Citing cost concerns, House Democrats amended their latest coronavirus response package yesterday to exclude a proposal that would have cancelled up to $10,000 in student debt for more than 45 million Americans. The new proposal offers cancellation only to a narrow group of “economically distressed” borrowers. This change is worrisome, not only because it leaves

During the past month, our colleagues have been sharing their analyses of the effects of COVID-19 on the economy. They’ve underscored the continued gender imbalance of labor, the racial injustice central to our economy, and the disparate impact the virus has had on different groups of our country, and they’ve provided key analysis of the

The Great Democracy Initiative’s (GDI) latest report on how Dodd-Frank regulatory powers could be used to curb carbon financing offers an innovative approach to addressing the climate crisis. For the Roosevelt Network, it also reminds us that this wouldn’t be possible without the groundwork of youth-led divestiture movements that have increasingly gained momentum in recent

In the wake of President Trump’s election in 2016, my friends and I at the George Washington University (GW) were anxious about health insurance. We worried that Trump and a Republican legislature might overturn the entire Affordable Care Act. A loss of protections allowing young people to stay on their parents’ health insurance until age

America’s $1.6 trillion student debt crisis is crushing millions of us, but it is disproportionately harming Black people—and fueling the racial wealth gap.  In a new Roosevelt report, co-released with Demos and The Century Foundation, Roosevelt Program Manager Suzanne Kahn and her coauthors underscore that our debt-financed higher education system reinforces the structural racism that plagues

Student debt cancellation is generating the most online attention out of all of the Democratic presidential candidates’ policy proposals, according to a new analysis. Given that issues like health care or immigration are usually what voters care most about, this is a notable shift. It’s not just the subject of student debt that has captured

The climate crisis is happening now. Across the planet, our oceans are warming, our weather is more extreme, and natural disasters are more frequent and more severe. And it’s only going to get worse: The UN predicts that by 2040, increased coastal flooding will affect nearly 50 million people, and a “disproportionately rapid evacuation” of

Earlier this month, in a powerful act of solidarity, 36 Jewish activists were arrested for obstructing access to an ICE detention facility. It’s a salient reminder that step one of being an ally is knowing your history. I think often of how inextricably linked Asian Amerian history is with that of other people of color

America’s political landscape and economic thinking are shifting. The 2016 election—and the rise of powerful movements over the past decade—has shown us that Americans are calling for change. They want a diagnosis of our economy to help make sense of what’s gone wrong and to suggest ways to make things better. In New Rules for

In America, we are told that government is “of the people, by the people, for the people.”  But this has never been true for all people. Since our nation’s founding, communities across the country have been shut out of political institutions that are supposed to work for the public good. Without the voices of these