In response to “The Starving State: Why Capitalism’s Salvation Depends on Taxation” by Joseph E. Stiglitz, Gabriel Zucman, and Todd Tucker for Foreign Affairs, the Roosevelt Institute is hosting a blog symposium to further examine the history of international tax rules and the path ahead toward more inclusive and fair international tax policies. Opening the

The negotiations on corporate taxation at the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development’s (OECD) BEPS Inclusive Framework initiative have rightly generated much discussion, both on the process and on the proposed changes in tax policies. Allison Christians has pointed to several concerns that developing countries have with both: the proposal is one that has maximum

The global fight over how—and where—to tax the new digital economy is raging on. Just last week, the Office of the US Trade Representative (USTR) published the conclusions from its investigation into France’s new tax on large tech companies, such as Apple, Facebook, and Google. The USTR found that the French tax discriminates against US

I’m pleased to be able to kick off Roosevelt’s blog symposium on international tax rules, joined by Rasmus Corlin Christensen of Copenhagen Business School, Valpy Fitzgerald from Oxford, Jayati Ghosh from Jawaharlal Nehru University, and Martin Hearson from Sussex. Additional thanks to Tommaso Faccio of ICRICT for helping coordinate. We are anchoring our blog symposium

Tweetstorm on Trade

It has been a big day for NAFTA 2.0, and not in good way.  Here’s more—adapted from a twitter thread—on developments of the last 24 hours – including Pence’s Canadian visit, Lighthizer’s submission of NAFTA text to Congress, and Trump’s impetuous launching of a trade offensive against Mexico… Pence’s Canada trip seemed like a desperate

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: April 18, 2019 CONTACT: Ariela Weinberger, aweinberger@rooseveltinstitute.org Roosevelt Fellow and Trade Expert Responds to Latest on New NAFTA Today, the US International Trade Commission issued the government’s official projection for the impact of the Trump administration’s remake of the 1993 North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). The report estimates that NAFTA 2.0

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Over the weekend, the Trump administration announced plans to terminate the 1993 North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) to force a skeptical Congress to accept his repackaged 2.0 version. This risky gambit is based on a faulty premise: The executive branch lacks constitutional authority to roll back NAFTA’s implementing legislation. While the president can formally

Is globalization good or bad for workers? One view sees it as an inevitable and desirable process of making economies more efficient: It may displace workers in the short run, but it has the potential to make them richer in the long run. Another view sees globalization as a net negative, leading to a loss

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Why This Matters is a series from Roosevelt staff connecting our individual work—from papers to reports and everything in between—to our broader vision of creating a better, more equitable economic and political system. This series will give readers the top takeaways from our latest writing and thinking, with a focus on why they matter as we

Last week, the Trump administration launched an unprecedented action to enforce the environmental rules in a trade agreement between the United States and Peru. According to the press release: “United States Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer today directed the United States Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to block future timber imports from a Peruvian exporter based on