How to Win Our Votes in 2020

By the end of tonight—day two of the first round of the Democratic presidential primary debates—there will be various takes, including who has a better plan to fix health care, who prioritizes the climate crisis, and who’s the most likeable. Here at the Roosevelt Institute, we’re judging the candidates on one essential criterion: How are

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: May 2, 2018 CONTACT: Alexander Tucciarone, atucciarone@rooseveltinstitute.org, 516-263-9775   NEW REPORT CALLS FOR CREATION OF FEDERAL ENFORCEMENT AGENCY TO FIGHT CORRUPTION, REVAMP OF POST-WATERGATE ERA SYSTEM Proposed Agency is Centerpiece of Comprehensive Plan to Rebuild Trust in Government     NEW YORK, NY – Today, the Roosevelt Institute and the Great Democracy Initiative released

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Americans today rank corruption of government officials as their top fear—even above fear of North Korea’s use of nuclear weapons. Far from a new phenomenon, public trust in government has polled consistently low for over a decade. Newspapers report daily on elected officials who benefit personally from the policies they pass, regulators who once led

This is an edited version of his talk delivered at “Does America Have a Monopoly Problem,” co-hosted by the Roosevelt Institute and the George Washington Institute of Public Policy on September 25, 2017, in Washington, DC. The Nobel Prize winner argues that an economy dominated by large corporations has failed the many and enriched the

“Being unable to vote is like being on the fringe of society [as] a citizen that doesn’t have an active participation in it. You are just there, observing. You have no opportunity to affect change.” – Ken Shutle The ability to participate in our political system, and in particular the power to cast a vote,

When we talk about the immense inequality that exists in America today, we often think about the massive wealth accumulation at the top of the income ladder, which has persisted since the 1970s; or racial and gender inequality, which have both been constant features of American life throughout our history. However, what we sometimes overlook

In his opinion curtailing key aspects of the Voting Rights Act in Shelby County v. Holder (2013), Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts wrote that the act was no longer needed because “the country has changed” with regard to discrimination in voting. However, in the wake of the first presidential election since 1965 to be

Unless you live under a rock (and perhaps even if you do), by now you have heard a good deal about the Panama Papers, the 2.6-terabyte news leak orchestrated by nearly 400 journalists, currently being hailed as one of the largest document leaks in history. The documents detail the operations and clients of Mossack Fonseca, a

Leading up to today’s primary election, North Carolina has been the focus of national discourse on the right to vote and the fundamentals of democracy. North Carolina has one of the most restrictive voter ID laws in the nation, as well as some of the most blatant gerrymandered electoral maps. Given these facts, it’s no

Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest. Obama Shames Companies Who Don’t Want to Provide Health Insurance (Melissa Harris-Perry) As guest host on Melissa Harris-Perry, Roosevelt Institute Fellow Dorian Warren examines the president’s comments about a Staples policy that prevents workers from obtaining insurance. The State Where

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