The Blog of the Roosevelt Institute

The United States is facing an unprecedented public health and economic crisis: over 82,000 dead, 20.5 million jobs lost in April, and a 15 percent unemployment rate. The scale and depth of the crisis are drawing parallels to World War II mobilization and the Great Depression. In fact, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and House

The Roosevelts contributed so much to the way of life in America. Their story is worth knowing and celebrating. Understanding how personal their impact has been is seen here through the eyes of the Library’s dedicated supporters as they recount their favorite Roosevelt things. 6/26/20 Favorite memory or experience involving the Roosevelts or the Library:

Among the more novel ideas for responding to the COVID-19 crisis is the reboot of a long-forgotten New Deal-era institution: the Reconstruction Finance Corporation (RFC). Operating from 1932 to 1957, the agency lent and invested tens of billions of dollars to banks, manufacturers, state and local governments, federal agencies, and more—even creating whole industries from

Person looking into unemployment office window

The Department of Labor (DOL) was slated to release the latest data on unemployment filings tomorrow (the announcement is delayed until May 8), figures that will provide a staggering picture of COVID-19’s devastating effects on workers and our economy. Though not unexpected, these findings must shape the strategy, size, and scope for America’s economic recovery. 

Roosevelt Institute Board Member and Vice Chair Paul R. Rudd died suddenly on Tuesday, April 28, in New York. Paul joined our board in 2011 and served as chair of the Finance and Investment committee. We will deeply miss his wisdom, knowledge, and kindness, and his commitment to making the world more just and equitable.

My experience with the Roosevelt Institute is linked to the person I admire most in politics: Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA). When I entered my first year of college at UCLA, I aspired to attend law school one day; public policy was not on my professional radar, and I was pessimistic about politics in general. At

Our postal service, like so many institutions during the coronavirus crisis, is suffering. Facing $22 billion in expected new losses over the next 18 months, the USPS announced last week it will “run out of cash” in September without federal assistance. Despite this, President Trump refused a Democratic plan to add a $13 billion grant,

In striking ways, the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has exposed the fragility of the US economy and the immense power disparities and systemic disadvantages built into our social contract. Tens of millions of people across entire sectors of our economy are out of work—and many were living paycheck to paycheck before this crisis hit. Right now, the Roosevelt Institute’s work

During the past month, our colleagues have been sharing their analyses of the effects of COVID-19 on the economy. They’ve underscored the continued gender imbalance of labor, the racial injustice central to our economy, and the disparate impact the virus has had on different groups of our country, and they’ve provided key analysis of the

President Trump ran for office promising to run the country more like a business. But over the last three-plus years, it’s become abundantly clear that his administration’s policies reflect some of the worst aspects of the short-termism that Wall Street demands of our nation’s CEOs. They have prized cutting so-called “regulatory red-tape” to help businesses’

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