Tim Price

Tim Price is the Roosevelt Institute's Editorial Director.

An election night survey conducted by Democracy Corps on behalf of the Roosevelt Institute finds that Roosevelt’s Rewriting the Rules message—that inequality is a choice, and that we can rewrite the rules to level the playing field and grow the economy—is a winner with voters, who strongly favor a call for bold action over the messages they heard

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The emergence of the gig economy, also known as the sharing or on-demand economy, has raised a number of questions about how the rules of our economy, ranging from labor to education to the social safety net, should respond and evolve. Our Next American Economy (NAE) project, led by Roosevelt Senior Fellow Bo Cutter, has convened experts across

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A poll of 900 likely 2016 voters conducted July 13–18 by Democracy Corps found that the Roosevelt Institute’s Rewrite the Rules economic narrative outperforms a narrative focused on building on the progress that the Obama administration has achieved. In particular, it does better when pitted against a nationalist message focused on America not “winning” anymore, and

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In the latest web survey of Roosevelt’s opinion research conducted by Stan Greenberg and Democracy Corps, 2016 likely voters continue to support progressive economic narratives and policies. Specifically, a message and agenda with a strong economic argument around curbing the power and influence of corporations and the financial industry overwhelmingly wins over a nationalist economic message

The Franklin D. Roosevelt Distinguished Public Service Awards honor individuals whose careers exemplify President Roosevelt’s extraordinary dedication to public service and seek to inspire a renewed national commitment to the principals for which FDR stood. This year’s awards were held on Tuesday, June 7 in Washington, D.C. Change can take a lifetime, and these men

In “Rewriting the Tax Code for a Stronger, More Equitable Economy,” our new brief based on the work of Roosevelt Institute Chief Economist Joseph E. Stiglitz, we call for a rewrite of the tax code to encourage productive economic activity and discourage risky and shortsighted behavior, with the ultimate goal of reducing inequality while increasing growth.

The Roosevelt Institute and the Kauffman Foundation have jointly released a new e-book, The Good Economy, co-written by Roosevelt Senior Fellow Bo Cutter, Kauffman Vice President Dane Stangler, and Council on Foreign Relations Adjunct Senior Fellow Robert Litan. The book, which explores different economic futures facing the United States, offers a corrective to much of today’s

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Millennials will be an important and powerful voting bloc in 2016—they represent over a third of the workforce and 30.5 percent of eligible voters, including half of eligible Latino voters. But do we know what that means for the 2016 election—and beyond? Will young people defy expectations of low turnout? The Next Generation Blueprint for 2016,

The budget proposal put forth by House Republicans this week has been roundly criticized as yet another attempt to enact massive tax cuts that would redistribute money to the top at the expense of middle- and low-income families. Republicans contend these cuts would pay for themselves by producing rapid economic growth, which would create the

Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest. This Is the Key to Recovering Black Wealth in America (The Nation) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal and Bryce Covert note that housing segregation continues to limit Black economic mobility and contribute to a racist criminal justice system. Obama’s Tax

Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest. Why D.C. Is Up in Arms About Derivatives… Again (Marketplace) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal tells Stan Alcorn that the financial regulation repealed in the budget deal had already been scaled back to include only the riskiest types of derivatives trading.

Full implementation of the UDHR isn’t a pipe dream, but it will require us to look beyond governments and international institutions. Sixty-six years after the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, who is responsible for upholding our most basic rights as humans? And are rights truly universal, or are they relative? These questions

Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest. Pensions and Private Equity (NYT) In a letter to the editor, Roosevelt Institute Fellow Saqib Bhatti says public pension funds should use the leverage provided by their huge pools of capital to demand transparency from Wall Street firms. City Pays

Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest. What Markets Will (NYT) Many economic analysts talk about the market as a kind of divine force, writes Paul Krugman, but they’re only using it as an excuse to justify their own desire for more human sacrifice. AbbVie Board Ditches

Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest. The Blotch on Eric Holder’s Record: Wall Street Accountability (The Nation) While the departing Attorney General would prefer to focus on his civil rights legacy, George Zornick notes how little Holder’s Justice Department has done to punish the architects of the

Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest. America’s Dark Economic Secret: How a Giant Gimmick Has Wages and Jobs Hanging by a Thread (Salon) Tax-dodging techniques like inversions have turned all corporations into financial firms focused on moving their money around so that the government can’t get to

The success of The Roosevelts: An Intimate History highlights the people behind the policies that reshaped America. As the CEO of the Roosevelt Institute, I am reminded almost daily about the very personal connection people feel to Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt. The extraordinary critical acclaim for the new Ken Burns documentary The Roosevelts: An Intimate

Predatory lenders drove municipal governments and taxpayers into debt with risky interest rate swap deals that may have violated federal regulations. The story of how Wall Street banks steered unsuspecting homebuyers towards complex mortgages with hidden risks and hidden costs has been well-documented. In fact, the typical sales pitch for adjustable-rate mortgages was premised on

The Next American Economy project brought together 30 experts from various disciplines to envision tomorrow’s economic and political challenges and develop today’s solutions. Their assignment: be bold, and leave the conventional wisdom — and their own opinions — behind. In today’s video, Lenny Mendonca of McKinsey & Company discusses the groundwork that’s been laid for a serious

The Next American Economy project brought together 30 experts from various disciplines to envision tomorrow’s economic and political challenges and develop today’s solutions. Their assignment: be bold, and leave the conventional wisdom — and their own opinions — behind. In today’s video, Measure of America’s Sarah Burd-Sharps looks at the sweeping consequences of the government’s failure to

The Next American Economy project brought together 30 experts from various disciplines to envision tomorrow’s economic and political challenges and develop today’s solutions. Their assignment: be bold, and leave the conventional wisdom — and their own opinions — behind. In today’s video, Brookings’ Robert Litan presents the evidence that incumbent firms will consume an increasingly large piece

The Next American Economy project brought together 30 experts from various disciplines to envision tomorrow’s economic and political challenges and develop today’s solutions. Their assignment: be bold, and leave the conventional wisdom — and their own opinions — behind. In today’s video, Dane Stangler of the Kauffman Foundation predicts that the entrepreneur class will become more diverse

The Next American Economy project brought together 30 experts from various disciplines to envision tomorrow’s economic and political challenges and develop today’s solutions. Their assignment: be bold, and leave the conventional wisdom — and their own opinions — behind. In today’s video, political economist Gar Alperovitz speculates on what could happen if workers claim power over small

The Next American Economy project brought together 30 experts from various disciplines to envision tomorrow’s economic and political challenges and develop today’s solutions. Their assignment: be bold, and leave the conventional wisdom — and their own opinions — behind. In today’s video, Lawrence Katz imagines a future “artisanal economy” in which crafty workers carve out their own

The Next American Economy project brought together 30 experts from various disciplines to envision tomorrow’s economic and political challenges and develop today’s solutions. Their assignment: be bold, and leave the conventional wisdom — and their own opinions — behind. In today’s video, economist Frank Levy foretells tech and health care trends resulting in longer lifespans

The Next American Economy project brought together 30 experts from various disciplines to envision tomorrow’s economic and political challenges and develop today’s solutions. Their assignment: be bold, and leave the conventional wisdom — and their own opinions — behind. In today’s video, Rob Atkinson speculates that concerns about technological unemployment are misplaced, and that the real challenge

The Next American Economy project brought together 30 experts from various disciplines to envision tomorrow’s economic and political challenges and develop today’s solutions. Their assignment: be bold, and leave the conventional wisdom — and their own opinions — behind. In today’s video, Roosevelt Institute Fellow Dorian Warren speculates on the political fallout of growing inequality

The Next American Economy project brought together 30 experts from various disciplines to envision tomorrow’s economic and political challenges and develop today’s solutions. Their assignment: be bold, and leave the conventional wisdom — and their own opinions — behind. In today’s video, tech entrepreneur Mike Mathieu imagines what happens when data-mining is done directly to the human brain. Mike

The Next American Economy project brought together 30 experts from various disciplines to envision tomorrow’s economic and political challenges and develop today’s solutions. Their assignment: be bold, and leave the conventional wisdom — and their own opinions — behind. In today’s video, SEIU’s Andy Stern offers a darker take on a future in which continued technological innovation has had

The Next American Economy project brought together 30 experts from various disciplines to envision tomorrow’s economic and political challenges and develop today’s solutions. Their assignment: be bold, and leave the conventional wisdom — and their own opinions — behind. In today’s video, Kelly Services CEO Carl Camden speculates about a future workforce dominated by temporary employees. The CEO

The Next American Economy project brought together 30 experts from various disciplines to envision tomorrow’s economic and political challenges and develop today’s solutions. Their assignment: be bold, and leave the conventional wisdom — and their own opinions — behind. Their goal: not to provide a researched analysis, but to stimulate debate on critical questions. In today’s video, Etsy Public Policy

The Next American Economy project brought together 30 experts from various disciplines to envision tomorrow’s economic and political challenges and develop today’s solutions. Their assignment: be bold, and leave the conventional wisdom — and their own opinions — behind. Their goal: not to provide a researched analysis, but to stimulate debate on critical questions.In the debut entry

Honorees at the 2014 FDR Distinguished Public Service Awards felt vindicated — but why does public service need vindicating? Outside of election night victory speeches, it’s rare to see America’s elected officials express much happiness in public. In a political culture dominated by partisan rancor, personal attacks, and donor-friendly positioning, governing seems a joyless affair.

Research shows that government subsidies for the 1 percent are creating greater inequality. A new white paper by Roosevelt Institute Chief Economist Joseph Stiglitz offers solutions. “What’s the effective rate I’ve been paying? It’s probably closer to the 15 percent rate than anything.” Mitt Romney made national news with that statement during the 2012 presidential

Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest. On the Civil Rights Act’s 50th, Workplaces Remain Segregated (Colorlines) Though the Civil Rights Act brought legal segregation to an end decades ago, people of color are still being pushed into lower-paying occupations, writes Rinku Sen. Roosevelt Take: A new infographic

Millennials who are being forced to move back home may have their economic futures determined by the affluence of their birthplace rather than their own ability. If you could live in Westchester County, NY or Logan County, OH, which would you choose? What if you were young, college-educated, and just entering the workforce? Recent articles about

Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest. The Wage War for Public Workers’ Unions (MSNBC) Harris v. Quinn shows Supreme Court conservatives want to “weaponize the First Amendment” against public unions, says Roosevelt Institute Fellow Dorian Warren. The Supreme Court Doesn’t Care for Caregiving Workers (HuffPost) Roosevelt Institute

Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest. Supreme Court Delivers a Win for Hobby Lobby and a Loss for US Women (The Hill) The majority ruled that the contraceptive mandate was a burden on religious employers, but ignored the burden of women’s health costs, writes Roosevelt Institute

Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest. Inequality Is Not Inevitable (NYT) Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow and Chief Economist Joseph Stiglitz argues that policies and politics have created America’s economic divide, and only engaged citizens can fix it. Roosevelt Take: For more on Stiglitz’s plan to address inequality,

Municipal fiber networks are spreading from coast to coast, but not all community fiber is equal, and some cities have taken very different approaches. What are they getting right, and where is there room for improvement to ensure universal high-speed Internet access? Roosevelt Institute Fellow Susan Crawford, joined by Harvard Law School students John Connolly

Nobel-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz argues that tax reform is the key to addressing inequality in a new Roosevelt Institute paper released today. Click here to listen to Stiglitz describe the key arguments of the paper. Click here to read his recent congressional testimony on why inequality matters and what can be done about it. The

When Franklin D. Roosevelt put his team together to craft the New Deal, he sought out thinkers and doers who could rise to the challenges of their time. As the Roosevelt Institute works to carry on that legacy and build a New Deal for the 21st century, the nation’s challenges remain daunting: a growing concentration

This post is the first in the Roosevelt Institute’s National Women’s Health Week series, which will address pressing issues affecting the health and economic security of women and families in the United States. Today, a look at why conservative policies at the state level are leading to increased maternal mortality rates. For much of the

Students across the country are asking how their colleges and universities shape the communities around them. The Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network’s Rethinking Communities initiative is entering a new phase. In January, students began their research, asking difficult questions that drew on the work of the Democracy Collaborative and others. Their purpose: to examine whether

Thomas Piketty’s success is no fluke; he and other progressive thinkers have redefined the public debate around inequality. Inequality suddenly is the topic of the moment. Last weekend the French economist Thomas Piketty – whose recently published Capital in the 21st Century is now #1 on the Amazon best seller list, shocking for a 690-page macroeconomic tome – was

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. That ’70s Show, Starring Ted Cruz (New Republic) Despite conservatives’ tendency to compare Barack Obama to Jimmy Carter, today’s economic challenges are the opposite of those the U.S. faced in the 1970s, writes Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal. When Tax Refunds Aren’t Just a Bonus, But a

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. Read My Lips: More New Taxes! (New Republic) Tax Day would be a time for celebration if there were a clearer connection between paying taxes and receiving the many valuable public services and benefits they fund, writes Jonathan Cohn. TurboTax Maker Linked to ‘Grassroots’ Campaign Against

Unemployment is still a major problem in the U.S., and the best solutions involve a more aggressive government response. The Congressional Progressive Caucus budget, released last Wednesday, is forecast to create more than 8 million jobs by 2017 – a claim that is bound to stir up an argument about the government’s role in job

The “Better Off Budget” is the only budget proposal in Congress that really places people’s needs ahead of political compromise. The Congressional Progressive Caucus has issued its annual budget and it is in different ways the antithesis of what both the Republicans and Democrats are offering. The Caucus calls it the “Better Off Budget,” and

The CBO’s projections often miss the mark, but its mandate is to produce a politically useful number. The admirable Jared Bernstein entirely misses the point in his post about recent critiques of the Congressional Budget Office. Floyd Norris, Zachary Karabell, and Dean Baker have noted how often the CBO gets it wrong, and how it

Never mind the conservative fear-mongering. The Affordable Care Act’s subsidies will boost the economy and free workers who were locked into their jobs. The attack on the Affordable Care Act by conservative Republicans after the release of the Congressional Budget Office’s new report was desperate. Bravo to much of the media for setting the story

Decades after FDR called for a national minimum wage, the debate continues — and his arguments for it still ring true. We have not only seen minimum wage and maximum hour provisions prove their worth economically and socially under government auspices in 1933, 1934 and 1935, but the people of this country, by an overwhelming

The president promised to do what he can without Congress, even if it isn’t much. From a political point of view, President Obama gave one of the best speeches of his presidency last night. In this, his fifth State of the Union Address, he avoided all apologies. No word about the slow progress on cutting

A perspective on the Christie administration’s behavior from someone who’s seen firsthand how government operates. For those who are not familiar with the story — perhaps that same set of people who in questionnaires do not know where the Mississippi River or the Pacific Ocean is — Governor Chris Christie’s staff created a several-day monstrous

Even liberal mainstream economists often overlook the role of coercion in setting wages. It was a great pleasure to read one of Paul Krugman’s columns over the holidays, entitled “The Fear Economy.” I’d say it’s my favorite of 2013 because he took a decided step away from standard orthodox theory. Even Krugman rarely does that.

Extremists who think government support for the unemployed is holding the economy back don’t have the facts on their side. It’s a rare day indeed when Next New Deal bloggers support economic arguments with links to the Weekly Standard, the American Enterprise Institute, and Goldman Sachs. But at this moment, in this economy, we are all

As Americans reject the extreme right wing at the polls, FDR’s vision of self-government may be on the rise again. Note: On Nov. 8-9, David Woolner and other leading thinkers will explore the past, present, and future of progressivism at a conference hosted by the Roosevelt Institute and the Clinton Institute for American Studies at

Corporations are increasingly active in U.S. politics, and their investors deserve to know where the money is going. Click here to read Susan Holmberg’s new paper, “A Cost-Benefit Analysis of Corporate Political Spending Disclosure.” A core assumption of the Supreme Court’s opinion in 2010’s troubling Citizens United case, which broadened corporations’ abilities to use their

Republicans have thoroughly discredited themselves and cleared the way for President Obama to put forward a new agenda. Well, that was fun. We just escaped another Perils of Pauline moment by deciding not to test the proposition that default doesn’t matter, and the Republican Party’s (apparently diminishing) instincts for self-preservation finally overcame its fear of

Download the paper (PDF) by Thomas Ferguson, Paul Jorgensen, and Jie Chen

This working paper by Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Thomas Ferguson, Paul Jorgensen, and Jie Chen analyzes patterns of industrial structure and party competition in the 2012 presidential election. The analysis rests on a new and more comprehensive campaign finance database that catches far more of the myriad ways businesses and major investors make political contributions than previous studies. By drawing on this unified database, the paper is able to show that both major parties depend on very large donors to a greater extent than past studies have estimated.

Tonight, the Roosevelt Institute will honor five incredible laureates whose work has carried on the legacy of Franklin D. Roosevelt. Click here to watch the livestream beginning at 6 p.m.

By choosing not to position himself as a defender of government, President Obama may have made his opposition stronger. The recent news that there has been a shift in tone in the debate between congressional Republicans and the White House over the government shutdown has been greeted as a welcome development in much of the

On Wednesday, October 16, the Roosevelt Institute will present the 2013 Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Awards, honoring individuals and organizations whose work exemplifies FDR’s vision of democracy. Click here to RSVP for the free public ceremony.

This latest outrage is just another symptom of an extreme anti-government ideology with roots dating back to the 1970s. The shutdown of the U.S. government is an outrageous act of ignorance, foolishness, and vindictiveness. History suggests that choosing destruction is usually tragic, but it’s hard to believe the Republican hardliners have any sense of history.

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. House GOP Debt-Ceiling Plan: Paul Ryan’s Losing Ideas from 2012 (The Nation) John Nichols notes that the laundry list of demands that Republican leaders put forth for raising the debt ceiling looks suspiciously like the Romney/Ryan economic agenda that voters soundly rejected just last year, though even

The Roosevelt Institute’s Bernard L. Schwartz Rediscovering Government Initiative, Roosevelt Institute | Pipeline, and the Roosevelt House Public Policy Institute recently convened a panel of local policy experts to discuss inequality in New York and how the next mayor can address it. Watch the video below.

Wall Street has responded well to Summers’s withdrawal, but Main Street would also be better off without an inflation hawk leading the Federal Reserve. The stock and bond markets should not be the only ones rejoicing at Larry Summers’s withdrawal from consideration to run the Federal Reserve. The nation’s workers should, too. Janet Yellen, the

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Years of Tragic Waste (NYT) As the anniversary of the Lehman Brothers collapse approaches, Paul Krugman reflects on the federal goverment’s abject failure to pump enough money into the economy to create the jobs Americans desperately need, either at the outset of the Great Recession or

Download the policy note (PDF) by Georgia Levenson Keohane

In a new policy note, Roosevelt Institute Fellow Georgia Levenson Keohane examines the policy and political implications of peer-to-peer financing. In recent years, crowdfunding has emerged as a financing model that allows smaller funders to invest in projects and organizations in their early stages – particularly those that would otherwise struggle to obtain capital. Peer-to-peer funding experiments first emerged in the nonprofit sector, but have since expanded to the realms of for-profit investment and political activism.

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Policy Note: Will Crowdfunding Kickstart an Investment Revolution? (Roosevelt Institute) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Georgia Levenson Keohane examines the proliferation of peer-to-peer financing models like Kickstarter and the questions they pose for policymakers who must balance their support for new business models with their desire to protect

Looking for a way to stimulate your mind in between barbecues and baseball games this Labor Day? We’ve asked staff and Fellows from across the Roosevelt Institute to provide their suggestions on books, films, poems, and other entertainment with a compelling and informative message about labor issues. Felicia Wong, President & CEO, Roosevelt Institute: 1) It

We’ve made progress on addressing many blatant injustices since 1963, but people of color still don’t have an equal opportunity to succeed. This week marks the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington. The Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s electrifying speech at that event was inspiring and unforgettable. Those remarks, combined with hundreds of thousands

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. The link between civil and economic rights (WaPo) Fifty years after the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, Harold Meyerson argues that the struggle for economic justice continues with striking fast food workers and their demands for better pay. With any luck, we won’t have

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Should Obama pick Larry Summers to head the Fed? (Politico) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal writes that while Ben Bernanke led the Fed through a crisis, his successor will need to build consensus and establish the central bank’s new normal. That’s a problem given that Summers

The Zimmerman verdict could spark a nationwide movement to challenge “self-defense” laws that support racism. Immediately following George Zimmerman’s acquittal on all charges brought against him for killing Trayvon Martin, mass protest began in the streets and on social media, evoking the great mobilizations for civil rights in American history. While many trials invite public

The cable giant’s program for low-income customers is touted as a solution to the digital divide, but it only distracts from the need for more regulation and competition. Regulatory failures and telecommunications market consolidation have left most Americans with few options when it comes to a high-speed Internet access connection at home. There is a

The controversial SB 5 is the latest case of the Texas GOP pushing anti-abortion measures that marginalize low-income women. Some 5,000 orange-clad men and women invaded the Texas capital in Austin on Monday in an emotional and enthusiastic show of support for reproductive rights. They faced off with Republican lawmakers still resolved to pass SB

Download the policy note (PDF) by Elizabeth Pearson

In a new policy note, Roosevelt Institute | Pipeline Fellow Elizabeth Pearson examines the factors that shape American attitudes toward taxation. She makes the case that public opinion about taxation is malleable and that progressives should focus on raising awareness of the purpose of taxation and the benefits taxes will produce rather than how they are designed.

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Will Immigration Reform Work for the U.S. Economy? (HuffPo) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Annette Bernhardt and Haeyoung Yoon argue that comprehensive immigration reform is not only the right thing to do, but a road to citizenship, worker protections, and smart integration of future immigrants would also provide

A Bold Approach to the Jobs Emergency brought together leading policymakers, thinkers, and activists to discuss how we can get the U.S. to full employment and create more good jobs, but that was only the beginning of the conversation. Our jobs conference in early June covered a wide variety of potential solutions to what we

This morning’s new jobs numbers contained few surprises, and given the mediocre, low-wage recovery the U.S. has experienced for the last few years, that’s a problem. On Tuesday, the Roosevelt Institute’s Rediscovering Government initiative hosted “A Bold Approach to the Jobs Emergency,” a daylong conference that discussed how this crisis of prolonged unemployment and underemployment came

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Telecom’s Big Players Hold Back the Future (NYT) David Carr profiles Roosevelt Institute Fellow Susan Crawford and explores her crusade against the telecom monopolies that offer high fees instead of high speeds. Every time you wait for a video to buffer, you’re experiencing the magic of

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Gatsby and the McJobs Rebellion (KC Star) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Dorian Warren notes that the new adaptation of The Great Gatsby is timed nicely with fast food and retail workers’ push for fairer wages. The story of unbridled greed keeps being retold, but this time they plan to write

Today’s leaders must recognize that job creation is the key to boosting revenues for the government and the people. Now, the rise and fall of national income—since they tell the story of how much you and I and everybody else are making—are an index of the rise and fall of national prosperity. They are also

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Four Better Ways to Spend the $55 Million Wasted on Votes to Repeal the Affordable Care Act (Think Progress) House Republicans will vote to repeal Obamacare for the 37th time today because they still haven’t found a genie to grant their wish, but Bryce Covert and Adam

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Creating an Economics for the 21st Century (Yahoo! Finance) Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Rob Johnson argues that the problem with much of modern economics is that it offers no useful guidance for society, instead treating messy human decisions and interactions as if they could all be

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Mexico’s Lucky to Have Just One Man Blocking Internet Equality. We’ve Got a Bunch (Wired) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Susan Crawford writes that Carlos Slim uses his Mexican telecom monopoly to extract billions from customers. In America, we’d never let one man have all that power —

Some people overhyped the influence of money in the last election, but we shouldn’t downplay the need for smart, effective reform. “We got way too excited over money in the 2012 elections,” my former colleague Ezra Klein said at a conference on inequality and politics at Yale last week, in remarks that he published as

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Student Debt and the Crushing of the American Dream (NYT) Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow and Chief Economist Joseph Stiglitz argues that in order to strengthen the recovery and remove the boot from the foreheads of Americans trying to climb the economic ladder, we need to rethink

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. What’s Wrong With the U.S. Job Market? (Businessweek) Peter Coy tries to answer the million-dollar question from the supply and demand angle, also noting solutions like Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Jeff Madrick’s call for companies to pay workers enough to buy their own products. Built-in marketing!

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Overthinking Obama (Washington Monthly) Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Mark Schmitt argues that while many authors try to construct a Grand Theory of Barack Obama, he’s really a typical democratic reformer, except that he a) got elected and b) did so during the worst possible economic moment.

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Budget austerity proved a joke, but the US and Europe won’t change course (Guardian) Dean Baker writes that despite recent setbacks, deficit hawks are making two arguments against a policy shift: the recovery’s getting stronger on its own (there, did you see? It twitched a little

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Dodd-Frank is finally being implemented. Will that be enough? (WaPo) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal argues that Brown-Vitter’s capital requirements could be a smart addition to Dodd-Frank even if the latter works well. Just because banks can fail doesn’t mean they should feel free to do

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. The Lessons of the North Atlantic Crisis for Economic Theory and Policy (IMFdirect) Roosevelt Institute Chief Economist Joseph Stiglitz argues that the crisis has given us a chance to rethink broken models, so instead of tinkering at the edges and hoping the markets somehow fix themselves, we

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. This Is How Wall Street Is Fighting the Brown-Vitter Bill (NY Mag) Kevin Roose writes that despite Brown-Vitter’s slim chances of passing, the fact that banks have already started freestyling their fear-mongering — how’s “too-big-to-fail is a good thing!” working for you? Okay, what if it’s

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. A Mortgage Agency Pick Is Likely to Cause Conflict (NYT) Peter Eavis and Annie Lowrey report that critics are displeased that the president is nominating Mel Watt, who supports mortgage writedowns to help struggling homeowners, to replace Ed DeMarco, who’s been doing his best pet rock

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. The studies behind austerity are weak. The study behind ‘uncertainty’ is worse. (WaPo) Ezra Klein notes that the “policy uncertainty is hurting the economy” meme is back in the headlines, and as Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal has shown, that’s apparently all the proof that the

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. The Next Elizabeth Warren (TNR) If you’ve ever been annoyed by your Internet provider, return the favor by reading John Judis’s profile of Roosevelt Institute Fellow Susan Crawford, who’s taking on the telecom giants and fighting to make high-speed Internet access as ubiquitous as electricity. The

A carbon tax would bring long-term rewards, but it will take leaders willing to make short-term sacrifices. We are at an unacknowledged turning point for the economy and the environment. We could, right now, substantially reduce our debt and deficit projections, take a major step toward a better environment, create a simpler and fairer tax

What is the Crash Generation?

Down but not out, Millennials who came of age during the Great Recession could reshape the American economy and society. The economy is personal. It colors our decisions about everything: when to have kids, what city to move to, who to vote for, who to sleep with. And nobody knows this better than the biggest

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. The great economic experiment of 2013: Ben Bernanke vs. austerity (WaPo) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal writes that U.S. economic policy has become a “punch me as hard as you can!” bar bet in which the Federal Reserve makes a big push to stimulate the recovery

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. The 1 Percent’s Solution (NYT) Paul Krugman argues that the embarrassing collapse of austerity’s intellectual justifications might not mean that austerity itself is over, since there isn’t a lot of deep thought involved in wealthy elites tapping policymakers on the shoulder and saying, “Hey, do this.”

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. The Poorly Attended Hearing on One of the Economy’s Toughest Problems (National Journal) If there’s a congressional panel on long-term unemployment and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound? Niraj Chokshi writes that the Joint Economic Committee might have discovered the answer

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Austerity doctrine is exposed as flimflam (WaPo) Katrina vanden Heuvel isn’t expecting an apology from the austerians who have pushed destructive policies based on bad information, but if they’d go stand in a corner and think about what they’ve done, at least it would get them

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. The Incredible Shrinking Budget Deficit (NYT) Annie Lowrey notes that Goldman Sachs economists predict the deficit will shrink dramatically due to lower spending and higher revenues. Pop the champagne and kiss your sweetheart; our long national nightmare is over. Now about that economic growth… Getting Back

Current and future leaders convened at Yale to explore a proactive approach to natural disasters. It’s been six months since Superstorm Sandy devastated the Northeast, but its impact can still be felt. Recently, members of the Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network held a conference at Yale University to consider the policy implications of the disaster.

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Reinhart/Rogoff-gate isn’t the first time austerians have used bad data (WaPo) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal notes an odd contradiction: Keynesians who favor more government intervention rely on market data, while austerians favor data from government sources they otherwise wouldn’t trust to tell them the time

The gun lobby may have won the latest legislative battle, but that doesn’t mean the American people should stop fighting for change. [W]e have learned lessons in the ethics of human relationships—how devotion to the public good, unselfish service, never-ending consideration of human needs are in themselves conquering forces. Democracy looks to the day when

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. The Excel Depression (NYT) Paul Krugman writes that Reinhart-Rogoff became the sacred text of the austerity movement, but they’ve been exposed as false prophets. Now policymakers will need to find some other thinly veiled excuse to keep doing what they were going to do anyway. Let

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. The Dis-Uniting of America (Robert Reich) Reich writes that while Americans still demonstrate their ability to come together and help one another when a sudden tragedy strikes, as it did in Boston, prolonged economic misery and soaring childhood poverty don’t seem to set off the same

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. The Great Debt Delusion: How Math Keeps Proving Austerity Wrong (The Atlantic) When will deficit hawks learn to Konczal-proof their research? First there was the Alesina-Ardagna paper. Roosevelt Fellows Mike Konczal and Arjun Jayadev poked holes in that one. Then Reinhart-Rogoff became the new holy grail.

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. A Tax System Stacked Against the 99 Percent (NYT) Lots of Americans view filing their taxes as a hassle, but as Roosevelt Institute Chief Economist Joe Stiglitz writes, the wealthiest Americans approach Tax Day like seasoned escape artists donning their straitjackets and stepping into the water

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. India’s Patently Wise Decision (Project Syndicate) Roosevelt Institute Chief Economist Joe Stiglitz and Arjun Jayadev praise the Indian Supreme Court’s decision to deny Novartis a patent on its cancer drug, noting that big pharma will survive with less revenue, but without affordable medicine, lots of people

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. A Budget Focus on Inequality (NYT) Annie Lowrey writes that President Obama’s latest budget reflects his oft-stated desire to protect and expand the middle class with measures like raising the minimum wage and funding universal preschool, i.e. the parts that aren’t pre-chewed for Republicans. Will Voters

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Sherrod Brown and David Vitter have a new bipartisan bill to end Too Big to Fail. Here’s what it does. (WaPo) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal breaks down the leaked Brown-Vitter bill that would significantly raise capital requirements but would throw out the barely established Basel

The New Deal left women behind, but it proved government can be a champion for the economically downtrodden. The participation of women in the American work force has expanded dramatically in the 78 years since the Roosevelt administration launched the WPA to provide jobs to Americans out of work and on relief. Today women comprise

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Why do people hate deficits? (WaPo) Suggesting America doesn’t need to balance its budget strikes a lot of people like saying bald eagle should be the main course at the next state dinner, but as Dylan Matthews writes, there’s no reason for us to consider deficit

The products of the WPA are all around us, but their history has been erased. The fact that the Works Progress Administration (WPA) is today remembered as an exceptional moment in American economic policy is evidence of the serious blind spots Americans have developed in the way we think about government. Even Millennials, who have

The WPA looks like a small investment by today’s standards, but it remade the country. There’s hardly a community in the United States without a park, bridge, school, or library constructed by the WPA. Just think of the built legacy right here in New York: Hunter’s College’s handsome mid-century modern building on Park Avenue; LaGuardia

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. How much money do you make? (WaPo) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal examines a question that complicates income inequality — partly because no one wants to answer it, but also because when liberals and conservatives are asked to show their work, they don’t even agree on

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Obama Budget Reviving Offer of Compromise With Cuts (NYT) Jackie Calmes reports that the president plans to reissue his final offer to John Boehner from last year’s deficit negotiations, including chained CPI and cuts to Medicare, though the GOP is still giving increased tax revenue the

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Bankers’ Court Wins Could Come Back to Haunt Them (Bloomberg) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal argues banks have figured out they don’t need Congress if they can get judges to rewrite or throw out reform — but even for Wall Street, there are some downsides to

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Lack of paid sick leave is unhealthy for America (WaPo) Katrina vanden Heuvel writes that after the success of local paid sick leave laws that have shown it’s easier to keep one’s business healthy when one’s employees aren’t forced to shuffle through the office with walking

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. The April Fool’s economy (WaPo) Ylan Q. Mui notes that while the economy seems to have picked up steam in the last few months, we’ve seen signs of strong early-year growth before only to be disappointed later. Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice,

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. How an anti-rentier agenda might bring liberals, conservatives together (WaPo) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal writes that left and right could find common ground in their efforts to stop the rich from extracting unearned income from land, copyrights, and other resources. Or they could just have

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Cheating Our Children (NYT) Paul Krugman writes that after repeatedly crying wolf about a looming economic disaster, deficit hawks instead claim we’re cheating future generations by taking on debt. Their answer, of course, is to cheat them now so they’re not so disappointed later. This is

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. The Consequences of a Leaderless Economy (Yahoo! Finance) Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Rob Johnson argues that America’s failure to lead and China and Germany’s resistance to change has left the global economy with a void at the top, though many in the financial sector consider themselves

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. The corporate ‘predator state’ (WaPo) Katrina vanden Heuvel argues that bipartisan agreement in Washington often means corporate interests have successfully bought off lawmakers on both sides, but there’s a real left-right alliance to be forged between workers and small business owners. For ‘Faster Growth,’ Soak the

By cutting off research funding for ideological reasons, Republicans in Congress have turned themselves into thought police. In a vote last Wednesday, the U.S. Senate took the unprecedented step of prohibiting the National Science Foundation (NSF) from funding political science research, except on topics “promoting national security or the economic interests of the United States.”

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. How to Create a Workplace That Fits Millennial America (Chief Learning Officer) Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network National Director Taylor Jo Isenberg explains why Millennials work best in settings that emphasize individual participation and agency and reward loyalty rather than treating them like the office’s latest coffee

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Financial Reform Is Being Dismantled. Why Doesn’t President Obama Seem to Care? (TNR) Jeff Connaughton writes that while President Obama may want to put Dodd-Frank behind him and move on to other business, Dodd-Frank’s opponents would also very much like to put it behind them, preferably

President Obama has talked about the need to “win the future” by investing in higher education, but based on the deep budget cuts states have made in recent years, it looks more like we’re trying to forfeit. A new report from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities finds that states are now spending 28 percent

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Day of Greed (Harper’s) Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Jeff Madrick responds to critics who think it’s an exaggeration for him to call the current era the Age of Greed by presenting a devastating collection of evidence: the morning business headlines from the Wall Street Journal. Is

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Singapore’s Lessons for an Unequal America (NYT) Roosevelt Institute Chief Economist Joseph Stiglitz writes that despite a growing class divide in the U.S., other comparable nations have demonstrated that it’s possible to combine social equity with strong economic growth. The key seems to be that you

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. The Missing Right: A Constitutional Right to Vote (Democracy Journal) Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellows Jonathan Soros and Mark Schmitt argue that we need a Right to Vote Amendment to focus the activist movement and help ensure that you can participate in our political system even if you

The partisan divide over the budget may seem unbridgeable, but there’s a deal to be had if both sides want it. I’ll open by acknowledging a considerable difference between my budget/fiscal policy hopes and my actual predictions. My hopes for the emergence of a doable centrist budget strategy from the Obama administration have never come

If Pope Francis raises his voice on behalf of the poor, he could deal the final blow to austerity economics. “Now faith is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen.” That’s a quote from the New Testament, but it’s easy to imagine many in Europe expressing the same sentiment today,

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. America’s Latest Phony Fiscal Crisis (Bloomberg) Simon Johnson writes that America really is exceptional. Unsatisified with run-of-the-mill fiscal crises driven by factors like high interest rates and rampant inflation, we went out and invented our own model based primarily on obstinance and spite. Grover Norquist’s Last

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Paul Ryan vs. the Middle Class (Bloomberg) Josh Barro writes that no matter how much soul-searching Republicans do, they won’t win over the American people if they keep pushing an economic agenda that would ruin their lives — especially not if the only rationale for doing

Millennials don’t want a government that just talks at them. They want to build it together. There is a paradox in the Millennial generation’s relationship with government. On the one hand, research shows that we firmly believe government can and should play a role in solving society’s most urgent and complex problems. We’re less interested

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. The World Has Its First Jesuit Pope. Will He Really Help the Poor? (MoJo) Erik Kain writes that despite Pope Francis’s unsurprising social conservatism, he does come from the wing of the Church that cares for the poor and opposes austerity — though he has something in

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Above the law (WaPo) Katrina vanden Heuvel argues that the combo of drone warfare and “too big to fail” contradicts the idea of the U.S. as a nation of laws, creating a system in which ordinary citizens may be blown up by remote control but criminal

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Paul Ryan’s make-believe budget (WaPo) Were you worried the Romney-Ryan ticket’s decisive loss to Obama meant Paul Ryan would no longer get to shape our fiscal debate? No need to fear; Ryan’s out with a new budget this week, and as Eugene Robinson writes, this one’s more

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Sen. Sherrod Brown explains why he wants to break up the big banks (WaPo) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal talks to the Ohio progressive about the need to end “too big to fail” and how it became something he and David Vitter can agree on — a

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. A Republican Magic Trick (Harper’s) Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Jeff Madrick argues that deficit hawks have mastered the art of distraction — but when they start pointing to shiny objects like the CBO’s dubious 20-year budget forecasts, you should check to make sure you still have

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. A way out of our budget wars (WaPo) Now that the House has passed a continuing resolution to fund the government, E.J. Dionne writes that President Obama is looking to strike a broader deal with Senate Republicans in the hope that even they are tired of

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Why There’s a Bull Market for Stocks and Bear Market for Workers (Robert Reich) Reich notes that while giddy market analysts treated yesterday’s Dow gains as a sign that happy days are here again, an economy’s health is measured by the well-being of its flesh-and-blood people,

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. The Sequester’s Hidden Danger (NYRB) Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Jeff Madrick argues the real danger of the sequester isn’t the cuts themselves but the dangerous mindset of austerity advocates who see the lemmings rushing off the cliff in Europe and think, “Oooh, I wonder what’s down

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Does Dodd-Frank really end ‘too big to fail’? (WaPo) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal examines the three biggest ongoing debates surrounding the financial reform law and whether it has really changed the system enough to keep it from blowing up in our faces or simply lengthened

FDR placed the needs of the American people above petty budgetary concerns, but today’s leaders lack his courage and vision. In 1933 we reversed the policy of the previous Administration. For the first time since the depression you had a Congress and an Administration in Washington which had the courage to provide the necessary resources

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. The Sequester and the Tea Party Plot (Robert Reich) Reich writes that the sequester is a product of the grander plans of radical Tea Party-ing conservatives who seek to breed fear, anger, and hate in order to win converts to their cause — which also happens

Republicans have issued so many absurd economic threats that one of them was eventually going to come true. Fingers are pointing in every direction as politicians and pundits assign blame for the automatic spending cuts that are scheduled to kick in tomorrow night. But in truth, it was a real team effort. And something this

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Conservatives Hindered by Ownership-Society Ideal (Bloomberg) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal argues that the GOP is still guided by its vision of an “ownership society” in which public risks are shifted onto private individuals. But having taken this model for a test drive, Americans can tell

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Sequestering common sense (WaPo) Katrina vanden Heuvel writes that with the sequester looming, all eyes in Washington are on the manufactured budget disaster, which saves deficit hawks the trouble of shouting “Hey, look over there!” when confronted with real problems like mass unemployment. 12 Ways the

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Lean In, Trickle Down: The False Promise of Sheryl Sandberg’s Theory of Change (Forbes) NND Editor Bryce Covert challenges the theory that simply having more women at the top will make things better for all women. Case in point: Yahoo! CEO Marissa Mayer, who just decreed that

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Eight Ways the Sequester Could Ruin Your Life (Daily Beast) Caitlin Dickson explains why your spring getaway should take place in a bunker with a well-stocked library and a freezer full of beef if the sequester takes effect. Though even if the sequester’s canceled, it doesn’t

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Sequester of Fools (NYT) Paul Krugman writes that two years after the quest for a grand bargain ended with the flame-out of the Simpson-Bowles commission, the only fiscal crisis we face isn’t the one they warned about, but the one that was designed to be a

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Budget Cuts Seen as Risk to Growth of U.S. Economy (NYT) Binyamin Appelbaum and Annie Lowrey report that forecasters predict the sequester will shave about half a percentage point off GDP, but policymakers intentionally designed the whole thing to have horrible consequences, so maybe it’s best

Opponents of a minimum wage increase imagine an economic reality very different from the one millions of American workers experience. The good news from last week is that President Obama called for raising the federal minimum wage – long overdue and desperately needed for low-wage workers who have seen their real earnings decline during the

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Homeless, Hungry, Hung Out to Dry (Prospect) With just over a week to go before Sequestration Day (Have you made your party plans yet? Bought the budget piñata for the kids?), NND Editor Bryce Covert looks at the people and programs that will be affected by

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Equal Opportunity, Our National Myth (NYT) Roosevelt Institute Chief Economist Joseph Stiglitz writes that the poor-but-economically-mobile girl described in President Obama’s State of the Union address is as much an American icon as Uncle Sam, but they’re both from the fictional side of the family. Raise

Instead of downplaying the role of government, we should recommit to a “spirit of charity.” We of the Republic sensed the truth that democratic government has innate capacity to protect its people against disasters once considered inevitable, to solve problems once considered unsolvable… In this we Americans were discovering no wholly new truth; we were

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Minimum Wage 101 (Prospect) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal talks to minimum wage scholar Arindrajit Dube about why President Obama’s new proposal to set the federal minimum to $9 an hour will help raise wages and increase job stability — except for minimum wage scholars. Why

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. No, Marco Rubio, government did not cause the housing crisis (WaPo) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal argues that Marco Rubio’s State of the Union response had problems that even a bigger bottle of Poland Spring couldn’t have fixed, like how it blamed the housing bubble on

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. In State of the Union, Obama calls for new paths to the middle class (WaPo) Zachary Goldfarb writes that the focus of President Obama’s economic proposals in last night’s speech was on addressing inequality of opportunity, so that everyone who works hard has the ability to

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. For Obama, State of the Union Means State of the People (Fiscal Times) Mark Thoma notes that while Eric Cantor says the GOP should be “talking about helping folks,” President Obama is the one who’s actually going to be laying out a plan to do that

Policy choices drove the Postal Service into debt, but we can still choose to save it. The news last week that the U.S. Postal Service plans to end Saturday delivery of regular mail provoked a wide range of reactions: anger from those who hope to prevent the cuts, praise from those who see it as

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. In State of the Union, Obama to return to jobs and the economy (WaPo) Scott Wilson reports that the president’s speech on Tuesday night will address the elephant in the room along with the several hundred smaller elephants who will sit in stony silence as he proposes

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. A Millennial Vision for a Millennial America (The Nation) Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network member Erik Lampmann explains how 1,000 young people came together to envision the government they want and the policies needed to create it. Now maybe they can give everyone else some pointers on

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. The Economic Challenge Ahead: More Jobs and Growth, Not Deficit Reduction (Robert Reich) Reich writes that deficit hawks are still getting to frame the debate in Washington, and they aren’t interested in using that power to push for solutions to real problems like unemployment or even

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Obama Urges Congress to Act to Stave Off Cuts (NYT) Michael Shear and Jackie Calmes report that the president wants Congress to pass a smaller package of cuts and tax increases to replace the sequester, hoping to take the edge off their desire to do something

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. What Would Jack Lew Do? (Prospect) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal writes that the next Treasury Secretary will be responsible for implementing financial reform and guiding it forward, but Obama’s pick has no record on these issues, so we’ll all get to experience the thrill of

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. The unemployment crisis that lies behind the US monthly jobs report (Guardian) Heidi Moore argues that even a relatively strong jobs report like the one published last week comes with an asterisk so large it makes everything else look like a footnote: namely, that America still

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Looking for Mister Goodpain (NYT) Paul Krugman writes that austerians continue to scour the globe for evidence that austerity has actually worked somewhere, only to encounter disappointment and heartbreak at every turn. But for now, heaven is a place on earth, and that place is Latvia,

New Deal Numerology: A Great Migration

This week’s numbers: 11.1 million; 900,000; 0.6%; $1.5 trillion; $25 billion 11.1 million… is a ubiquitous number. That’s how many undocumented immigrants currently live in the U.S. Deporting them all is the closest the GOP has gotten to proposing a public jobs program. 900,000… is a working number. That’s how many new jobs could be

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Government is hurting the economy — by spending too little (WaPo) In light of the report that the economy contracted in the last quarter of 2012 due partly to cutbacks, Ezra Klein notes that one man’s big government socialism is another man’s premature and destructive fiscal

In the latest episode of the Roosevelt Institute’s Bloggingheads series, Fireside Chats, Fellow Mike Konczal talks to Jacobin editor Seth Ackerman about Seth’s recent article “The Red and the Black,” which asks what kind of mechanisms would replace the pursuit of profit in a socialized economy. In the clip below, they discuss Seth’s proposal for

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. The Non Zero-Sum Society (Robert Reich) Reich argues that the wealthy should realize that they’re better off with a smaller piece of a bigger pie, but based on their efforts to crush unions, they seem to believe that the key to winning a pie-eating contest is

On Thursday, January 31, the Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network is celebrating the launch of Government By and For Millennial America, a new report on Millennial attitudes toward government and their proposals to reform it, with a discussion panel and reception in Washington, D.C. The report, a visionary publication that engaged over 1,000 young people

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Four Important Ways Immigration Reform Could Benefit America’s Economy (Think Progress) As Congress hashes out a bipartisan immigration deal, Travis Waldron notes that comprehensive reform would bring benefits like economic growth and higher wages. You can hear the rallying cries now: “They took our jobs! …And

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. The Fed Is More Out of It Than You Thought It Was (Bloomberg) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal argues that transcripts show the Fed failed to grasp that the economy was (and is) weak because consumers are worried about how they’re going to pay their bills,

One reason Congress is so dysfunctional is that wealthy lawmakers are insulated from everyday concerns like getting paid. This week, as part of a compromise to ward off a debt ceiling showdown and potential default, the House approved the No Budget, No Pay Act, which would withhold lawmakers’ paychecks starting April 15 unless they pass

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Deficit Hawks Down (NYT) Paul Krugman argues that President Obama’s second inaugural address gave the deficit exactly the weight it deserves by hardly mentioning it at all, in contrast to the hawks who have spent years trying to gin up a crisis through the power of

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. How to Get America Online (NYT) They stopped mailing out all those CDs/complimentary coasters, so… Wait, wrong AOL. Roosevelt Institute Fellow Susan Crawford explains how the FCC could expand high-speed Internet access and let us all leave that little running man in the dust. Here are

The president didn’t just make a case for big government; he argued that the government must adapt to meet its citizens’ needs. Almost hidden in President Obama’s second inaugural address was a key idea that received little if any attention. The focus has been on the president’s eloquent defense of collective government, and who couldn’t

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. The brilliantly stupid new plan to raise the debt ceiling without raising it (Salon) Alex Pareene examines the logic behind the House Republicans’ new plan to “suspend” the debt ceiling until May instead of voting to raise it, which allows them to fulfill the bare minimum

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Obama’s unapologetic inaugural address (WaPo) E.J. Dionne writes that like FDR, President Obama used his inaugural address to make a positive case for the role of government and collective action in America, and it revealed him to be what his opponents most feared — not a secret

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. The Dwindling Deficit (NYT) Paul Krugman argues that in the medium term, there is no deficit crisis to speak of, and in the long term, the future is just too unpredictable for us to solve our problems by having 2040’s budget debates today, unless Marty McFly

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. New Purpose of Government is Better Government (Bloomberg) Ezra Klein writes that when Republicans get tired of beating their heads against the walls of the welfare state, the scope of government’s responsibilities will finally be settled. But don’t worry; there will still be plenty of pointlessly

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Does America Need Jack Lew? (Harper’s) Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Jeff Madrick explains his concerns about Lew at Treasury: he’s hazy on what caused the financial crisis and overly concerned about budget deficits. In other words, he fits right in with the rest of the president’s

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Obama to Republicans: You Have No Choice but to Raise the Debt Ceiling (Prospect) Jamelle Bouie writes that President Obama used the final press conference of his first term to remind voters that he’s the one who’s just trying to pay the country’s bills while Republicans

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. The Tim Geithner Era (Slate) Matthew Yglesias looks back on the mixed record of Tim Geithner, the influential Treasury Secretary who seemingly only managed to convince one person that he had all the answers, but lucked out with that person being the President of the United States.

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Coins Against Crazies (NYT) Paul Krugman makes his case for minting the trillion-dollar platinum coin: it might sound like a big joke, but it’s better to find a way to laugh off the debt ceiling threat than to allow Republicans to turn the full faith and

President Obama can beat Republicans in the debt celing standoff by turning their own tactics against them. Not since Samuel L. Jackson announced his desire to have the snakes removed from his passenger flight has a single sentence thrilled the Internet as much as Chuck Todd’s question at yesterday’s White House press briefing: “Do you

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Obama’s Pick for Treasury Is Said to Be His Chief of Staff (NYT) Jackie Calmes reports that by tapping Jacob Lew to replace Tim Geithner at Treasury, President Obama continues to build his second-term team using the (white, male) members of his first-term team. Some of

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Shared sacrifice – except for CEOs (Reuters) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Matt Stoller writes that the fiscal cliff deal larded with corporate subsidies is just the latest manifestation of a lopsided tax system in which many companies owe their CEOs more than the IRS and the CEOs

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. The Post-Crisis Crises (Project Syndicate) Roosevelt Institute Chief Economist Joseph Stiglitz argues that policymakers shouldn’t let short-term conflicts like the fiscal cliff distract them from long-term problems like adapting to climate change. They’ll regret wasting their breath when everything’s underwater. Calling McConnell’s Bluff (Prospect) Robert Kuttner writes

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. The Hoax of Entitlement Reform (Robert Reich) There’s a growing consensus in Washington that we need to “reform” entitlements (in the same way that an axe reforms a tree) in order to rein in the deficit, but as Reich explains, that’s because it’s the easy answer,

Greg Smith’s tale of exile from Wall Street shows that even the rich can feel inadequate compared to the super-rich. Last winter, Bloomberg published a much-discussed account of belt-tightening in the brave new economy. Notable for featuring Wall Streeters, not Walmart greeters, the suffering depicted was sepia-toned. One poor soul described driving all the way

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. America Is Having the Wrong Fiscal Argument (Harper’s) Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Jeff Madrick argues three groups have created a pointless deficit frenzy: Tea Partiers, centrists with an austerity fetish, and the CBO, whose conservative assumptions are mistaken for neutral because the law says they must

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Susan Crawford appeared on MSNBC’s Up with Chris Hayes last weekend to discuss the problem with patents in our modern intellectual property-based economy. In the clip below, Susan explains that “the expensive, loony unreality” of many tech companies is that “all they’re doing is inventing patents, not patenting inventions. It seems backwards,

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. For Obama, a Victory That Also Holds Risks (NYT) David Leonhardt notes that while President Obama got most of what he wanted in the fiscal cliff deal, he also gave up most of his leverage on the debt ceiling and other future showdowns. The question is,

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Retrench Warfare (Prospect) The deal passed, the fiscal cliff has been averted for now, and Democrats… won? Kind of? Robert Kuttner explains why it’s hard to muster the enthusiasm for a full-on Snoopy Dance over the results of a battle we shouldn’t have been fighting in

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Either Way We’re Going Over the Cliff (NYRB) Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Jeff Madrick writes that even if we avoid full-fledged disaster, the compromises on the table will slow growth and prolong unemployment. But there are smarter approaches to the fiscal cliff than placing an air

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Obama and Boehner Diverge Sharply on Fiscal Plan (NYT) Boy, that escalated quickly! Boehner threw a trident. Jackie Calmes and Jonathan Weisman report that with talks breaking down, the House GOP will vote on the Speaker’s “Plan B” to show that they won’t compromise any futher

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Social Security: Will Obama Cave? (Prospect) Robert Kuttner argues that progressives must keep the pressure on President Obama instead of giving him cover to cut Social Security benefits in the fiscal cliff deal. Losing a foot instead of a leg doesn’t count as a win when

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. A Fiscal Deal Is Emerging — But Is It Any Good? (TNR) Jonathan Cohn reviews the plan chefs Obama and Boehner are cooking up behind closed doors, which includes ingredients that may leave a sour taste in both sides’ mouths, like higher taxes on those making over

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. That Terrible Trillion (NYT) Paul Krugman notes that fiscal conservatives often emphasize our $1 trillion deficit, as if the number alone should make liberals recoil like vampires at high noon, but their arguments are shakier when you take a closer look at the numbers that add

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Why is Washington Obsessing About the Deficit and Not Jobs and Wages? (Robert Reich) Reich notes that Democrats won the election in part by persuading voters that priority number one was job creation, not deficit reduction. And with that settled, policymakers are ready to dive right

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Citizen Coupon (Dissent) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal argues that the neoliberal and conservative push to voucherize the welfare state ensures we get the low-quality, off-brand version of public goods. Ten percent off your next doctor’s visit with your purchase of a six-pack of Shasta! How

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. The Lansing-Beijing connection (WaPo) Harold Meyerson argues that Michigan Republicans share more in common with China’s Communist Party than they might think: despite a growing gap between profits and wages, they both view unions as a threat to their political regime. Also, they wear a lot

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. The Real Battle Over Inequality Is Happening in the Heartland (Robert Reich) Robert Reich argues that when we treat the political debate like a twist-filled soap opera about Barack Obama, John Boehner, and the fiscal cliff that drives them apart, we’re missing a more important story

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. It’s Official: Austerity Economics Doesn’t Work (New Yorker) John Cassidy writes that Britain’s Conservatives have experimented with austerity using the citizens of the UK as their lab rats, and the result has been economic disaster. All due respect to the scientific method, we don’t need the

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. America’s Hope Against Hope (Project Syndicate) Roosevelt Institute Chief Economist Joseph Stiglitz argues that progressives can hope the next four years will see real action on inequality, unemployment, corruption, and climate change, but it’s more likely that “It could have been worse” will become our serenity

Senate Republicans passed up an opportunity for the U.S. to lead because of half-baked arguments and conspiracy theories. You wake early in the morning to the sound of your doorbell ringing, followed by a heavy knock on the front door. Bolting up in bed, you hear the ominous whir of a helicopter’s blades circling above

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Cliff Notes on the Three Real Perils Ahead (Robert Reich) Reich argues that the fiscal cliff is more like a big pit Congress has dug for itself, but lawmakers are also marching blindly toward disaster on child poverty, rising health care costs, and climate change. Are

The election is over, but the work of expanding and improving women’s access to quality health care is just beginning. Last month, the United Nations declared access to family planning to be a universal human right that all member countries should respect, protect, and fulfill—a decidedly non-controversial concept for most of the developed world, and

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Resistance (on Tax Rates) Is Futile (Prospect) Jamelle Bouie writes that Republicans have begun to realize that holding out to the bitter end on tax cuts for the rich will get them nothing but bad P.R., but even a grand bargain on President Obama’s terms wouldn’t

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Boehner tries to call a mulligan (WaPo) Ezra Klein notes that John Boehner’s fiscal cliff proposal is essentially what he offered in 2011 before Republicans bet they could do better and scrapped the deal. But they didn’t like what was behind door number two, so they’d

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Organizing McDonalds and Walmart, and Why Austerity Economics Hurts Low-Wage Workers the Most (Robert Reich) Reich writes that high unemployment makes unionizing to fight rising inequality more difficult, and focusing on deficit reduction over job creation only compounds the problem. It’s nothing personal, though — that

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. McJobs Should Pay, Too (The Atlantic) Sarah Jaffe looks at New York’s fast food chain strike and writes that while burger-flippers have always been at the bottom of the economic totem pole, the growth of low-wage service jobs (and the ever-present threat of hamburglary) demands a

New Deal Numerology: The Long Way Down

This week’s numbers: 16 million; 10; $2,200; $1.25 trillion; 53% 16 million… is a memetic number. That’s how many hits Google produces for “fiscal cliff,” making it far more common than more accurate terms like the fiscal slope or the austerity bomb. In the spirit of Grand Bargains, can we agree on “the fisterity cliffsplosion”?

In the latest episode of the Roosevelt Institute’s Bloggingheads series, Fireside Chats, Fellow Mike Konczal talks to Yale JD/PhD candidate Jeremy Kessler about the intersection of the law and the left and about leftists who dissent from mainstream progressivism. In the clip below, they discuss whether the Occupy movement, which Mike says has “made a

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Is Wal-Mart the enemy? (Salon) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Matt Stoller reports back from the Walmart protests and argues that while the company has no defense, it also has little to worry about as long as even the workers demanding more money think of its stores as a

Capping federal spending at 21 percent of GDP is arbitrary, short-sighted, and wrong for America. The Simpson-Bowles budget balancing plan seems to have become the common-sense standard for dealing with America’s future budget deficits. I’d say this move toward the right is dangerous to the future of the nation and essentially cruel—far more dangerous than

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. When talk was of investing in public good (Reuters) Roosevelt Institute | Pipeline Fellow Elizabeth Pearson warns that Grover Norquist should think twice about pointing to the states as a policy model, since the mad scientists in the laboratories of democracy have a history of supporting

A group devoted to reducing the deficit shouldn’t embrace the irresponsible tax cuts that created most of it. “Fix the Debt,” as you’ve probably noticed from the Internet ads that are now as ubiquitous as the old Netflix pop-ups, is the newest high-profile effort by Peter G. Peterson and allies to build a public movement

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Why is the White House’s Council of Economic Advisers Helping the Republicans? (Robert Reich) Reich writes that the president’s fiscal cliff leverage comes from tax policy being automatically reset to a saner baseline come January, but a report on the dire consequences suggests that his team may

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. With Biggest Strike Against Biggest Employer, Walmart Workers Make History Again (The Nation) Josh Eidelson reports that Walmart workers and organizers pulled off the biggest strike in U.S. history as hundreds walking off the job and a thousand protests throughout the country gave the super-store chain a

Republicans are using the fiscal cliff to extract payback for all the “gifts” President Obama has given to Americans. Before Americans have even finished digesting their Thanksgiving turkey, the holiday shopping season will have officially begun. But according to Mitt Romney, Christmas came early for those who voted for Barack Obama. The failed Republican presidential

In order to sustain the progressive coalition that re-elected President Obama, we can create spaces for civic engagement among young Americans at the local level. Young voters surprised pundits and Republicans again this year as we turned out in record numbers to vote, joining key constituencies including African Americans, Hispanics, and women to reelect President

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. A Chance to Tackle Inequality (NYT) Eduardo Porter suggests that before fiscal cliff negotiators begin patting themselves on the back for working out a bipartisan compromise to shrink the safety net, they should consider whether it needs to be made bigger to catch everyone who’s falling.

The Missing Living Wage Agenda

As part of our series “A Rooseveltian Second Term Agenda,” a long-term plan to provide justice on the job for all workers. Now that the election is over, our hope is that we can finally move beyond the vacuous invocations of an imaginary middle class where everyone is in the same boat. It’s time to

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. The Great Society’s Next Frontier (Prospect) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal writes that Obamacare has finally completed the safety net America should have had last century. But if we dare to bring it all the way into the present day, it’s time to focus on greater

What Do We Get Out of Government?

“Let us not be afraid to help each other — let us never forget that government is ourselves and not an alien power over us.” FDR said those words in Marietta, Ohio in July 1938, but it’s just as relevant today. As conservatives continue to deride every attempt to create progressive change through government as

As part of our series “A Rooseveltian Second Term Agenda,” advice on revamping the tax code to raise the revenue we need. Our current tax system is a toxic legacy of the George W. Bush years. It loomed over Obama’s first four years, bearing deficits that limited the scope of economic stimulus, drove inequality to

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Obama and the end of decline (WaPo) E.J. Dionne writes that President Obama’s second term has the potential to dispel the widely shared concern that America is caught in an escapable downward spiral — but only by addressing rising inequality and helping those Americans who actually

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Fiscal Cliff: The End Game (Prospect) Robert Kuttner notes that President Obama is holding firm on taxes and edging away from Social Security cuts, but he argues that fixing the economy is the key to fixing the deficit, while the GOP’s approach would have the horse

New Deal Numerology: Unfinished Business

This week’s numbers: 48; 3.4 million; 2%; 23; 87 48… is an edgy number. That’s how many days are left before the fiscal cliff kicks in. President Obama hopes a compromise can be reached now that Republicans know they’ll have four more years to make him miserable rather than packing it all into the next

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. The Poor Will Be the First Over the Fiscal Cliff (The Nation) NND Editor Bryce Covert explains how the combination of higher taxes and spending cuts will hurt the most vulnerable and argues that piling the poor up so high at the base of the fiscal

As part of our series “A Rooseveltian Second Term Agenda,” a reminder that creating more good jobs must be the president’s top priority. The presidential victory of Barack Obama was an important vindication for the uses of government. The small-government ideologues were defeated, but now the nation must go farther and recognize government is indeed a

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Why We Should Go Over the Fiscal Cliff (Time) Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Mark Schmitt argues that despite the scary connotations of calling something the “fiscal cliff,” we shouldn’t be afraid to take the plunge, since we’re not exactly standing high atop the peaks of rational

All Aboard the Pro-Government Bandwagon

Cracks are beginning to show in conservatives’ opposition to government, but progressives still need to make the case for higher tax revenues. So now everyone is climbing aboard the government-is-necessary bandwagon. I use as my litmus tests David Brooks and Ross Douthat, conservative op-ed columnists of The New York Times. To myself and my colleagues, who

As part of the “Millennial Priorities for the First 100 Days” series, a call for President Obama to finish the health care overhaul he began with the Affordable Care Act. While the principle focus of this year’s presidential campaign was clearly the economy, the election carried more profound implications for the future of American health

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. The President’s Opening Bid on a Grand Bargain: Aim High (Robert Reich) Reich argues that if President Obama wants to capitalize on his newfound leverage in the fiscal negotiations, he needs to make an ambitious push for top earners to pay more, not just a humble request

Despite conservative anti-tax rhetoric, American voters have a history of supporting higher taxes to fund government-led progress. How do Americans really feel about taxes? Anti-tax groups and limited-government activists are quick to invoke a long American tradition of tax revolt and resistance in making the case that aversion to taxes is as American as apple

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Let’s Not Make a Deal (NYT) Paul Krugman argues that after a decisive victory, President Obama shouldn’t give in to the House GOP’s “heads we win, tails you lose” strategy on the fiscal cliff and fall back into the role of economic hostage negotiator as he’s

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Obama’s Next Economy (Robert Reich) President Obama’s first honeymoon period was more of a brief working vacation, and he already faces some tough choices after winning reelection. Robert Reich argues that in his approach to the economic debate, he should choose progressivism. Back to Work, Obama

President Obama won a second term. How did he get there? And what should he do now? Roosevelt weighs in. Thomas Ferguson, Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow, Professor of Political Science, University of Massachusetts, and Contributing Editor, AlterNet: Now that it’s over, it’s time to take stock. All counts are incomplete, but something like 116 million

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Obama Beats Back the Right-Wing Tide (MoJo) David Corn writes that after the ugly midterms, President Obama decided the only way to win reelection with the highest unemployment rate since FDR was to make it a clear ideological choice rather than a referendum. Luckily, Romney volunteered

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. FDR and the fight to defend our freedom (WaPo) Katrina vanden Heuvel contrasts FDR’s call for freedom of speech, freedom of worship, freedom from want, and freedom from fear with the modern GOP’s vision of freedom, which involves a wealthy CEO and a bishop with an

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Unemployment Ticks Up — And That’s a Good Thing (Prospect) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal explains that the slight increase in unemployment in the latest jobs report is an indication that more people are starting to believe the economy is growing enough that there just might

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. America’s Global Election (Project Syndicate) Roosevelt Institute Chief Economist Joseph Stiglitz argues that the rest of the world has good reason to hope Barack Obama wins reelection: America serves as a model for other nations, but Mitt Romney’s version is likely to be more of a

New Deal Numerology: Storm Watch

This week’s numbers: $50 billion; 6 million; 3; 73%; $878 million $50 billion… is a disastrous number. That’s how much Hurricane Sandy is projected to cost due to property damage and lost economic activity. Rather than asking the federal government to get lost, local officials are begging it to make room under its umbrella. 6

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Romney’s Public Disservice (The Nation) Katrina vanden Heuvel notes that while public workers have been saving lives in the wake of Hurricane Sandy, Mitt Romney claims we’d be better off if we privatized FEMA. But what if the 1% wind up like movie stars arguing over

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. The Final Days, the Biggest Issue, and the Clearest Choice (Robert Reich) Reich writes that as we enter the home stretch of the 2012 election, the question at the center of it all is not what the latest Gallup tracking poll says or whether we need

Employers are already treating their workers like their subjects. Now some of them get to collect taxes, too. Though a lot of Americans really (really, really) hate paying taxes, most of us can at least justify it as our contribution to some greater good, whether it’s the broad range of social programs favored by progressives

What Do We Get Out of Government?

“Let us not be afraid to help each other — let us never forget that government is ourselves and not an alien power over us.” FDR said those words in Marietta, Ohio in July 1938, but it’s just as relevant today. As conservatives continue to deride every attempt to create progressive change through government as

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Obama says he’ll renew pursuit of ‘grand bargain,’ offering specifics on agenda (WaPo) In an off-and-on-the-record interview, the president outlined his second-term plans for a bipartisan debt deal that would trade $2.50 of spending cuts for every dollar in new taxes, indicating that he still thinks

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Mitt Romney’s Question-Mark Economy (Robert Reich) Reich notes that the GOP continues to bemoan the “uncertainty” caused by President Obama’s economic policies, but when it comes to learning the details of Romney’s plans, voters are treated like kids eagerly waiting to unwrap their gifts on Christmas

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. A Good Debate, But Will Voters Notice? (Prospect) Robert Kuttner argues that President Obama won the final debate with a mix of facts and zingers while Mitt Romney agreed to agree, but with voters still focused on the economy, saving foreign policy for last may have

We all know the conservative talking points about government: Big government impedes growth. Social Security is going bankrupt. We need to balance the budget. We’ve had the idea that government is an economic albatross drilled into our heads through decades of repetition. The problem is, it’s just not true. Check out this new booklet from the

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. The Secret of Our Non-Success (NYT) Paul Krugman argues that the evidence shows our prolonged economic slump has been the typical result of a severe financial crisis, but the Romney camp favors the explanation that Obama is an evil sorceror whose curse only Mitt’s purification spell

This week’s numbers: 58%; 3%; 1; 4; 27% 58%… is a mixed number. That’s how many CNN viewers thought Romney would do a better job of handling the economy after the second debate. They heard him say “I know what it takes” so many times, they just assume he’ll tell them the secret one day.

On the latest episode of the Roosevelt Institute’s Bloggingheads series, Fireside Chats, NND Editor Bryce Covert talks to Nancy Folbre, economist at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and editor of For Love and Money: Care Provision in the United States.

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Political Causes, Political Solutions (NYT) Roosevelt Institute Chief Economist Joseph Stiglitz explains how America’s bad policy choices have led to rising inequality and economic instability and provides an answer key for the choices we face moving forward. And yes, this will all be on the final

The president found his voice in the second debate, but he still needs to make a clearer case for the progress he’s made. There has been entirely too much celebrating about President Obama’s debate performance on Tuesday. He did very well, without a doubt. He won hands down. He didn’t get into the ring cold,

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Romney goes from Etch a Sketch to sketchy (WaPo) E.J. Dionne writes that President Obama called out Mitt Romney in the second debate for having nothing to back up his tax plan except his own promises that the math works. Is it too much to expect

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Obama’s Very Good Night — In Four Key Moments (TNR) Jonathan Cohn argues that even beyond Mitt Romney’s unforced error on Libya, President Obama won last night’s debate by defending his record, poking holes in Romney’s tax plan, and reminding voters that his opponent thinks half

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Obama’s chance to stand for Main Street (WaPo) Harold Meyerson argues that in order to win tonight’s presidential debate, Barack Obama will have to be a better advocate for himself than he was last time around, and it would help if “himself” was a populist guy

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. The Self-Destruction of the 1 Percent (NYT) Chrystia Freeland argues that wealthy elites are establishing an American oligarchy like the kind FDR warned about, and the problem isn’t just that they put self-interest before the common good. They don’t even seem to understand what’s good for

After two debates, progressives are left with more questions than answers about the fate of one of our most important social programs. It’s been a few decades since then-House Speaker Tip O’Neill first referred to Social Security as “the third rail of American politics,” but judging from the way the candidates in this election have

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Richard Milhous Ryan: No Specifics, Just a ‘Secret Plan’ (The Nation) John Nichols writes that Joe Biden kept the pressure on Paul Ryan to cough up details, but when asked to explain how his running mate’s tax plan would work, the best the GOP’s top wonk

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Walmart’s Black Friday ultimatum (Salon) Josh Eidelson reports that Walmart strikers have upped the stakes by threatening to walk out on the biggest shopping day of the year, cementing Black Friday as the worst case of mass chaos in a shopping center that doesn’t involve a

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Full Employment Is the Best Social Program (Prospect) With unemployment below 8 percent for the first time in three years, Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal looks ahead at what happens when it drops low enough that some liberal economists start preemptively using their feet for target

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Truth About Jobs (NYT) Paul Krugman argues that Friday’s jobs report shows genuine improvement in the economy since last year, but instead of celebrating the news that more Americans are finding jobs, Republicans are distraught that it might help President Obama keep his. Why a President

This week’s numbers: 11; 27; 37; 4; 10.3 million 11… is an incurious number. That’s how few questions moderator Jim Lehrer asked during Wednesday’s 90-minute debate, though he posed hard-hitting follow-ups such as “The role of government. Your view?” and “Why is this happening? Is this real life?” 27… is a deceptive number. That’s how

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Monetary Mystification (Project Syndicate) Roosevelt Institute Chief Economist Joseph Stiglitz argues that we shouldn’t take enthusiasm for QE3 as a sign that the Fed can shoulder the whole burden of the recovery. It’s a sign that Congress has dropped its end and run off aimlessly into

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Romney’s personality shift (WaPo) E.J. Dionne writes that President Obama struggled to put Mitt Romney on the defensive in last night’s debate as the Republican reinvented himself in real time. Don’t like his tax policy? Don’t worry, he brought a spare. Regulations? He’s pro-good ones! Taking

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. ‘The American Dream Has Become a Myth’ (Spiegel) Roosevelt Institute Chief Economist Joseph Stiglitz explains how Europe can save itself with more of itself and why our growing economic divide and a predatory, unchecked financial sector have significantly lowered America’s exchange rate of rags to riches.

Download the paper (PDF) by Mark Schmitt

This paper presents a research agenda for journalists, activists, and reformers, highlighting the biggest issues regarding how money really works in our political system, what its effects are, and how that’s changing in the post-Citizens United era aside from the soaring top-line numbers.

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Wednesday’s Presidential Debate and Friday’s Jobs Report (Robert Reich) Reich argues that no matter how many sick burns the candidates drop on each other tomorrow night, the real story is going to be how many jobs the economy added in September and whether anyone has a

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Obamanomics: A Counterhistory (NYT) David Leonhardt argues that the real flaw in the Obama team’s response to the economic crisis was not its failure to will a larger stimulus into existence or convince the public not to get its hopes up, but looking at a weak,

Instead of establishing a fair baseline for rich taxpayers, House Republicans want to let the rich chip in whatever they want. Last October, President Obama introduced the so-called “Buffett Rule,” a tax provision that would require multimillionaires to pay a minimum 30 percent effective tax rate. It was named for the Oracle of Omaha himself,

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Econ Indicators: Good News and Bad News (On the Economy) Jared Bernstein notes that revised BLS data shows the economy produced more jobs and less growth than we thought, and that President Obama is now a net job creator, which probably isn’t good enough to start breaking

Americans hold our system of government up as a model for other nations, but we show contempt for it at home.   In this electoral season, the role of government in the United States has become an important issue. Surveys reveal that most Americans don’t like government, especially the federal government. (State and local governments

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Repackaging Mitt as a Compassionate Conservative? It’s Too Late (Robert Reich) Reich writes that Mitt Romney is trying to reignite his fizzling presidential campaign and alter his aloof millionaire image by emphasizing to voters that he feels their pain, but if that’s true, the policy responses he’s

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. A Gaffe Is When a Republican Tells the Truth (The Nation) From “47 percent” to “legitimate rape,” the GOP has developed a terminal case of foot-in-mouth disease, but NND Editor Bryce Covert argues these memes aren’t a distraction from the issues. Their issues just happen to

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. What Will Obama Do About Income Inequality? Not Much. (Prospect) Jamelle Bouie writes that while President Obama has positioned himself as the candidate of the 99 percent, he hasn’t really offered a plan for reducing inequality. But he has a plan to keep it from getting

The Recession Ends. Then What?

It may be hard to imagine, but (we all hope, anyway) some day the recession and meager recovery period will come to an end. At that point, will the debates we’re having now about the economy become completely irrelevant? What will we have to fight about? Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal and EPI’s Josh Bivens

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. What Mitt Romney Really Represents (Robert Reich) Reich writes that our wealthiest presidents, like FDR, have always been champions of the less fortunate, while Romney just seems to want to make sure the concentration of power in government is consistent with the concentration of power in

Shifting health care costs onto seniors will break a social compact that all Americans rely on. With Election Day finally in sight, the last few weeks have been brimming with slogans, speeches, and sound bites. But while Republicans and Democrats are working from a similar playbook, there’s a gaping chasm between their competing visions of

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Fallacies of Romney’s logic (USA Today) Roosevelt Institute Chief Economist Joseph Stiglitz examines the flawed reasoning in Mitt Romney’s 47 percent remarks, like the fact that America is a community built to help the less fortunate, not a game show where those who come in last

Expanding high-speeding Internet access to all Americans is as essential now as the Rural Electrification Act was in the 1930s. The basic facts are familiar: of a nation of 314 million Americans, 100 million of us lack high-speed access to the Internet. We’re behind 15 other countries when it comes to that high-speed access; none

Susan Crawford

Roosevelt Institute Profile

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. What the Heck is Quantitative Easing? (Prospect) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal uses his words instead of his gifs for this explainer of QE3 and why it’s designed to appease two camps: the “please take some more free money” camp and the “for the love of God,

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. The Great American Tax Debate (NYT) Eduardo Porter writes that skepticism about taxes is as distinctly American as a NASCAR driver eating a deep-fried Twinkie, but that may be because taxpayers in other countries don’t have to hire a research team to help figure out what

The Theory of the Moocher Class

The conservative narrative of the “entitlement society” ignores the fact that most Americans are both givers and takers. As David Brooks points out, Mitt Romney’s remarks describing 47 percent of the population as, in effect, moochers who would vote for Obama because they got government benefits were not “off the cuff,” as he described them

Americans who rely on government programs aren’t “takers.” They’re people who have been left behind by our economy. Mitt Romney’s “off-the-cuff” remarks that nearly half of Americans are “dependent” on government and believe they are “victims” who are “entitled to health care, to food, to housing, to-you-name-it,”  were widely publicized. This is in fact old saw

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Secret Video: Romney Tells Millionaire Donors What He REALLY Thinks of Obama voters (MoJo) David Corn reveals video of Romney dismissing 47 percent of the country as moochers addicted to entitlements like, uh, food. Since the poor have it so good, he really made the ultimate sacrifice

We may want more democratic control over the Federal Reserve, but its independence is allowing it to push back against austerity. The Federal Reserve’s recent announcement of aggressive new policies is more than a little welcome. It involved a new round of quantitative easing focused on mortgage-backed securities, but more importantly, a statement that the

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Hating on Ben Bernanke (NYT) Paul Krugman argues that the QE3 announcement showed Ben Bernanke is willing to change course in response to criticism, while the right’s response showed the crazy train is chugging full steam ahead and Mitt Romney is hitching a ride in the

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Ben Bernanke rescues the US economy from the nihilism of the right (Guardian) Robin Wells writes that after putting up with the GOP’s attempts to bully him into submission, last week’s jobs report was finally bad enough to make Ben Bernanke declare, “You’re gonna make me

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. How Paul Ryan Would Decimate the New Deal (The Nation) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal and NND Editor Bryce Covert explain that by block granting Medicaid, voucherizing Medicare, and privatizing Social Security, Ryan’s Path to Prosperity would leave the poor in the Ditch of Don’t Give

Michigan, once the industrial capital of the United States, has the opportunity to create jobs and economic opportunity while paving the way forward for a clean energy future.  In 2008, the state of Michigan made a commitment to clean energy, to the environment, to economic opportunity, and – most of all – to people. Public

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. The Complete Guide to America’s Jobs Crisis and the Failure of Monetary Policy Using Animated Gifs (Business Insider) If the title alone isn’t enough to make you click, it’s written by Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal, and it’s almost certainly the only place you’ll ever see

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. In Standoff, Latest Sign of Unions Under Siege (NYT) Steven Greenhouse writes that the Chicago teachers strike is about more than local concerns. It’s about teachers unions holding their ground in the national school reform conflict even when their traditional Democratic allies have deserted or defected. Dems

We’ve all heard the standard arguments about the stimulus: progressives think it should have been bigger, while conservatives think it was a pork-filled monstrosity. But in the latest episode of the Roosevelt Institute’s Bloggingheads series, Fireside Chats, Mike Konczal talks to Michael Grunwald, author of The New New Deal, about four stronger criticisms of the

The president’s convention speech focused on the power of community, but the details of his future policies remain sketchy at best. The president’s acceptance speech in Charlotte last week emphasized his new theme of community and “being in this together.” For all its mushy sentiment, this is a major victory for those like us at

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. The Biggest Economic Challenge of Obama’s Second Term (Robert Reich) Reich writes that the weak jobs report shows the real economic story is not about who’s to blame, but who has a better plan to move forward. And while Romney reads from the dusty tome of

This week’s numbers: 60; 45; 10; 26; 15 60… is a predestined number. That’s how many years it’s been since either party had a brokered convention in which its candidate was not chosen by the first ballot. And the last candidate to win afterward was FDR, which was step one in his plan to make

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Obama’s hope and change 2.0 (WaPo) E.J. Dionne writes that President Obama’s speech sought to dispel any lingering notion that changing the country was ever going to be an easy lift. Instead, it argued that if we all put our backs into it, we might just

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. “We’re all in this together” (Salon) Joan Walsh writes that Bill Clinton’s speech was a call for solidarity both in our economic policy and within the Democratic Party, laying out how Obama has played the hand he was dealt and the choice voters face in November in

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. The Democrats’ Declaration of Interdependence (Prospect) Harold Meyerson argues that the first night of the DNC offered a stark contrast to the GOP’s themes: Go ahead and fantasize about your Randian paradise of individualist supermen all you want; the rest of us will be over here trying

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Mitt Romney’s Fair Share (Project Syndicate) Roosevelt Institute Chief Economist Joseph Stiglitz argues that Romney’s antipathy toward taxes reflects the GOP’s disregard for public goods, and it’s a problem when he’s running to be the chief executive of all the stuff he doesn’t want to pay for.

The New New Deal isn’t just another book about the White House or Congress. It tells the story of what happens when laws are passed and governing begins. What’s the best book about the Obama administration, particularly on domestic policy? A few months ago, I would have recommended Noam Scheiber’s The Escape Artists, but The

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Romney’s Closing, Obama’s Opening (TNR) Jonathan Cohn writes that Mitt Romney’s acceptance speech last night faulted President Obama for failing to live up to expectations, but it left him vulnerable if Obama lays out a more detailed economic recovery plan than: 1. Get elected. 2. ??? 3.

The Republican platform calls for repealing student loan reform so private lenders can get a bigger piece of the pie. Since health care reform was passed in March 2010, Republicans have railed against the individual mandate and imaginary death panels. But they’ve also been seething over a lower-profile part of the package called the Student

Paul Ryan may have a reputation as a truth-teller, but his convention speech was far from the truth. Honest? Intellectual? Neither quality was on display last night when Paul Ryan gave his first major national speech to America and provided red meat to his fellow Republican conventioneers. Profoundly sarcastic about Barack Obama, taking one rhetorical

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. With Ryan Speech, Romney Campaign Goes Full Tea Party (MoJo) David Corn writes that Paul Ryan’s fiery and misleading convention speech signaled that the GOP ticket has drunk the Kool-Aid and will make no effort to appeal to voters in the middle who might not feel

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Extremism in defense of Gilded Age privilege (WaPo) Katrina vanden Heuvel writes that staring down a hurricane has proved to be enough to make even hardened anti-government Republicans blink, but real-world wisdom need not apply in the right-wing wish list they’ve adopted as their platform. Platform’s

“We built this” is the phrase ringing throughout the (largely publicly funded) Tampa Bay Times Forum this week at the Republican National Convention. Though it is meant as a rebuttal to President Obama’s remarks earlier this summer emphasizing that government is the dynamic foundation and support system upon which all Americans rely, its use as

In the latest episode of the Roosevelt Institute’s Bloggingheads series, Fireside Chats, NND Editor Bryce Covert talks to National Review‘s Ramesh Ponnuru about what’s behind the gender wage gap. Their discussion began with a recent Bloomberg View column in which Ramesh argued that there may be factors other than discrimination, such as career choices, that account for

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Identity Politics Revisited (Washington Monthly) Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Mark Schmitt reviews a new book that challenges the idea that social issues are a distraction for the left. Economic messages are usually stronger if they’re not geared toward a nondescript department store mannequin. Romney Cribs from

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Romney’s First 100 Days (NYT) In 2008, Barack Obama famously promised change you could believe in. But David Leonhardt writes that if the Romney/Ryan Republicans win this year, their lurch toward small government and laissez faire economics could bring change you won’t believe. You Are Probably

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Poverty’s Up, Yet Still on the Back Burner (Policy Shop) Bob Herbert writes that policymakers from both parties seem to have surrendered in the war on poverty, but the 100 million Americans who have become the forgotten POWs of that conflict still have the power to

This week’s numbers: 51%; 85%; 2.3%; 87%; 62% 51%… is a diminished number. That’s how many Americans were part of the middle class in 2011, according to the Pew Research Center. That’s down 10% since 1971 and represents the only way the U.S. has slimmed down in the middle since then. 85%… is a struggling

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. CBO: If nothing changes, we’re in for another recession (WaPo) Dylan Matthews flags new CBO projections that show plunging over the fiscal cliff would have mixed results. On the one hand, the deficit hawks could stop circling over our heads. On the other, we’re headed for a

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Has Obama Made the Job Situation Worse? (NYT) Robert McElvaine notes that Paul Ryan claims the president inherited a tough situation and made it worse, which only makes sense if you believe that 417,000 God-fearing Republican job losses a month are better than 155,000 Kenyan socialist job

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. The worst case against the Obama administration (WaPo) Ezra Klein explains how Niall Ferguson went head-to-head with Paul Krugman and suffered a concussion. But Ferguson claims his Newsweek cover story isn’t full of lies; it’s all just, you know, attempts to trick readers into believing things

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Cautious Moves on Foreclosures Haunting Obama (NYT) Binyamin Appelbaum writes that the housing market Obama expected to recover along with the economy has instead proved to be his biggest challenge, and leaving underwater homeowners adrift may wind up sinking his chances for reelection. Paul Ryan’s plan

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Why Romney’s Choice of Ryan Won’t Help America Debate the Big Issues (Robert Reich) Reich writes that it’s hard to have a serious discussion of the issues when the GOP ticket either doesn’t have any plans or refuses to explain them clearly. Maybe at the debates

When we wish for modern incarnations of the right’s biggest idols, we feed into the myths surrounding them. I am more than a little disturbed by all these pieces coming out about why the left has no Ayn Rand as a guide or how Ronald Reagan was a “socialist” compared to Paul Ryan. One has

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Obama vs. Poverty (NYT) Paul Tough takes an in-depth look at how Barack Obama evolved from a candidate who spoke seriously about the need to fight urban poverty to a president who joined the consensus that the first rule of poverty is you don’t talk about

Check out this Prezi highlighting 16 of the most significant contributions government has made to the U.S. economy over the last 200 years: http://prezi.com/srpyvqqn8bff/rediscovering-government/ Rediscovering Government on Prezi

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Paul Ryan: Cruel, not courageous (WaPo) Katrina vanden Heuvel argues that while Paul Ryan has developed a reputation as a bold and principled policy wonk, his budget plan is the work of an ideologue who’s not speaking truth to power so much as whispering sweet nothings

On the 77th anniversary of Social Security, we’re celebrating what has made the program so important and why it continues to be vital today. Tim Price writes that through survivors benefits, Social Security creates a widely shared safety net. Read the rest of our coverage here. A growing number of pundits and policymakers talk about Social Security

On the 77th anniversary of Social Security, we’re celebrating what has made the program so important and why it remains vital today. Jeff Madrick explains why Social Security’s so-called fiscal crisis has been overblown and looks at the many simple solutions on the table. Read the rest of our coverage here. Little is as distressing

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. America’s clear choice: Franklin Roosevelt or Ayn Rand (FT) Simon Schama writes that Paul Ryan’s VP nod sets us up for the debate America has long needed: Do we stick with the New Deal that built the America we know and love, or do we scrap

To Paul Ryan, Faith is Fact

Paul Ryan is a true believer in right-wing economics, but his reputation as a courageous truth-teller doesn’t stand up to scrutiny. Mitt Romney’s choice of Rep. Paul Ryan as a vice presidential candidate has raised the decibel level of the anti-government movement dramatically. We started Rediscovering Government at the Roosevelt Institute to balance such ahistorical

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. The Ryan Choice (Robert Reich) Reich argues that as a running mate, Paul Ryan is the opposite of Sarah Palin: smooth shell, nutty right-wing filling. And while that might be a treat for the Republican base, Romney and Ryan might as well be running on the

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Joseph Stiglitz: ‘This Deficit Fetishism is Killing the Economy’ (AP) Roosevelt Institute Chief Economist Joseph Stiglitz argues that soaring inequality is America’s greatest challenge and that all the oxygen our policymakers are wasting on austerity debates is destroying brain cells they should be using to fix

This week’s numbers: $360 billion; $86 billion; 20%; $175,000; $130 $360 billion… is an unpaid number. That’s how much Romney’s tax plan would reduce revenue in 2015, according to a Tax Policy Center analysis. Maybe rather than running for president he’s just trying to engineer a leveraged buyout of the country. $86 billion… is a

Romney may be running as the small government candidate, but his only real goal is to cut taxes. The Tax Policy Center has carefully analyzed how much would come out of the pockets of the middle class and poor to support Mitt Romney’s top-heavy tax cuts for the rich. The numbers are appalling. But it’s likely Romney has

Americans have been taught to hope for the best, but to avoid a bleak future, we need to push for policies that support job creation. America’s national optimism is so pervasive that not much public thought has yet been given to the possibility that the Great Recession could endure for many years. Even if GDP,

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. The Romney campaign says stimulus doesn’t work. Here are the studies they left out. (WaPo) Mitt Romney’s economic advisers claim that Barack Obama’s stimulus policies have failed and hurt the economy, and after a thorough review of the literature, Dylan Matthews finds the evidence is on

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Romney’s incredible extremes (WaPo) Katrina vanden Heuvel argues that Romney has a key advantage despite his radical tax and spending plans: even if his critics’ attacks are totally accurate, his proposals are so ridiculous that voters have a hard time believing they’re not exaggerating. Romney’s Welfare

Individual action alone won’t solve our environmental problems, but neither will giving up on responsible consumer habits. “Story of Stuff” creator Annie Leonard has posted a new video, titled “The Story of Change,” in which she argues that it’s not responsible consumers but good citizens – those who vote, participate, take action, and generally show up –

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. The massive policy gap between Obama and Romney (WaPo) Ezra Klein writes that it’s tough to compare the candidates’ plans when Obama has detailed proposals about all sorts of things while Romney insists that he’ll fix everything, but like a birthday wish, he has to keep

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. The Most Important Election Since 1932? (Commonweal) Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Jeff Madrick writes that after Obama’s disappointments, Romney represents change you can believe in — though with the recession, the shredded safety net, and the likely onset of war, you may wish you were dreaming.

The real question isn’t whether Mitt Romney paid his taxes. It’s whether we want to make an unfair tax code even worse. Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney last week promised ABC News he would “go back and check” whether he had ever paid a tax rate lower than 2010’s 13.9 percent. He hasn’t, and the

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Debt, Depression, DeMarco (NYT) Paul Krugman writes that Edward DeMarco’s refusal to implement the Obama administration’s HAMP plan is another example of Republicans’ commitment to the reverse-Rooseveltian economic policy of “try nothing” and “bold, persistent exasperation.” Nine takeaways on Romney’s tax plan (WaPo) Ezra Klein argues that

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Who Would Gain in a Romney Tax Overhaul (NYT) Catherine Rampell highlights a new study that shows Mitt Romney’s tax plan would close loopholes but cut taxes for anyone making over $200,000 while asking more from the 95 percent of us who have never written off

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Mitt Romney’s 20th-century worldview (WaPo) Katrina vanden Heuvel argues that in addition to his retrograde domestic policies, Romney’s gaffetastic world tour shows that, like George W. Bush, he’s of the mindset that America can be judged not just by the quality but the quantity of its

The Aurora shooting has sparked debates over gun control, but health care reform is just as important for the uninsured victims. Just 11 days ago, a shooter opened fire in a movie theater in Aurora, Colorado, killing 12 and injuring 58 others who had gathered for the midnight premiere of The Dark Knight Rises. In

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Fussbudget: How Paul Ryan captured the G.O.P. (New Yorker) Ryan Lizza profiles the young Wisconsite on the House Budget Committee who became the de facto leader of the Republican Party by convincing them they had to lay out their own vision, no matter how scary it looks

Cutting back on meat is healthier for us and for the environment, but Republicans are more concerned about the health of corporate profits. Not content to keep Congress from doing anything about climate change, the GOP showed last week that it will also go out of its way to keep anyone else from taking action.

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. A Big Banker’s Belated Apology (NYT) Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Jeff Madrick notes that while Sandy Weill says big banks should be broken up now that he’s out of the game, he still insists deregulation was a good idea at the time. And it was, but

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Money for Nothing (NYT) Paul Krugman notes that our wise men keep predicting deficits will lead to disaster, but with borrowing costs at an all-time low, they’re like end-times prophets disappointed when the sun rises the day after they marked the apocalypse on their calendars. When

This week’s numbers: $1.8 million; $560,000; $1.5 billion; $1.1 billion; $1 billion $1.8 million… is a self-made number. That’s how much government aid has been given to Gilchrist Metal, a company highlighted in Romney ads as an independent success. The owner says he was just reclaiming his own tax money, which the government must have

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Romney’s Distortion — And Why It Matters (TNR) Jonathan Cohn writes that Mitt Romney continues to misrepresent President Obama’s remarks about business owners because it’s easier to attack a claim no one ever made than to defend an economic platform that no one takes seriously. Among

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. The GOP’s War Against Facts (Slate) Dahlia Lithwick and Raymond Vasvari write that from tax returns to campaign finance disclosures, the GOP is worried that an informed electorate could suffer an outbreak of independent thought, which is definitely not supported by the party platform. Romney’s “You Didn’t

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Austerity’s Big Winners Prove To Be Wall Street and the Wealthy (HuffPo) Zach Carter writes that austerity hasn’t only been a source of misery. As Roosevelt Institute Fellow Dorian Warren points out, the rich are liking it just fine, since they’ve reversed the process of redistribution

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Financial Scandal Scorecard (NYT) As the LIBOR scandal jostles for attention with Peregrine’s fraud, HSBC’s money laundering, and Capital One’s sketchy sales tactics, Joe Nocera plays a game of financial shenanigans bingo. Traditional regulators sleeping on the job is the free square. Prosecutors, regulators close to

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Who’s Very Important? (NYT) Paul Krugman argues that while the uber-rich may be V.I.P. at GOP fundraisers, they’re no more important to the economy than the working-class rabble. But that won’t stop elected Republicans from doting on them like a party full of nails ladies. Nikki

Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow and Rediscovering Government director Jeff Madrick appeared on Viewpoint with Eliot Spitzer this week along with Financial Times correspondent Tracy Alloway to discuss who should bear the blame for the growing LIBOR scandal. Responding to evidence that Fed officials knew the banks were up to no good, Jeff says in the clip

This week’s numbers: $453 million; $800 trillion; $31 million; 20; 150 $453 million… is a chastened number. That’s how much Barclays agreed to pay U.S. and British regulators for manipulating LIBOR. If the mortgage settlement was any indication, they’ll make up that money in no time by manipulating LIBOR. $800 trillion… is a mammoth number.

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. How Much Will Money Matter? (TAP) Jamelle Bouie writes that Mitt Romney’s fundraising advantage might not make much difference given the law of diminishing returns, the power of incumbency, and the fact that most Americans are already at least vaguely familiar with this Obama guy. Women Poised

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Time for ‘Banksters’ to be prosecuted (WaPo) Katrina vanden Heuvel writes that it’s good that bankers are sick of justifying their actions, because we’re all sick of hearing it. The problem is that our leaders continue to let them get away with murder (figuratively, if only

In the latest episode of the Roosevelt Institute’s weekly Bloggingheads series, “Fireside Chats,” Senior Fellow Mark Schmitt talks to Scott Lemieux of Lawyers, Guns, and Money and The American Prospect about the machinations behind the Supreme Court’s recent health care ruling and what challenges lie ahead for the Affordable Care Act. Mark notes that while

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Bank Scandal Turns Spotlight to Regulators (NYT) Ben Protess and Mark Scott write that some are asking whether regulators let LIBOR manipulation slide because it helped give banks the appearance of financial health. That’s almost as good as actually being healthy, but retains a fun element

Economists are increasingly using statistics to debunk the age-old belief that economic growth goes hand in hand with a large financial sector.  For a long time it was simply taken for granted that a large financial sector was beneficial to economic growth. This assumption supported the long period of financial deregulation and weak enforcement that

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. Latest Jobs Report Underscores Unemployment Crisis (HuffPo) Peter S. Goodman writes that Friday’s disappointing jobs numbers represent the struggles of millions of ordinary Americans, but the media only seems to care about what it means for exactly two job-seekers: Barack Obama and Mitt Romney. Disappointing Jobs Report:

America has been the world leader in scientific research for decades, but we risk falling behind if we don’t continue to fund groundbreaking projects. The United States is the most religious country in the Western world, but it took a team of European heathens to prove the existence of God. On Wednesday, researchers in Geneva

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail. GOP’s Rejection of Medicaid Funds is One More Ideologically Driven Bad Idea (The Nation) NND Editor Bryce Covert points