“Market Power Rising” Panel on Antitrust in the Labor Market, Opening Remarks September 25, 2017 Antitrust policy has typically viewed monopsony power in the labor market as arising from an essentially competitive context—if it exists at all. The maintained assumption in the antitrust orthodoxy has been that the economy is on or near its production

Welcome to the inaugural edition of Why This Matters, a new series from Roosevelt staff connecting our individual work—from papers to reports and everything in between—to our broader vision of creating a new, more equitable economic and political system. This series will give readers the top takeaways from our latest writing and thinking, with a focus on why

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With all the discussion on Trump’s tax plan, you could be forgiven for thinking the current tax code is a good tax system. Today’s tax system creates a disproportionate concentration of wealth in the corporate and financial sectors, while leaving revenue on the table that could be put to productive use. In a recent paper,

Today, President Trump unveiled new details about the tax reform plan that have been hashed out in secret for months by the so-called Gang of Six. As reporters and policy experts run numbers about who wins and who loses (spoiler alert: Mnuchin, Trump, and Cohn win, America loses), let’s take a step back at the

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Despite energetic conversations around stagnant wages and job creation, few consider that the financialization of America’s public corporations has contributed just as much to economic inequality as more commonly-cited factors. The debate seems well-settled: scholars point to globalization[1], skill-biased technical change[2], and the decline of union density[3]. Others point to the “rise of the robots”[4],

Winning the Fight Over Tax Reform

This week, President Trump and his allies in the Senate are ramping up their campaign to reform our nation’s tax code. In Finance Committee hearings and over bipartisan dinners, the talking points are familiar: A White House press release described their tax plan as a way to “unleash America’s economic potential,” and just yesterday, the

Washington State workers got a Labor Day reprieve when the World Trade Organization sided with the U.S. over the state’s aircraft subsidies. But — after years of the U.S. trying to throw its weight around in the Geneva court — the result may be more mixed than it appears at first glance. What They Found Today’s decision reverses a

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Our colleagues at the Roosevelt Institute, together with the Levy Institute, just published an exciting new paper entitled, “Modeling the Macroeconomic Effects of a Universal Basic Income.” The paper takes a major step forward in answering an important question: How would a massive federal spending program like a “universal basic income” (UBI) affect economic growth

A Real Monopoly Moment

The news that Barry Lynn’s Open Markets group has been evicted from its DC think tank home, New America, for crossing the interests of its major funder, Google, is a legitimately shocking development. This development crystalizes the concerns about monopoly power that we at Roosevelt have been pointing out these past few years—along with our

The other day, Scott Greenberg of the Tax Foundation claimed that “Tax Rates on the Rich Were Not That Much Higher in the 1950s.” His idea? That despite a statutory top marginal income tax rate of 91% in that era, the rich actually paid a much lower effective tax rate, because they were able to

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