The Blog of the Roosevelt Institute

The Year of the Woman, Again

For Women’s Review of Books, Roosevelt Senior Fellow Ellen Chesler reviews International Women’s Year: The Greatest Consciousness-Raising Event in History. Authored by Duke University historian Jocelyn Olcott, International Women’s Year “adds substantially to the historiography of women on a global stage,” writes Chesler. By examining the first international conference of women, Olcott rectifies the event’s historically biased portrayal and champions it

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Is globalization good or bad for workers? One view sees it as an inevitable and desirable process of making economies more efficient: It may displace workers in the short run, but it has the potential to make them richer in the long run. Another view sees globalization as a net negative, leading to a loss

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It has been ten years since the financial crisis dealt the biggest blow to the world economy since the Great Depression. While growth has returned, and the jobmarket  has by now tightened—especially in the United States, where the crisis originated—the reverberations of the crisis continue to affect us in ways both large and small, both obvious

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Since the 1970s, America’s antitrust policy regime has been weakening and market power has been on the rise. High market concentration—in which few firms compete in a given market—is one indicator of market power. From 1985 to 2017, the number of mergers completed annually rose from 2,308 to 15,361 (IMAA 2017). Recently, policymakers, academics, and

Financialization Incubator

Higher education is in a state of crisis. Public funding for schools is decreasing. Tuition and fees are rising. Students continue to shoulder the burden of these trends, collectively taking on nearly $1.6 trillion in debt. Yet institutional leaders are pouring billions of dollars into risky financial investments and expensive amenities—actively prioritizing monetary gains over

Editor’s Note: On August 15, 2018, Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) introduced the Accountable Capitalism Act, legislation that would require corporations to consider the interests of all stakeholders within the firm—not only shareholders—in company decisions. Corporations are made up of a wide range of stakeholders: workers, managers, executives, and shareholders. Currently, only executives and shareholders have the

Banks today are increasingly consolidating branch locations, while also moving away from low-cost financial services to high-profit activities, leaving marginalized Americans underserved and left behind in today’s economy. Without access to basic banking services, such as checking and savings accounts or small loans, consumers are vulnerable
to a host of financial abuses. To foster a more

Workers are increasingly powerless in the 21st century economy. Working people have few rights on the job, corporations and wealthy individuals hold outsized influence in politics and policymaking, economic inequality is vast and deep, and economic mobility is out of reach for most. Most notably, the unionization rate—a key measure of worker voice and worker

Why This Matters is a series from Roosevelt staff connecting our individual work—from papers to reports and everything in between—to our broader vision of creating a better, more equitable economic and political system. This series will give readers the top takeaways from our latest writing and thinking, with a focus on why they matter as we

Introduction On Tuesday, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC)—one of the nation’s banking regulators—announced that it will allow non-bank financial technology companies (fintechs) to apply for national bank status. This may sound like a plain-vanilla regulatory move, but it is a move in the wrong direction from regulation that would truly protect

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