The Blog of the Roosevelt Institute

Each Saturday, a Roosevelt staff member will share 3-5 articles that they consider must-reads. This week, Roosevelt Communications Director Kendra Bozarth is sharing an antitrust reading list and elevates the hidden rules of drug addiction. I recently finished Good and Mad by Rebecca Traister, which is fitting because I am definitely a woman signaling fury

Each Saturday, a Roosevelt staff member will share 3-5 articles that they consider must-reads. This week, Roosevelt Fellow Katy Milani is reading Emily Stewart’s piece in Vox on the influence that Occupy Wall Street played in shaping progressives’ economic policy ideas, including free college, the $15 minimum wage, and efforts to combat climate change: “[T]oday,

Despite individual policies polling better than conservative proposals—on health care, education, and taxes, for example—the public has yet to fully comprehend what progressives actually stand for. Progressive policymakers need a worldview that connects laundry lists of policy solutions to people’s daily lives, and a new issue brief by our colleagues offers just that. In “Increasing

Each Saturday, a Roosevelt staff member will share 3-5 articles that they consider must-reads. This week, Roosevelt Fellow Rakeen Mabud is reading a WaPo story on how women are transforming organized labor and a New York Times op-ed that shows how “racism eats wealth for breakfast.” Rakeen also shares the latest from The Nation’s Bryce

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Carnegie Mellon University’s Heinz College of Information Systems and Public Policy awards affiliates of the Roosevelt Institute who enroll in any of the master’s programs at Heinz College a minimum scholarship of 30% of tuition per semester.  Heinz College provides students with the analytics, technology, and policy skills necessary to solve complex societal problems in

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: April 18, 2019 CONTACT: Ariela Weinberger, aweinberger@rooseveltinstitute.org Roosevelt Fellow and Trade Expert Responds to Latest on New NAFTA Today, the US International Trade Commission issued the government’s official projection for the impact of the Trump administration’s remake of the 1993 North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). The report estimates that NAFTA 2.0

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America’s political landscape and economic thinking are shifting. The 2016 election—and the rise of powerful movements over the past decade—has shown us that Americans are calling for change. They want a diagnosis of our economy to help make sense of what’s gone wrong and to suggest ways to make things better. In New Rules for

This blog post is based off of remarks given at “Wall Street and the Next Recession: Protecting Main Street in the Next Economic Downturn,” an event co-sponsored by Americans for Financial Reform and the Center for Popular Democracy at the US Senate. One thing is certain about markets: they go up and they go down.

Workers are increasingly powerless in today’s economy. The decades-long assault on the voice and agency of American workers continues to erode their position under employers: Declining unionization rates, the proliferation of noncompete and arbitration clauses, and outsized employer power plague labor markets today. Additionally, an increasingly fissured workplace is yet one more challenge our most

President Franklin D. Roosevelt once said that “government is ourselves.” Throughout American democracy, however, far too many communities have been denied political power and have seen government power deployed against them. This reality has been made clear at the federal, state, and local levels through intensified anti-immigrant policies, attacks on reproductive care for women, a

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