As a first-generation immigrant and young person of color, I constantly ask myself this question: “What does it mean to be an American?”  Watching Black lives lost at the hands of unchecked police brutality, countless deaths from COVID-19 due to unmitigated failures in leadership, and the collapse of our severely fractured welfare state, I feel

For the first time in US history, the House of Representatives will vote to grant Washington, DC, full congressional representation. While press coverage has focused on the gains for Washingtonians, there are material benefits this move will bring for the rest of the country as well—especially as we address the deep wounds of institutionalized racism.

We’ve long known this: A health care system hinged on employer-sponsored insurance is unequal, inefficient, and ill-equipped for an employment crisis. Amid a global pandemic and unprecedented job loss, no one can argue this: The US’s patchwork health insurance system has needlessly imperiled the lives and economic security of many, especially our nation’s most vulnerable. 

Young people and students have been on the frontlines of movements for social change throughout our country’s history. And over the last few days, young people have joined protestors, across age, race, and class, and flooded the streets to demand justice—for George Floyd, for Breonna Taylor, for the disproportionate number of Black lives lost to

“It looks as if the system cannot reform itself,” said Dr. Cornel West this past Friday in discussing the public murder of George Floyd on May 25. In 5 minutes and 23 seconds, Dr. West delivers the powerful—and painful—truth: We are living in a moment of compounded systemic failures, at least those of us who

Amidst the major health care policy differences highlighted at Tuesday’s Democratic debate, we must not forget one telling statistic: While the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has extended insurance coverage to millions, a majority of Americans who were uninsured prior to passage of the law still remain uninsured today.  Relative to the most credible forecasts from

At least a quarter of the 2.3 million incarcerated people in US are addicted to opioids. The fact that our criminal justice system does not routinely provide treatment for opioid withdrawal or treat addiction as a disease is at best wasteful and counterproductive. Harsh drug laws ensure that we continue to see addiction as a

Earlier this month, in a powerful act of solidarity, 36 Jewish activists were arrested for obstructing access to an ICE detention facility. It’s a salient reminder that step one of being an ally is knowing your history. I think often of how inextricably linked Asian Amerian history is with that of other people of color

Growing up as a Bengali American woman in Arizona, I have repeatedly been left with an unshakable feeling of being an outsider looking in. Belonging to the only Muslim family in my small community, I struggled to relate to my peers. I can recall being forced to navigate a variety of stereotypes and constantly fielding

Marking the country’s independence, the Fourth of July is celebrated annually with fireworks, backyard barbecues, baseball games, and all things Americana. To many, Independence Day represents the ideals of this country–freedom, equity, and independence from tyranny. But not everyone was or is included in those ideals; in the period between 1776 and 1790, slaves comprised