The ability of workers to bargain for a greater share of a firm’s corporate profits has eroded over decades, and one of the growing drivers of this reality is the financialization of the corporate sector. Corporate financialization can be summed up as two behaviors: firms (like Walmart or Pfizer) increasingly earning profits from financial activity

Why This Matters is a new series from Roosevelt staff connecting our individual work—from papers to reports and everything in between—to our broader vision of creating a better, more equitable economic and political system. This series will give readers the top takeaways from our latest writing and thinking, with a focus on why they matter

The enormous tax legislation currently moving through the Senate at breakneck speed has already been analyzed by several official and nonpartisan experts and every single analysis has shown the same thing: the biggest tax cuts go to the wealthy and corporations, and many middle-income and lower-income families would pay more in taxes than they do

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Welcome to the inaugural edition of Why This Matters, a new series from Roosevelt staff connecting our individual work—from papers to reports and everything in between—to our broader vision of creating a new, more equitable economic and political system. This series will give readers the top takeaways from our latest writing and thinking, with a focus on why

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Progressives should embrace employee ownership as one of the best ways to challenge corporate power from the bottom up and put supporting the growth of worker-owned firms in the center of our strategy. As the economy becomes Uber-ized and dominant firms in all sectors take up more and more market share, structural reforms like better

How would a massive federal spending program like a universal basic income (UBI) affect the macroeconomy? We use the Levy Institute macroeconometric model to estimate the impact of three versions of such an unconditional cash assistance program over an eight-year time horizon. Overall, we find that the economy can not only withstand large increases in

In Trump’s first address, he promised that American infrastructure would become “second to none.” He committed to investing in urban centers, rebuilding highways and bridges, and improving schools. Yet, the administration’s infrastructure initiative released in May doesn’t make good on this promise. Though this initiative is currently scant in details, the administration champions infrastructure investment

The FCC Tilts Its Hand

On July 13th, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) reversed an Administrative Law Judge’s ruling that Cablevision discriminated against the Game Show Network (GSN) by moving it from its basic tier of channels to an add-on sports tier. This advantaged a rival channel owned by Cablevision itself, which would now face less competition for customer eyeballs

The Congressional Democrats’ new economic agenda elevates antitrust policy to a stature it has not attained in many decades, and it questions the consensus that has governed antitrust policy while it has been out of the public eye. Antitrust must be a core component of any agenda that would address the slow economic growth, rising

This blog is cross-posted from the Cambridge University Press blog. Roosevelt Fellow Andrea Flynn, one of the authors of the forthcoming Hidden Rules of Race, gives us a look at the much-anticipated new book exploring inequality in the United States. Racial inequality is alive and well in America, and conservatives are strategically dismantling one of