Senator Kamala Harris (D-CA) and Congresswoman Pramila Jayapal (D-CA) introduced the Domestic Workers Bill of Rights today, backed by the National Domestic Workers Alliance. The bill would provide essential workplace rights and protections to a group of workers who have long been left out of basic standards for safety, security, pay, and well-being—in part because

How to Win Our Votes in 2020

By the end of tonight—day two of the first round of the Democratic presidential primary debates—there will be various takes, including who has a better plan to fix health care, who prioritizes the climate crisis, and who’s the most likeable. Here at the Roosevelt Institute, we’re judging the candidates on one essential criterion: How are

In “Exploring Guaranteed Income Through a Racial and Gender Justice Lens,” Jhumpa Bhattacharya of the Insight Center connects two of the ideas that have bubbled up to the surface of the 2020 political debate: The need to address the racial wealth gap that exists between people of color—particularly Black Americans—and white Americans, and a guaranteed

On Friday, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) released the unemployment figures for May. As expected, the reported unemployment rate was very low—3.6 percent, the same as last month. Combined with the steady growth in employment over the past few years, this level of unemployment—not seen since the 1960s—suggests an exceptionally strong labor market by historical

Tomorrow at Walmart’s shareholders’ meeting in Bentonville, Arkansas, Walmart workers will call out America’s broken corporate governance system and propose that Walmart workers be included on its board of directors. Walmart associate Cat Davis will be joined by Senator Bernie Sanders (I-VT), who will speak on behalf of workers’ right to participate in corporate decision-making.

As of late, I’ve been doing my utmost to find the silver linings of an otherwise frightening, frustrating, and disappointing news cycle—a rather difficult task in this political moment. There’s the legal fight brewing over Roe v. Wade, and Emily Peck’s sobering piece in HuffPost on the economic peril faced by women—and especially women of

Economic inequality is on the rise. Corporate “shareholder primacy” means that the vast majority of today’s record corporate profits are used to increase the wealth of shareholders, through dividends and stock buybacks.[1] Meanwhile, real wages for non-executive workers have essentially remained stagnant for decades. Increasing worker bargaining power in the 21st century is necessary, and

Despite individual policies polling better than conservative proposals—on health care, education, and taxes, for example—the public has yet to fully comprehend what progressives actually stand for. Progressive policymakers need a worldview that connects laundry lists of policy solutions to people’s daily lives, and a new issue brief by our colleagues offers just that. In “Increasing

America’s political landscape and economic thinking are shifting. The 2016 election—and the rise of powerful movements over the past decade—has shown us that Americans are calling for change. They want a diagnosis of our economy to help make sense of what’s gone wrong and to suggest ways to make things better. In New Rules for

Corporate profits are at record highs and unemployment is below 5 percent, yet 40 percent of Americans say that they would not be able to meet a $400 emergency. For too long we’ve been guided by the 50-year-old myth that fewer regulations and lower taxes on corporations and the wealthy will lead to economic growth