a student attempted to turn the tide on the malaise setting in after

Millennial’s rising preferences for artisanal, local, and genuine products must not minimize the importance of wage labor in the economy. In July, John Oliver’s Last Week Tonight summarized the state of the minimum wage debate in one grand old super-cut of sound bytes. To top off repeated invocations of “class war!” Senator Marco Rubio croons

Hospitals are buying private physician practices left and right, and state attorneys general should consider whether such mega-providers violate anti-trust laws. In 2002, only 22 percent of private physician practices were owned by hospitals. Today, this number has climbed to more than 50 percent, and 75 percent of newly hired physicians are entering the workforce

A little-known provision of the Higher Education Act which creates a federal obligation for colleges to help with voter registration could be a key for youth turnout efforts. After a disappointing election night, it’s time to start thinking about the effects of the collective decision our country has made. Despite the importance of Tuesday’s election

Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest. Frenzied Financialization (Washington Monthly) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal introduces the concept of financialization as a source of inequality, and lays out steps to reduce the financial sector’s size and power. Slow Growth and Inequality Are Political Choices. We Can

The Kansas Senate race could determine control of Congress – but there isn’t a Democrat involved. Read the other state-by-state analyses in this series here. Kansas is in the midst of not one, but two, close-call midterm races: the Senate race between Senator Pat Roberts (R) and Greg Orman (Independent), and the Governor’s race between Governor

While North Carolina’s Senate candidates agree on some issues, their views diverge dramatically on reproductive health care. Read the other state-by-state analyses in this series here. North Carolina Senator Kay Hagan (D) and Speaker of the North Carolina House Thom Tillis (R) are in a neck-and-neck race for that state’s Senate seat, and all eyes are watching

The Georgia senate candidates’ most interesting records on equal pay are in business, and they’re worth close attention. Read the other state-by-state analyses in this series here. Early observers pegged the Georgia midterm senate race as one to watch, and they’ve been spot on so far. Democratic challenger Michelle Nunn and Republican contender David Perdue – legacies

In the Wisconsin gubernatorial election, Medicaid coverage for 120,000 people hangs in the balance. Read the other state-by-state analyses in this series here. In the upcoming Wisconsin Governor’s election, which may very well turn on women’s votes, Governor Scott Walker (R) and Mary Burke (D) are vying to show women that they have their best interests in

In Colorado, the Senate race is particularly divided by issues of personhood and the minimum wage. Read the other state-by-state analyses in this series here. In September, a writer for the Denver Post accurately summed up the heated Colorado Senate race: “If Colorado’s U.S. Senate race were a movie, the set would be a gynecologist’s office,

It is likely that Ebola will be contained in the United States, but errors in Texas show we have room for improvement in responding to public health emergencies. On October 15, the second case of Ebola transmitted in the United States was confirmed in Texas between patient Thomas Eric Duncan and a health worker. Even more frightening,

The Texan legislature created a crisis of women’s health care with House Bill 2, and the latest decision from the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals will bring Texan women to the brink. Last night, a decision by the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals left Texas with no more than eight remaining abortion clinics. You would

The Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network’s Rethinking Communities initiative is emblematic of the model for democratic and economic reform needed in this New Gilded Age. As the latest Census report highlights, economic inequality continues to worsen. With a sluggish economic recovery, continued economic insecurity for many Americans, and ongoing political gridlock, it is increasingly clear

The Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network has nine years of success under its belt, and is ready for more in its tenth. “We know the old way of doing things isn’t going to cut it anymore. We want to pioneer a new process of civic engagement…” This is the opening line of the purpose statement

The Next American Economy project brought together 30 experts from various disciplines to envision tomorrow’s economic and political challenges and develop today’s solutions. Their assignment: be bold, and leave the conventional wisdom — and their own opinions — behind. In today’s video, Stefaan Verhulst of GovLab speculates on future municipal policy that allows cities to do more

The cost of sexual assault on college campuses far outweighs that of implementing bipartisan, comprehensive reform.   On August 13, I stood with Senator Gillibrand, Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer, and survivors, among others, at the Senator’s New York press conference on the Campus Accountability and Safety Act (CASA). Currently co-sponsored by a bipartisan group

Policies that strictly limit the use of suspension and expulsion in schools will help to close the racial education gap. Despite being ranked as one of the best states to live in, Minnesota still suffers from racial inequality. Even if laws and politics treat everyone equally, the educational experience is different for people of different

It’s commendable that colleges are stepping up to change their approach sexual assault, but they should be sure to center students in the process. Under increasing pressure from the White House, colleges and universities have been making changes in their approach to sexual assault. Following the release of an investigative report, the White House Task

Women are still lagging behind their male counterparts in the policy arena, and changing that requires engaging younger women. In recent years, several prominent women have replaced their male predecessors in top think tank leadership positions. Last year, Anne-Marie Slaughter replaced Steve Coll as president of the New America Foundation; in 2011, Neera Tanden took

Education Left Behind

Young people in Illinois recognize that many aspects of the state’s education system are broken, and they have some first steps for improving it. “Part of what is at risk is the promise first made on this continent: All, regardless of race or class or economic status, are entitled to a fair chance and to

A two-tiered pricing system would create dramatic inequality of access to a college education. A college education is believed to help those that sacrifice and pursue their education achieve a better life. However, the graduating class of 2014 is the most indebted class in history. Students will graduate this year owing an average of $33,000

The White House Summit on Working Families showed paths to creating change that work around a gridlocked Congress. On Monday, June 23, Roosevelt Institute Fellows and Campus Network members attended the White House Summit on Working Families in Washington, DC. The Summit, which was the culmination of months of town halls across the United States,

The Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network model of students creating policy change has impact beyond the college years. In 2004, when college students first started organizing under the Roosevelt name, I was still in elementary school. While they were busy working on national healthcare reform, I was busy watching The West Wing past my bedtime.

Earlier this summer, the Next American Economy project brought together 30 experts from various disciplines to envision tomorrow’s economic and political challenges and develop today’s solutions. Find out what they had to say. Participants in our recent convening speculated: “The post-WWII model of full-time, permanent employment proved itself the historical aberration we predicted: in 2040,

The Senate hearing for the Women’s Health Protection Act shows just how important it is for women’s health advocates to push for the facts. The propensity of anti-choice advocates to eulogize false science was on full display on Tuesday’s Senate hearing on the Women’s Health Protection Act (WHPA). That bill is a bold measure that

Learning loss during summer vacation is far worse for students of lower socioeconomic status, making low-cost and free educational summer programming essential. New York City public schools begin summer break today. For many students, summer is a time to rest, travel and play, and a recent study even demonstrates the critical role of play in

Spreading democracy abroad requires more than military power, as history has shown from the two World Wars. The very philosophy of the Axis powers is based on a profound contempt for the human race. If, in the formation of our future policy, we were guided by the same cynical contempt, then we should be surrendering

When doctors speak out about burnout, it creates an opportunity to create a more sustainable way to practice medicine. This fall, I will join about 17,000 students matriculating into medical colleges across America. For all of us, gaining admission to a medical school was at least a four year long process of first discerning –

The Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network’s 2014 Summer Academy Fellows have gathered for a summer of learning and growing together to solve today’s most pressing issues.   Inequality well may be the issue of our generation. The research, commentary, and policy debates are building across the country, from the depths of the ivory tower to

This post is the final in the Roosevelt Institute’s National Women’s Health Week series, which will address pressing issues affecting the health and economic security of women and families in the United States. Today, a close look at the state of Georgia, where the legislature is taking active steps against the Affordable Care Act. Georgia

This post is the third in the Roosevelt Institute’s National Women’s Health Week series, which will address pressing issues affecting the health and economic security of women and families in the United States. This post considers the problems created when judges accept misinformation about certain kinds of birth control as fact in the courtroom. In

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Vermont to Set Highest State Minimum Wage in the U.S. (MSNBC) Ned Resnikoff reports that the Vermont legislature has voted to raise the state’s minimum wage to $10.50 an hour, and the governor is expected to sign the bill soon. I Like Jane Austen’s Novels, But

This post is the second in the Roosevelt Institute’s National Women’s Health Week series, which will address pressing issues affecting the health and economic security of women and families in the United States. Today, a suggestion for how the White House’s Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault could use research to strengthen prevention

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. How the Right Wing is Killing Women (Robert Reich) Robert Reich uses Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Ellen Chelser and Fellow Andrea Flynn’s paper on poverty and family planning to explain how conservative policy is increasing maternal mortality. Roosevelt Take: Andrea Flynn also writes about The Lancet‘s findings

If the United States wants to maintain influence in the conflicted Middle East and legitimacy in the international arena, it’s time to open up to diplomatic relationships with Iran. With many states in the Middle East still politically torn, economically disadvantaged, and serving as hotbeds of extremism in the wake of the Arab Spring, Iran has come

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Did Obama Make a Mistake by Touting Solar Power at Walmart? (All In with Chris Hayes) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Dorian Warren says this speech rewarded a company that is failing on the environment and on inequality, which makes it a confusing political choice. Thousands in Pierce

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Now That’s Rich (NYT) With so much wealth now concentrated among a small financial elite, writes Paul Krugman, we should set aside fears that higher taxes would punish workers and job creators. Roosevelt Take: Roosevelt Institute Chief Economist Joseph Stiglitz spoke to the Senate Budget Committee

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Bernie Sanders Asks Fed Chair Whether the US Is an Oligarchy (The Nation) John Nichols says Yellen did not directly answer the senator’s question, but she expressed concerns about growing inequality and how it shapes participation in democracy. Yellen Won’t Be Pinned Down on Plans (NYT)

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. The Most Popular Tax in History Has Real Momentum (The Nation) Katrina vanden Heuvel, a member of the Roosevelt Institute’s Board of Directors, says that if Europe’s “Robin Hood” tax is successfully implemented, it could boost efforts to implement a financial transactions tax in the U.S.

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Is Net Neutrality Dead? (Bill Moyers) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Susan Crawford says FCC chairman Tom Wheeler is prioritizing political expediency over a real solution to the problem of net neutrality, such as declaring the Internet a utility. Is Everyone a Little Bit Racist? (All In with

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. We Read Seven Thomas Piketty Think-Pieces For You (The Brian Lehrer Show) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal joins Brian Lehrer to explore some notable responses to Capital in the 21st Century, from the Financial Times to Esquire to Mike’s own piece in the Boston Review. Poll: Americans feel

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Studying the Rich (Boston Review) In his review of Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the 21st Century, Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal says the wealthy worry about their place in society because they’re no longer just a model of success: they’re a research question to study. Fight

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. The Breakdown of Democracy (Real News Network) Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Rob Johnson says that to fix our democratic system, corporations need to be taken out of the game. Substantial reforms will be needed to limit their power in elections. Recovery Has Created Far More Low-Wage

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. In Florida Tomato Fields, a Penny Buys Progress (NYT) The Coalition of Immokalee Workers has done incredible work to improve labor conditions in Florida’s tomato fields, says Steven Greenhouse, but bringing Walmart into the fold might be its biggest win yet. Roosevelt Take: The Roosevelt Institute

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Colleges, Employers Rethink Internship Policies (WSJ) Rachel Feintzeig and Melissa Korn report that while unpaid internship lawsuits work through the courts, many companies are changing their programs by adding pay or eliminating internships altogether. Losing Their Unemployment Benefits Didn’t Help These People Find Work (HuffPo) Sam

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Ted Cruz’s Worst Nightmare Is Coming True (Politico) As Americans get used to having access to affordable health care, repeal will become less and less likely, writes Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Richard Kirsch. That’s just as Senator Cruz predicted last summer. AT&T Tries to Bully the

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Raising Taxes on Corporations that Pay Their CEOs Royally and Treat Their Workers Like Serfs (Robert Reich) Robert Reich explains a proposed bill in California that would incentivize lower executive pay by tying corporate tax rates to the ratio of CEO pay to typical workers’ pay.

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Minimum Wage Debate Goes Local (San Francisco Chronicle) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Annette Bernhardt and Ken Jacobs consider why the minimum wage debate has such momentum at a local level. They see this as a return to states and cities being laboratories of policy innovation. The Link

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. We Built This Country on Inequality (The Nation) Mychal Denzel Smith writes that the U.S. economy was built on a foundation of inequality for women and racial minorities, and that we must fight racism and sexism if we hope to close the wealth gap. Oklahoma Governor

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Government by the Few (All In with Chris Hayes) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Dorian Warren notes that we now have social science data that proves Occupy was right: our democracy is dominated by the wealthiest Americans. Happy Tax Day (The New Yorker) Benjamin Soskis examines America’s esteem

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. MBAs Will Turn Brownfields Into Green—if Investors Help Them Out (Quartz) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Georgia Levenson Keohane writes that the social venture competitions becoming common in MBA programs could push sustainability and social change, if Wall Street will fund the proposals. Even As Jobs Numbers Seem

Instead of giving up of Social Security, Millennials should push an easy fix for the so-called funding crisis: lifting the earnings cap. As a public policy student, I’m used to hearing lively debates and diverse perspectives from my professors, fellows students, and course materials. There is one issue on which they consistently agree: apparently, Social

Lawsuits show that the fight against wage theft is heating up, but workers shouldn’t have to sue their employers to get paid what they’re owed. Despite the extensive press coverage of the fight of fast-food workers for a $15 hourly wage, one recent development hasn’t gotten much attention: fast food workers around the country have

We Need More Nuance from the CBO

The CBO’s insistence on presenting just a single number makes its predictions misleading, and sometimes even useless. I have long thought we need two Congressional Budget Offices, the current one and a real one. The problem with the current “bi-partisan” CBO is again apparent in the wake of its claims about the impact of the

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Students Rethink How to Build Community (The Nation) Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network Senior Fellow for Equal Justice Erik Lampmann explains how the Campus Network’s new Rethinking Communities initiative, which is evaluating institutions like universities on their local impact, could build a more equitable economy for

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. What’s the Deal: What’s Next for Financial Reform (YouTube) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal talks about what the Dodd-Frank financial reform law accomplished, what still needs to be done to change the system, and why there are reasons for reformers to be optimistic about the future.

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. The President and Inequality (All In with Chris Hayes) Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow and Chief Economist Joseph Stiglitz discusses the place of inequality in this week’s State of the Union address, and the deeper question of why we don’t implement the economic policies that would absolutely

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Left Jab Radio (Sirius XM) Jon Aberman and Mark Walsh speak with Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow and Director of the Bernard L. Schwartz Rediscovering Government Initiative Jeff Madrick about technological innovation that doesn’t lead to productivity increases, the jobs emergency, and how to make the U.S.

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Occupy the Minimum Wage: Will Young People Restore the Strength of Unions? (The Guardian) Rose Hackman speaks to Roosevelt Institute Fellow Annette Bernhardt and Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network member David Meni about young people’s growing involvement in the labor movement. Hackman says Millennial support of

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. There Is Still Hope For Net Neutrality, Telecommunications Policy Expert Says (The Kathleen Dunn Show) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Susan Crawford says that in order to save net neutrality, the Federal Communications Commission needs political cover from advocacy groups that support reclassifying the Internet as a traditional

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Students to Analyze Yale’s Impact on New Haven (Yale Daily News) Nicole Ng reports on the launch of the Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network’s Rethinking Communities initiative at Yale University. Students will examine how Yale influences local economic development in New Haven and be able to

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Independent Conservatives Growing (The Kudlow Report) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Dorian Warren says the GOP must consider independents’ views during the primary process. Otherwise, Tea Party primary challenges against moderate incumbents will result in general election candidates whom independents will never support. Change in the Air (Harper’s

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Seven Nobel Laureates Endorse Higher U.S. Minimum Wage (Bloomberg) Lorraine Woellert reports that the laureates are part of a group of 75 economists pushing for a minimum wage of $10.10 an hour by 2016, and for indexing the minimum wage to inflation. Roosevelt Institute Chief Economist Joseph

Despite significant existing accommodations for religious organizations, the current challenges to the contraceptive mandate could severely limit access to reproductive care. On New Year’s Eve Justice Sotomayor temporarily blocked enforcement of the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) contraceptive mandate on a Colorado-based religious organization – Little Sisters for the Poor and Aged – paving the way

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. No, We Don’t Spend $1 Trillion on Welfare Each Year (WaPo) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal counters this common conservative talking point, along with the claim that welfare spending doesn’t reduce poverty. Mike takes care to define which programs are really “welfare,” and it turns out

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. The War on Poverty Turns 50: Three Lessons for Liberals Today (TNR) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal looks at new research from the Russell Sage Foundation on the successes of the War on Poverty, and considers how those accomplishments should guide liberals as poverty takes center

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. This is the Biggest Challenge Janet Yellen Will Face as Fed Chair (WaPo) Neil Irwin considers an op-ed by Larry Summers, which argues that without fiscal policy changes from Congress, the Fed’s policies have side effects that encourage bubbles. Yellen’s dilemma is whether those bubbles are worse

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Economists Agree: Raising the Minimum Wage Reduces Poverty (WaPo) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal looks at a new paper from economist Arin Dube, which finds that regardless of other effects, a higher minimum wage would pull people out of poverty. That, Mike argues, should be enough reason

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. The 25 Best Progressive Victories of 2013 (HuffPo) Peter Dreier highlights real accomplishments from the progressive movement last year, ranging from momentum on the minimum wage to continued pressures on Wall Street. He plugs the Roosevelt Institute for its involvement in the fight to reduce student

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. 2013 Was a Bad Year for Wall St. Lobbyists (TNR) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal argues that financial reform had a surprisingly good 2013. The combination of engaged activists and intellectuals and supportive legislators and regulators led to several stronger-than-expected regulations. Roosevelt Take: One example of

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. 2013 Was the Year the Grand Bargain Died. Good Riddance. (TNR) Mark Schmitt argues that striking a budget deal has received so much emphasis because it allows politicians to appear to be outside the usual partisan fights. But that’s really just magical thinking, and Congress still

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Bill Helps Solve Michigan’s Brain Drain (Lansing State Journal) Sonja Karnovsky and Adam Watkins, co-Presidents of the University of Michigan chapter of the Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network, argue that a bill that would create a tax credit to reduce student loan costs for graduates who stay

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Is the Safety Net Just Masking Tape? (NYT) Thomas Edsall uses Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal’s blog post on “pity-charity liberal capitalism” to discuss the loss of economic liberalism in policy. They agree that without structural economic reform, the safety net is merely holding things together, not progressing the

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. The quest for high-speed fiber: a conversation with Susan Crawford (The Verge) Russell Brandom and Roosevelt Institute Fellow Susan Crawford discuss how America can improve its high-speed Internet access. Susan says she’s given up on the federal government and is focusing on lobbying mayors as the best

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Why Democrats’ Doomed Family Leave Bill Matters (MSNBC) Irin Carmon argues that even though there’s almost no chance of Congress passing it, the Family and Medical Insurance Leave Act ensures that issues of caregiving and economic justice are in the news. It also creates an opportunity to

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. A Tea Party For Liberals (Majority Report) Sam Seder and Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal discuss what has prevented the rise of a liberal equivalent of the Tea Party. Liberal groups would need a lot more funding before they could break the historic partnerships with moderates that

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Invisible Child (NYT) Andrea Elliot reports in great depth on the life of a homeless girl in Fort Greene, Brooklyn. By placing this story in context with Mayor Bloomberg’s housing and homelessness policies, she makes the effects of bad policy on human lives crystal clear. Study:

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. An Agenda to Save the Euro (Project Syndicate) Roosevelt Institute Chief Economist Joseph Stiglitz lays out a plan to reform the political structure of the eurozone. Eliminating austerity policies, among other changes, could save the Euro and the European project of unity. Life in a Mobile Nation

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. “Tragedy as a generation” for U.S. Youth (Marketplace) David Brancaccio speaks to Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Jeff Madrick about the problems young people are facing in today’s economy. He says that without professional lobbyists, other groups’ needs are being heard over young people’s. CFPB To Supervise

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Will Low-Wage Jobs be the Norm? (Melissa Harris Perry) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Dorian Warren discusses low-wage work following Black Friday protests at Walmart and other retailers. As low-wage work grows, he says American social mobility has fallen to its lowest point in decades. The Spyware That Enables

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Walmart Workers Plan Protest on Black Friday (NOW with Alex Wagner) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Dorian Warren discusses how Walmart protests fit into the larger labor movement. Walmart workers have been holding strikes for a year, and they need public support year round to achieve policy change,

Members of the Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network in North Carolina refuse to be discouraged by the state’s bad news, and propose policy changes that would make a difference for their state. North Carolina has been in the news quite a lot recently, and for almost uniformly bad reasons. North Carolinians have watched as their

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. The Trouble with Pay It Forward, Pay It Back (The GC Advocate) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal argues against the pay it forward model of higher education funding that Oregon will soon attempt. He would greatly prefer using government to drive down the cost of tuition

Solutions to climate change begin at the community level, and tomorrow’s leaders must be involved in the planning process today. Over the past several months, climate change has finally inched toward the spotlight. President Obama issued a Climate Action Plan in June, and a few months later he directed the EPA to enforce carbon emission

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Wal-Mart Labor Group Promises 1,500 Black Friday Protests Next Week (Salon) Josh Eidelson speaks to Roosevelt Institute Fellow Dorian Warren about upcoming protests at Wal-Mart. Dorian compares Wal-Mart to General Motors in the 1940s, as a company that works against the economy’s best interest today, but could

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Witnesses to Hunger (and Poverty) on the Hill (The Nation) Greg Kaufmann reports on an unusual group of lobbyists on Capitol Hill: five “Witnesses to Hunger” who currently receive food stamps, who advocated for maintaining SNAP funding. Their goal was to give a face to social

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Wal-Mart Faces Warehouse Horror Allegations and Federal Labor Board Complaint (Salon) Josh Eidelson reports on Wal-Mart’s no-good, very bad day in labor news. Between allegations of worker safety concerns in California and a National Labor Relations Board complaint about strike retaliation, Wal-Mart started the week with a

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Here’s What’s Wrong With Rand Paul’s ‘Audit the Fed’ Bill (WaPo) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal argues that the Federal Reserve Transparency Act may sound like a nice idea, but it’s really just those opposed to the Fed creating another chance to question it. Reforming the Fed

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Jersey City: Cheaper, Yes, But Also a Real Sense of Community (The Atlantic Cities) Roosevelt Institute | Pipeline Fellow Nona Willis Aronowitz continues her two week series on cities where Millennials can afford to succeed. She emphasizes that Jersey City, NJ isn’t just a suburb anymore, with

The Real Movers and Shakers

Instead of electoral politics, we should be paying more attention to the community-based movement building happening around the country. There are actions, policies, battles … and then there are movements. Over the past few weeks I’ve grown increasingly concerned that episodic protests, press releases, and elections receive the lion’s share of our concern, while strategic

Millennials are more interested in learning about how the Affordable Care Act works and obtaining health insurance than hyper-partisan rhetoric. In addition to serving as Senior Fellow for Health Care for the Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network, I am the Executive Director for my campus’ Roosevelt chapter. A few weeks ago at our general body

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Hillary’s Nightmare? A Democratic Party That Realizes Its Soul Lies With Elizabeth Warren (TNR) Noam Scheiber explains why Senator Warren is at the heart of the debate about the Democrats’ identity. The argument between populists and Wall Street allies could be the central question in the Democratic

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. The Best City for the Next Generation of Artists Just Might Be Jackson (Atlantic Cities) Roosevelt Institute | Pipeline Fellow Nona Willis Aronowitz continues her series on cities where Millennials can succeed. She reports on the art scene in Jackson, MI, where young creatives are taking advantage

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. San Antonio’s Simple Appeal to Millennials: Diversity, Decent Jobs, and Cheap Living (Atlantic Cities) Roosevelt Institute | Pipeline Fellow Nona Willis Aronowitz continues her series on cities “Where Millennials Can Make It Now.” San Antonio, she says, is a bit of an underdog compared to other

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Where Millennials Can Make It Now (Atlantic Cities) Roosevelt Institute | Pipeline Fellow Nona Willis Aronowitz introduces her two-week series on cities where Millennials afford the costs of achieving their goals. The first piece, on Omaha, points out the higher levels of risk Millennials can take

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Aides Debated Obama Health-Care Coverage Promise (WSJ) Colleen McCain Nelson, Peter Nicholas, and Carol E. Lee speak to Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Richard Kirsch about the President’s assurance that people who liked their insurance would get to keep it. He says adding an asterisk for good

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Four Intriguing Ideas for How to Fix the Banks (Bloomberg Businessweek) Peter Coy speaks to Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal about the upcoming report from the Roosevelt Institute and Americans for Financial Reform, “An Unfinished Mission: Making Wall Street Work for Us.” He previews four of

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. The Great American Ripoff: The High Cost of Low Taxes (Bill Moyers) Joshua Holland argues that low taxes in the United States translate to hugely disproportionate out-of-pocket costs for things that would be covered by the social safety net in other countries. That also means there’s

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. One Federal Website That Works (Bloomberg View) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Susan Crawford looks at a new site by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, which makes regulations transparent and accessible. The CFPB also followed development practices that other agencies should copy, like open source software. Alone in

The public-private partnerships of the solution economy could allow conservatives and liberals to agree on solutions to social problems, for once. There is a quiet transformation of our society going on that is redefining how we solve our most entrenched problems. A recently published book, The Solution Revolution by William Eggers and Paul Macmillan, tracks

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Richard Nixon Knew Family Planning Saves Taxpayer Dollars, But Today’s GOP Doesn’t Care (Next New Deal) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Andrea Flynn argues that Title X funding needs to be increased, because demand for family planning services will go up as more people get health insurance. Unfortunately,

As the Affordable Care Act helps more Americans get health insurance, it’s time to increase funding for Title X, because the need for family planning services is only going up. For more than 40 years, Title X has provided family planning and reproductive health services to millions of American women. More recently, conservative lawmakers have

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Data Shows Democrats Fully Embraced by Surveillance Industry (The Real News Network) Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Tom Ferguson speaks to Jaisal Noor about his new working paper, which drew a connection between the surveillance state and campaign donations. When PRISM became public, it was hard to

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. The U.S. Needs a Tech-Smart Government (Bloomberg View) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Susan Crawford argues that the embarrassing rollout of HealthCare.gov is proof that it’s time for government to take a new approach to technology. The trouble is that tech innovation and government function in such disparate

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Who Buys the Spies? The Hidden Corporate Cash Behind America’s Out-of-Control National Surveillance State (Next New Deal) Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Tom Ferguson, Paul Jorgensen, and Jie Chen write about the connection between the surveillance state and campaign finance that they found in their recent study

This piece was cross-posted from AlterNet. This is the first in a new series from AlterNet’s New Economic Dialogue Project, edited by Lynn Parramore.  Long before President Obama kicked off his 2008 campaign, many Americans took it for granted that George W. Bush’s vast, sprawling national security apparatus needed to be reined in. For Democrats, many independents,

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. The New Populists (In These Times) Sarah Jaffe considers the work that Senators Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) and Sherrod Brown (D-OH) have been doing to bring back banking reform. This populist push isn’t necessarily making changes today, but it’s bringing the issues into the news. The $13

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Interview: Gary Gensler Explains How Financial Reform is Going (WaPo) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal speaks to Commodity Futures Trading Commission chairman Gary Gensler about the launch of “swap execution facility” platforms, which bring transparency and regulation to previously unregulated derivative swaps. This Week in Poverty:

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Wendell Berry (The Brian Lehrer Show) Wendell Berry, who was awarded the Freedom Medal at the Roosevelt Institute’s Four Freedoms Awards this week, appears on WNYC to discuss his work. His conversation with Brian Lehrer covers the farm bill, CSAs, and more. Roosevelt Take: Watch the video of the Four

California is placing a new emphasis on local community needs and closing the poverty achievement gap in education, and the rest of the country would do well to follow. As our country’s economy has limped along from one crisis to another over the past several years, the impact of state and federal austerity measures on

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Debt Ceiling Crisis Averted, House Tea Partiers Express No Regrets (MoJo) Tim Murphy reports on Tea Party reactions to the deal that reopened the government. They don’t care that they gained nothing and damaged the economy, because apparently it was more important to continue their crusade against

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. House GOPers Pushing for Anti-Birth-Control Measure in Debt Ceiling Deal (MoJo) Tim Murphy reports that while the House proposal to end the shutdown and raise the debt ceiling already contains provisions that would never pass the Senate, that isn’t enough for some Republicans. They want to

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Inequality Is a Choice (NYT) Roosevelt Institute Chief Economist Joseph Stiglitz discusses a new divide between countries who attempt to do something about income inequality and countries that don’t. If the U.S. and its peers aren’t trying to make change, why should anyone else? Living on

The “non-essential” programs that are currently unfunded due to the shutdown are in fact essential for many women and children. The GOP likes to say the war on women is a myth. But the government shutdown, now in its eleventh day, is just the latest evidence that it is indeed alive and well. It should

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Why “The Sky Hasn’t Fallen Yet” is a Bad Standard for Judging Policy Choices (The Fine Print) Nick Schwellenbach uses Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal’s piece on right-wing think tanks and the debt ceiling to explain why even if a default wasn’t catastrophic, it would still be a terrible

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Yellen, if Confirmed, Faces Daunting Task (AJAM) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal considers the challenges facing Janet Yellen. We’ll know that she’s a success if she can balance the duel mandate of employment and inflation and work towards a better economy for Americans who haven’t seen

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Five Years in Limbo (Project Syndicate) Roosevelt Institute Chief Economist Joseph Stiglitz writes that five years after the financial crises that set off the recession, the economy is still in limbo. It’s true that some problems have been addressed, but no one can call our current

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. The ‘Non-Essential’ Parts of Government That Shut Down Are Actually Quite Essential (WaPo) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konzcal breaks down some of the services government usually provides, the absences of which can cause the country real harm. It’s not all museums and panda cams: it’s trade,

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. The Values Divide (Other Words) Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Richard Kirsch argues that today’s partisan divide is based on differing concepts of responsibility and freedom. The right wants freedom from paying for anything that helps another person, while progressive responsibility is to others. Boehner Tells Republicans

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Republicans Split On Whether To Give Back Pay To Workers Furloughed In Government Shutdown (HuffPo) Sabrina Siddiqui and Dave Jamieson report that while furloughed workers have always received backpay in the past, some Republicans say we might not be able to afford it. That the furloughed employees

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Shutdown: The Last-Minute Tactics That Failed (MSNBC) Suzy Khimm and Benjy Sarlin discuss how Congress failed to move their negotiations forward last night. Boehner has finally proposed a conference, something that Senate Democrats have called for almost as often as the House votes to repeal Obamacare. The

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. The House’s Food Stamps Cuts Aren’t Just Cruel. They’re Dumb. (WaPo) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal explains why the GOP’s plan to require states to follow a $2,000 assets test for SNAP eligibility is bad policy. Assets tests create poverty traps, forcing families to avoid saving

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Default Notes (NYT) Paul Krugman is concerned by the seeming non-response from markets to the possibility of a government default in mid-October. Shouldn’t big business be worrying about the possibility of another recession, cuts to Federal spending, and a plunging dollar? You Really Ought to Be More

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Can Say-on-Pay Curb Executive Compensation? (Roosevelt Institute) In her new policy note, Roosevelt Institute Director of Research Susan Holmberg argues that Say-on-Pay, which allows shareholders to vote on executive pay packages, is working, because even when shareholders approve CEO pay, boards are paying attention to the

After growing up with protracted conflicts in the Middle East, Millennials are glad to see the U.S .consider a diplomatic response to Syria, but know it might not end there. The past few weeks have seen a heated debate in the news and through the halls of Congress on whether or not the United States

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. How Washington Caved to Wall Street (TIME) Roosevelt Institute Chief Economist Joseph Stiglitz argues that Wall Street lobbyists have managed to essentially halt financial reform in the U.S. Banks and the administration are working side-by-side to convince Americans that the financial sector is working safely, but

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Is Richmond’s Mortgage Seizure Scheme Even Legal? (WaPo) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal looks at the questions raised by Richmond, CA’s proposal to use eminent domain to reduce underwater mortgage debt. He argues that the plan has plenty of legal precedent, and clear benefits for the

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. What We Get Wrong When We Talk About ‘The Financial Crisis’ (Majority Report) Sam Seder speaks with Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal about his most recent piece at the Washington Post‘s Wonkblog, where he argued that Lehman shouldn’t be the center of the financial crisis narrative.

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Industry Groups Vow to Expose Union-Backed Worker Centers (The Hill) Kevin Bogardus spoke to Roosevelt Institute Fellow Dorian Warren, who says that newly tightened partnerships between unions and worker centers will result in heightened scrutiny. As nonprofits instead of unions, worker centers fall under different laws, and

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. There is Still Much to Learn From Lehman (FT) Roosevelt Institute Chief Economist Joseph Stiglitz argues that the response to the financial crisis didn’t do enough to change the system. The financial sector successfully fought off reforms, and the same ideologies that led to the crisis

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. New York’s Campaign-Finance Law Worked, but New Yorkers Still Won’t Celebrate It (TNR) Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Mark Schmitt applauds the success of New York City’s small donor campaign finance law. Outside spending was incredibly low in last week’s election, especially when compared to 2012 Senate

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. SNAP Proposal Would Deny Benefits to Millions (Melissa Harris-Perry) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Dorian Warren pointed out the disappointing side of American exceptionalism: the most children in poverty of any wealthy democracy. Cutting SNAP benefits means more of those children go hungry. What We Get Wrong When

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Joe Stiglitz: The People Who Break the Rules Have Raked in Huge Profits and Wealth and It’s Sickening Our Politics (Alternet) Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow and Chief Economist Joseph Stiglitz addressed the AFL-CIO convention in Los Angeles earlier this week. Alternet has the transcript, and the

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Union Chief Calls for a ‘Reawakening’ (The Hill) Kevin Bogardus looks at the AFL-CIO’s plan to reinvigorate the labor movement. He speaks to Roosevelt Institute Fellow Dorian Warren, who says that giving more organizations membership in the federation is meant to signal a desire to make the

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email Why Janet Yellen, Not Larry Summers, Should Lead the Fed (NYT) Roosevelt Institute Chief Economist Joseph Stiglitz argues that Summers’s role in deregulation in the 1990s led to today’s economic issues. He’d much prefer a Fed chair with proven judgement and expertise who didn’t help to

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. America’s Jobless Generation (NYRB) Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow and Director of the Bernard L. Schwartz Rediscovering Government Initiative Jeff Madrick argues that policy, not technology, is keeping unemployment high. He’s particularly concerned about the effect of these policies on young people. Why This Particular Recovery Is

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. A Dramatic Display of Labor’s Power (Melissa Harris-Perry) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Dorian Warren points out the differences in how stakeholders discuss the fast food strikes. The restaurant industry talks about digging into the pockets of small business owners; the workers want a fair share of massive

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. A New Dawn for Labor Day (BeyondChron) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Annette Bernhardt considers the importance and significance of the August 29 fast food strikes. The growth of these strikes and other labor organizing shows a new hunger for worker representation on the job. Economic Justice to

The Greater Boston network of Roosevelt Institute | Pipeline hosted a discussion on the State of the New Deal, and what needs to change for Millennials to support similar programs today. On Tuesday night, the Greater Boston network of Roosevelt Institute | Pipeline gathered for a panel discussion on “The State of the New Deal,”

A focus on student loan rates isn’t enough to help low-income students. The government needs to improve how it helps these students get enrolled in the first place. President Obama recently signed a bipartisan bill that ties student loan interest rates to the financial markets, which allows this year’s undergraduates to borrow at 3.9 percent

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Latest Pew Study Shows 70 Percent of U.S. Has Broadband. But Access Is Still Unequal (Wired) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Susan Crawford thinks that the Pew study has too broad a definition of “high-speed,” and demonstrates the persistence of the digital divide. It shouldn’t be acceptable that

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Helping the Unemployed Move Might Not Help Them Find a Job (WaPo) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal thinks that relocating the long-term unemployed to areas with lower unemployment will result in their being unemployed in a new place. It would be better to concentrate on improving the

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. The Changing of the Monetary Guard (Project Syndicate) Roosevelt Institute Chief Economist Joseph Stiglitz lists a number of qualities that he thinks are important for the next Federal Reserve Chair. His pick is Janet Yellen, for her ability to form consensus and her strong attention on labor

The Bernard L. Schwartz Rediscovering Government Initiative’s conference, “A Bold Approach to the Jobs Emergency,” which now has transcripts and video online, was just the first step. When the Roosevelt Institute’s Bernard L. Schwartz Rediscovering Government Initiative, led by Senior Fellow Jeff Madrick, started planning a conference on the jobs emergency, we knew a problem

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Four Ideas For How Obama Could Really Transform The Cost Of College (ThinkProgress) Bryce Covert presents four truly transformative ideas, which would have far more effect than keeping student loan interest rates low. She pulls from Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konzcal for her fourth suggestion: make public

The DoL and SEC should implement their proposed changes to the ethical standards of the financial services industry that would ensure consumers get the best possible financial advice. A long-discussed but never implemented policy change surrounding ethical standards for the financial services industry is hitting the news again. Both the Department of Labor and the

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Breaking Out of a Cramped Economic Policy Debate (NYT) Jared Bernstein questions the continued false choices presented by our partisan policy debates. These arguments can’t be about who wins, because then our policy is focused on winners and losers instead of fairness, opportunity, and growth. Stop Worrying

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Conservatives Don’t Get That Some Problems are Public, and It’s Hurting Them (WaPo) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal sees a cognitive dissonance when conservatives try to argue that economic issues are all private problems to be fixed on the individual level. Inequality is a public problem, and

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. The Future Of Television (Diane Rehm Show) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Susan Crawford discusses the limits of how web-based models like Netfix can disrupt traditional cable television. Without high-speed internet access, none of these models work, and the cable companies control most broadband. Bash Brothers: How Globalization

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. The Offline Wage Wars of Silicon Valley (Next City) Roosevelt Institute | Pipeline Fellow Nona Willis Aronowitz writes on the fight to increase the minimum wage in San Jose, where poverty exists in sharp contrast to Silicon Valley successes. This piece was published on a pay-to-read

New models for mortgage standards out of Dodd-Frank have banks insisting that they cannot do without federal support, just as we begin to look to the end of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. As the first decade of the 2000s ushered in industry-wide privatization of the housing market, banks began to transition from more reliable

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Veto Decision Looms for DC Retail Living Wage Bill (The Nation) Josh Eidelson speaks to Roosevelt Institute Fellow Dorian Warren, who thinks that it’s fine if DC’s living wage bill targets Wal-Mart, because it sets standards for its industry. He suggests that initiatives like this one are

Download the policy note (PDF) by Georgia Levenson Keohane

In a new policy note, Roosevelt Institute Fellow Georgia Levenson Keohane analyzes a new model of social entrepreneurship, which utilizes private funds to solve social problems. Social impact bonds finance preventative programs that the government does not have the budget to fund, but raise questions about whether a return-on-investment model is really the best way to approach social needs and if the funding sources affect the work being done.

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Can Social Impact Bonds Unlock Private Money for Public Goods? Innovation in Pay-for-Success and Social Finance (Roosevelt Institute) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Georgia Levenson Keohane analyzes a new model for solving social ills. Social impact bonds finance preventative programs with private funds, but raise questions about whether a

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Young Detroiters Double Down (TAP) Roosevelt Institute | Pipeline Fellow Nona Willis Aronowitz visits Detroit, where she finds that Millennial natives are taking the lead in revitalizing the city. Many programs focus on bringing in outsiders for short terms of service, but these Detroiters are here

The more the telecommunications industry tries to discredit Roosevelt Institute Fellow Susan Crawford, the stronger her work looks. It’s always entertaining to watch when the opposition is clearly worried about something you’re working on, but it’s less fun when they try to smear you and misrepresent your work. When you can prove that’s what they’re

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Bernanke Did Well, but the Fed Must do Better (FT) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal looks at the Goldilocks question facing the next Fed Chair: is current policy in response to the Great Recession too hot, too cold, or just right? He says that the Fed

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Prisons are Shrinking. That Won’t Necessarily Last. (WaPo) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal questions whether the Great Recession has had an effect on our incarceration system. It seems that the slow decline in incarceration rates started before the recession, but we could use this moment to

U.S. conservatives want Europe’s abortion restrictions, but they oppose the generous systems and legal exceptions that support women’s health. Earlier this month, Texas lawmakers witnessed and participated in passionate debates about one of the nation’s most sweeping pieces of anti-choice legislation. That legislation, known as SB1, was initially delayed by Wendy Davis’s now-famous filibuster and

By enacting legislation creating public benefit corporations in Delaware, the state has the potential to push this form of social entrepreneurship to new heights.  Social entrepreneurship made a huge step forward this month, as Delaware Governor Jack Markell signed legislation creating a new corporate form, the public benefit corporation, that enables companies to “do well

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Finally, Bank Regulators Have Had Enough (ProPublica) Jesse Eisinger looks at the new rules regulators are finally pushing through, which place more stringent capital ratio requirements on U.S. banks. He argues that this higher standard will advantage U.S. banks in the international market, because it will protect

The two years it took to confirm Richard Cordray to direct the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau were only part of an even longer fight. Following Harry Reid’s threat to eliminate the filibuster for executive appointments – the so-called “nuclear option” – the Senate finally confirmed Richard Cordray as Director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau,

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Bank vs. America (U.S. News & World Report) Pat Garofalo pulls from Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal’s work to explain why the failure of the Home Affordable Modification Program matters. Areas with more mortgage debt have higher unemployment and weaker recoveries, making mortgage modifications essential. This

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. How Intellectual Property Reinforces Inequality (NYT) Roosevelt Institute Chief Economist and Senior Fellow Joseph Stiglitz applauds the Supreme Court’s decision in the Myriad Genetics case. He says Myriad’s patent on the BCRA genes was a horrible manifestation of inequality of healthcare access and thus economic inequality.

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Wal-Mart Won’t Open 3 D.C. Stores Due to Wage Law (Bloomberg TV) Erik Schatzker speaks to Roosevelt Institute Fellow Dorian Warren on the D.C. living wage law. Dorian suggests that the mayor shouldn’t veto the bill, because Wal-Mart’s need to expand in new markets will overpower

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Whites and the Safety Net (NYT) Paul Krugman builds on Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal’s argument on libertarian populism, and further examines why that model should not appeal to working-class white voters who rely on safety net programs like unemployment and food stamps. Roosevelt Take: You

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. How to Raise a Progressive Kid in Alabama (The Nation) Roosevelt Institute | Pipeline Fellow Nona Willis Aronowtiz writes on the costs – financial and otherwise – of raising a child in a place where you are member of the political minority who wants to pass

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. The Part-Timer Problem (TAP) Harold Meyerson wonders if the employer mandate would really have helped many get health insurance in the first place, since full-time jobs have been on the decline for years. Saner, he thinks, would be to separate employment and health care entirely. Roosevelt Take:

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Happy Fourth of July! Today’s Daily Digest is an abridged holiday edition. We will return to the full-length Daily Digest tomorrow. Paid Sick Leave Laws Generate More Concern Than Pain (NYT) Robb Mandelbaum reports that it turns out paid sick leave laws aren’t such a big

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. White House Delays Key Element of Health Care Law (AP) Ricardo Alonoso-Zalvidar speaks to Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Richard Kirsch about the news that the administration is delaying implementation of the employer mandate. Kirsch is outraged about how this will affect employees who expected insurance on

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Roosevelt’s Legacy, Burning Brightly (NYT) Edward Rothstein reports on the newly renovated Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum in Hyde Park, NY. The overhaul, the first since FDR dedicated the library in 1941, has been open to the public since Sunday. Bright Kids, Small City

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Legalizing Marijuana is Hard. Regulating a Pot Industry is Even Harder. (WaPo) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal looks at the questions surrounding the new legal marijuana market in Washington state, which is regulated by the Liquor Control Board. The challenges are numerous, and the state’s priorities

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Why Marriage Equality Is Good For The Economy And The Budget (ThinkProgress) Bryce Covert brings back a 2004 CBO study of what it would mean for the federal government to recognize same-sex marriage. The study says it could reduce the incidence of same-sex couples living in poverty

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Helping the Economic Climate (U.S. News & World Report) David Brodwin disagrees with those who argue that we cannot “afford” to fight climate change. There are immense money-saving options built into climate change plans, and a broad-based carbon tax could be the best solution. Roosevelt Take:

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Highway Robbery for High-Speed Internet (TAP) Paul Waldman quotes Roosevelt Institute Fellow Susan Crawford on why telecom companies can get away with charging whatever they please. Until telecom monopolies and duopolies are more tightly regulated, broadband won’t get cheaper. One of the Worst Patents Ever Just

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Is it Time to Tweak Obamacare? Sen. Joe Donnelly Thinks So. (WaPo) Sarah Kliff speaks to the Senator, who wants to change the definition of full-time hours in the Affordable Care Act from 30 to 40. He wants to prevent part-time workers from getting their hours cut

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Why Forks in Your Office Kitchen Keep Disappearing (Marketplace) Audrey Quinn speaks to Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal about why office support positions are being cut in the recession. Mike says technology made some tasks, like booking travel, much simpler, but someone still needs to wash

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. What Congress and the Media Are Missing in the Food Stamp Debate (The Nation) Greg Kaufmann asks why we are talking about everything except the state of hunger in the U.S. when we talk about cutting SNAP benefits. There are people in this country who cannot

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. “This was really eye-opening for me”: Fed’s Raskin Shocked at Low Quality of Work at Local Job Fair (Reuters) Pedro da Costa notes that Sarah Bloom Raskin’s comments at A Bold Approach to the Jobs Emergency on June 4th were surprisingly personal. Raskin’s trip to the job

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. When Unpaid Internships are Illegal (MSNBC) On All In With Chris Hayes, Roosevelt Institute Fellow Dorian Warren discussed the normalization of unpaid internships in all sectors, even government, in response to last week’s ruling that Fox Searchlight violated labor laws by not paying interns. Faces of

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. New York Aims to Treat Underage Models as Child Performers (NYT) Eric Wilson reports that the New York State Legislature has approved a measure that changes labor laws affecting fashion. It’s possible that this could force an aesthetic change on the industry, which produces clothes for

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Fiscal Fixes for the Jobless Recovery (WSJ) Following his keynote address at A Bold Approach to the Jobs Emergency last week, Alan Blinder presents changes we could make to encourage more hiring. His solutions could appeal to Republican obstructionists: they may be government-based, but the jobs

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email George Packer’s U.S.A. (TAP) In his review of The Unwinding, Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Mark Schmitt examines how the novel can help us understand the effects of the financial crisis. Nostalgia for better economic times rules the day, and the book struggles to look forward. Is

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Take Me Out to the Ball Game — But Pay Me a Living Wage (Bill Moyers) Michael Winship writes on the side of America’s pastime that isn’t making the big bucks: concession workers. The company contracted by the San Francisco Giants pays their staff only $11,000

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email Japan Is a Model, Not a Cautionary Tale (NYT) Roosevelt Institute Chief Economist Joseph Stiglitz thinks that we should be following Shinzo Abe’s lead, because even as Japan’s working age population shrinks, their G.D.P. is still growing respectably. Student Advocates Back #DontDoubleMyRate Campaign, But Don’t Support

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Why the Right is Wrong About Jobs (Market Watch) Rex Nutting argues that the structural difficulties in hiring, like cost of labor, taxes, and (according to its detractors) Obamacare, don’t explain the lack of job growth right now. The Keynesian model seems to make more sense:

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Conference Calls For Bold Approaches To The Jobs Emergency (Campaign for America’s Future) Derek Pugh reports on the Roosevelt Institute’s jobs conference on Tuesday, which pointed at unemployment rather than deficits as the real economic crisis. Panelists offered numerous possible solutions, including New Deal-style job strategies,

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Fed’s Raskin Bemoans Quality of New Jobs (WSJ) Eric Morath and Victoria McGrane report that Federal Reserve Governor Sarah Bloom Raskin, a panelist at yesterday’s Roosevelt Institute conference, said she became concerned about the kinds of jobs being created when she attended a job fair. The

States are showing budget surpluses, but that doesn’t mean that everything has been fixed post-recession. News of surging income-tax revenues and surprise budget surpluses has brightened statehouses over the past few weeks, but it’s worth asking whether we should be thinking of these revised fiscal projections as surpluses at all. After all, current state surpluses

The Jobs Emergency

On Tuesday, June 4th, the Roosevelt Institute’s Rediscovering Government initiative will host A Bold Approach to the Jobs Emergency, a daylong conference exploring the roles of government, policy, and activism in addressing historic levels of unemployment and economic misery. A lot is said about the jobs crisis in America, but not enough. We have a

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. The tax break state (WaPo) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal breaks down how the different kinds of tax expenditures work based on income distribution, and explains how they affect current policy debates that revolve around infamous numbers like 47 percent and the 1 percent. Matriarchy, patriarchy

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Americans are not happy with their Internet service providers (Marketplace) Ben Johnson talks to Roosevelt Institute Fellow Susan Crawford about the latest American Consumer Satisfaction Index, which shows ISPs are dead last in keeping customers happy. With little to no competition, they’d rather put profits into

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Comcast and Verizon’s Phony Free-Speech Claim (Bloomberg) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Susan Crawford knows that it’s the cable and internet providers who are trying to limit speech through their control of what’s available over their wires. Business decisions aren’t free speech- especially when they limit fair competition.

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email The GOP doesn’t oppose Richard Cordray. It opposes his whole agency. (WaPo) Roosevelt Fellow Mike Konczal explains why Republican opposition to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is based on falsehoods. Unfortunately, filibusters mean that Republican temper tantrums about the power of the CFPB translate to blocking

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Globalisation isn’t just about profits. It’s about taxes too (The Guardian) Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Joseph Stiglitz argues that in today’s global economy, all countries suffer when major corporations take advantage of tax loopholes, and that reform is needed so that corporations pay a fair income

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Nobel winner: Cut student loan rates (USA Today) Roosevelt Institute Chief Economist Joseph Stiglitz says he backs Elizabeth Warren’s plan to let students borrow at the same discount rate as banks because student debt is holding back our economy, especially compared to countries that are actually

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. What’s in millennials’ wallets? Fewer credit cards (LA Times) Emily Alpert talks to Pipeline Fellow Nona Willis Aronowitz about why young households are carrying less and less credit card debt. According to Aronowitz, it’s all about fear of an uncertain future. Roosevelt Take: Aronowitz discusses why

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. The Case for Raising the Minimum Wage (U.S. News and World Report) David Cooper makes the case that raising the minimum wage is not only advisable but necessary: with full-time minimum wage workers living below the poverty line, every taxpayer is subsidizing low wage employers. Not

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail.

What’s the best way to pass a climate bill? Fix the economy first. (WaPo)

TOP