Chart showing how Hispanic or Latinx people are disproportionately represented in

Last week, another 3 million Americans filed for unemployment benefits, bringing the total to 36.5 million since the pandemic began.  In the latest #ProgressingAhead Twitter chat, some of the brightest minds in economic policy shared their takeaways and possible solutions for what is already the deepest employment crisis since the Great Depression. Black, Latinx, and

Let’s start with the obvious: We are experiencing the worst labor market since the Great Depression, if not ever. Since the COVID-19 crisis began, the employment-to-population ratio has cratered to a record low 51.3 percent, with nearly 43 million Americans unemployed or underemployed in April. That figure is likely to worsen in May, as about

The United States is facing an unprecedented public health and economic crisis: over 82,000 dead, 20.5 million jobs lost in April, and a 15 percent unemployment rate. The scale and depth of the crisis are drawing parallels to World War II mobilization and the Great Depression. In fact, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and House

Person looking into unemployment office window

The Department of Labor (DOL) was slated to release the latest data on unemployment filings tomorrow (the announcement is delayed until May 8), figures that will provide a staggering picture of COVID-19’s devastating effects on workers and our economy. Though not unexpected, these findings must shape the strategy, size, and scope for America’s economic recovery. 

Our postal service, like so many institutions during the coronavirus crisis, is suffering. Facing $22 billion in expected new losses over the next 18 months, the USPS announced last week it will “run out of cash” in September without federal assistance. Despite this, President Trump refused a Democratic plan to add a $13 billion grant,

During the past month, our colleagues have been sharing their analyses of the effects of COVID-19 on the economy. They’ve underscored the continued gender imbalance of labor, the racial injustice central to our economy, and the disparate impact the virus has had on different groups of our country, and they’ve provided key analysis of the

President Trump ran for office promising to run the country more like a business. But over the last three-plus years, it’s become abundantly clear that his administration’s policies reflect some of the worst aspects of the short-termism that Wall Street demands of our nation’s CEOs. They have prized cutting so-called “regulatory red-tape” to help businesses’

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Something unprecedented has happened in recent weeks. The passage of the CARES Act—the largest stimulus package in American history—and broader debates about government spending, production, and health care have fundamentally shifted the political paradigm. As the coronavirus pandemic ravages an already fragile economy, consensus is building, even among the deficit scolds of 2008–2009, around the

With the CARES Act corporate bailout underway, large corporations are once again being rescued by a hurting American public. No one doubts that stabilizing the economy and saving jobs as a first priority is absolutely critical. What’s also necessary is to understand what factors—besides the coronavirus—made large corporations so vulnerable in this moment.  One factor

In the last three weeks, it has become clear that millennials are going to experience a second major recession in their working lives before they turn 40. Even before the COVID-19 crisis, it was widely documented that this generation—ages 24 to 39 and the most racially diverse adult cohort in history—was experiencing long-term harms from