College affordability has been a major kitchen-table issue for American families for the past three decades. This is not surprising considering that college tuition rates have shot up since the 1980s: Tuition at public four-year colleges increased 213 percent from 1987 to 2017 and 129 percent at private not-for-profit colleges, helping drive the $1.6 trillion

Today is Black Friday, the start of the holiday shopping season. Retail workers will leave their Thanksgivings early—if they enjoy one at all—to start long shifts for too little pay in order to support the consumer binging that is America’s holiday season. The deals for shoppers may be sweet, and the profits for companies will

Madam Chair Wilson, Madam Chair Adams, Ranking Members Walberg and Byrne, and members of the Subcommittees, thank you for this opportunity to testify today. I am a professor at Temple University law school, a visiting professor at Georgetown University Law Center, and a fellow at the Roosevelt Institute. I am here today in my capacity

For decades, regulators have had only limited success in taming a for-profit college industry that routinely defrauds students, inflates prices, and produces devastatingly bad outcomes for student loan borrowers. But recently, instead of promoting complex regulatory schemes, some policymakers have offered a simple solution: take away for-profit colleges’ federal subsidies. Today, Rep. Pramila Jayapal (D-WA)

Amidst the major health care policy differences highlighted at Tuesday’s Democratic debate, we must not forget one telling statistic: While the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has extended insurance coverage to millions, a majority of Americans who were uninsured prior to passage of the law still remain uninsured today.  Relative to the most credible forecasts from

Thank you, Chairwoman Maloney and Ranking Member Huizenga, for inviting me to speak today. It is an honor to be here. My name is Lenore Palladino, and I am Assistant Professor of Economics & Public Policy at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, a Fellow at the Roosevelt Institute, and Research Associate at the Political Economy

This week, Roosevelt Communications Manager Ariela Weinberger is reading an Axios article on how automation will negatively impact the racial wealth gap—especially for Black workers—and a New York Times op-ed from economists Emmanuel Saez and Gabriel Zucman on the future of tax justice and how absurd it is that “the working class is now paying

Late last month, the Business Roundtable (BRT)—a collection of 181 of the country’s largest corporations—announced that it was breaking from over 20 years of precedent. Instead of prioritizing shareholder value over everything else, the BRT declared that it would elevate the interests of all other stakeholders—including customers, communities, and suppliers—alongside it. Most notably, the very

Imagine a world in which the most pressing issue is to slash taxes for the rich and only the rich, costing the US government hundreds of billions of dollars and doing little to spur economic growth. Imagine a policy so unequal that even Mitt Romney has his doubts. Reader, I give you the capital gains

On Thursday, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) released new estimates of the US “tax gap,” which measures the difference between the taxes people, corporations, and other entities legally owe and what is actually collected. The tax gap totals nearly $8 trillion over the past decade, according to the chief mathematician (#MathIsReal) for the Senate Budget