In response to the growing coronavirus crisis, states are stopping “nonessential” surgeries to ease the burden on hospitals and medical workers. While this is admirable in theory, conservatives at both the state and federal levels have capitalized on these legitimate efforts to protect our collective well-being by misclassifying critical care as “nonessential” and restricting the

The coronavirus crisis is, first and foremost, a health crisis. The Trump administration’s failure to take the threat of COVID-19 seriously—and our systematic, decades-long decimation of our nation’s public health infrastructure—has turned what may have been a public health challenge into a crisis for our health care system. And one area where the failures of

The current economic crisis is fast-moving, and many of the challenges we are facing—and anticipating—are unprecedented. Though the immediate effects of the coronavirus may spark a potential recession, our economy’s underlying structural problems mean that the fallout will likely be much worse and last longer for millions of people unless we act quickly and aggressively. 

COVID-19 represents both a public health emergency and an economic crisis. While federal, state, and local governments must take strong steps to stem the spread of the virus — from continuing to close schools, restaurants, and workplaces and limit the size of gatherings, to ensuring that everyone has access to health care and can be

How Much Stimulus Do We Need?

If the experience of the last recession is a guide, avoiding a severe downturn will take far more stimulus spending than is currently being discussed—as much as $3 trillion. The coronavirus is, first and foremost, a public health crisis. The most immediate questions it poses are how to keep it from spreading, and how to

The coronavirus outbreak has led to a collapsing economy. The economic situation is deteriorating so fast that people are struggling in real time to understand fundamental questions and policy objectives.  “A Forward-Thinking Policy Response to the Coronavirus Recession” is an overview of where things stand. We focus on the nature of the economic crisis, and

March is Women’s History Month, and this year’s celebration starts with June Medical Services v. Gee, a current Supreme Court case that poses the latest threat both to Roe v. Wade specifically and to women’s health and economic security at large. This case is the most recent reminder of how precarious reproductive health and rights

In the wake of President Trump’s election in 2016, my friends and I at the George Washington University (GW) were anxious about health insurance. We worried that Trump and a Republican legislature might overturn the entire Affordable Care Act. A loss of protections allowing young people to stay on their parents’ health insurance until age

Health care—and the prospect of a single-payer system—has gotten a lot of attention at the national level and in presidential debates this year. And for good reason: The costs of health care are consistently rising faster than the economy overall, and households are bearing those increased costs through growing premiums and deductibles. That means many

Did Marketplace Coverage Really Offer Financial Protection? Financial Gains from the Affordable Care Act’s Private Insurance Policies for the Previously Uninsured While the Affordable Care Act (ACA) expanded health coverage to millions of Americans, more than half of the people eligible for the law’s private insurance marketplace remained uninsured. Today, most of those who were