The problem of labor market monopsony—buyer power among employers—has gotten increasing attention in recent years, including in my 2016 Roosevelt Institute paper with Roosevelt fellow Mike Konczal, in a Council of Economic Advisors issue brief, and in a widely-circulated paper by economist Simcha Barkai. The basic idea of monopsony is that if employers don’t have

Why This Matters is a new series from Roosevelt staff connecting our individual work—from papers to reports and everything in between—to our broader vision of creating a better, more equitable economic and political system. This series will give readers the top takeaways from our latest writing and thinking, with a focus on why they matter

This week, the Senate Judiciary Committee is holding a hearing about the consumer welfare standard to determine whether it is outdated or remains the worthwhile core principle of antitrust enforcement. The hearing comes amid widespread questioning about antitrust’s effectiveness in recent decades. As the debate over the AT&T-Time Warner merger rages, this hearing is particularly timely.

The recent deal reached between Senate Banking Committee Chairman Mike Crapo (R-ID) and nine Senate Democrats, which the Senate Banking Committee approved earlier this week, is bad policy—and even worse politics. Americans understand they are being taken advantage of by the banks they depend on, and they fear that Wall Street lobbyists are rigging the

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Roosevelt Institute Program Manager Eric Harris Bernstein was featured on the November 20th episode of Reality Check on WURD Radio, hosted by Charles Ellison. Listen to the segment on the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, where they discuss details about the bill, its impact on higher education, and how it would hurt middle and working

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The agreement reached between Senate Banking Committee Chairman Mike Crapo and ten Senate Democrats is billed as a necessary technical fix to Dodd-Frank and regulatory relief for community banks. But this proposal would cause more harm than many—including some allies—currently believe. It would expose risk to mid-sized banks, threaten the stability of the financial industry,

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The Feds Side Against Alt-Labor

Last week, the Federal Trade Commission voted 2-0 to join the Justice Department’s Antitrust Division in an amicus brief to the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, siding with the Chamber of Commerce against the City of Seattle’s grant of collective bargaining rights to “independent contractors” working as drivers for Uber, Lyft, taxis, and other ride-sharing

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This is an edited version of his talk delivered at “Does America Have a Monopoly Problem,” co-hosted by the Roosevelt Institute and the George Washington Institute of Public Policy on September 25, 2017, in Washington, DC. The Nobel Prize winner argues that an economy dominated by large corporations has failed the many and enriched the

Yesterday, two nominees went before the Senate Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs Committee for a chance to become the next commissioners of the Securities and Exchange Commission. We were thrilled to see Senator Brian Schatz ask the nominees to give their thoughts about the stock buyback “safe harbor,” Rule 10b-18, and even more excited that both

Presentation to the Congressional Progressive Caucus, Opening Remarks October 5, 2017 Amazon recently bought Whole Foods, following a pro-forma approval by the Federal Trade Commission. Amazon touted its plans to cut prices on popular items on the very day the merger closed, and it advertised those discounts as resulting from the merger. It was as