Amidst the major health care policy differences highlighted at Tuesday’s Democratic debate, we must not forget one telling statistic: While the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has extended insurance coverage to millions, a majority of Americans who were uninsured prior to passage of the law still remain uninsured today.  Relative to the most credible forecasts from

Imagine a world in which the most pressing issue is to slash taxes for the rich and only the rich, costing the US government hundreds of billions of dollars and doing little to spur economic growth. Imagine a policy so unequal that even Mitt Romney has his doubts. Reader, I give you the capital gains

Progressing Ahead in 2019

Summers are never slow at Roosevelt, and now we’re gearing up for an even busier fall. At the top of our to-do list is explaining how and why the public sector must make big investments to tackle our nation’s toughest challenges; promoting our ideas to influence the Democratic presidential debate; and welcoming two new fellows

Lenore Palladino, Roosevelt Senior Economist and Policy Counsel Question: What would you do about the runaway influence of shareholder power in the economy? Why It Matters: Most Americans are increasingly powerless in today’s economy and our democracy, especially workers. A decades-long shift in corporate governance has created an environment in which the interests of shareholders

Also posted at the Institute for Agriculture & Trade Policy website. The Democratic primary debate on Thursday night was probably the first time that soil management—as climate policy—was ever mentioned at a primetime presidential campaign event. It was also one of the first tangible mentions of farm policy in two nights of debates. “Carbon farming”—building

How to Win Our Votes in 2020

By the end of tonight—day two of the first round of the Democratic presidential primary debates—there will be various takes, including who has a better plan to fix health care, who prioritizes the climate crisis, and who’s the most likeable. Here at the Roosevelt Institute, we’re judging the candidates on one essential criterion: How are

Tweetstorm on Trade

It has been a big day for NAFTA 2.0, and not in good way.  Here’s more—adapted from a twitter thread—on developments of the last 24 hours – including Pence’s Canadian visit, Lighthizer’s submission of NAFTA text to Congress, and Trump’s impetuous launching of a trade offensive against Mexico… Pence’s Canada trip seemed like a desperate

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As of late, I’ve been doing my utmost to find the silver linings of an otherwise frightening, frustrating, and disappointing news cycle—a rather difficult task in this political moment. There’s the legal fight brewing over Roe v. Wade, and Emily Peck’s sobering piece in HuffPost on the economic peril faced by women—and especially women of

Some of the most pressing challenges of our time—inequality and climate change—require bold proposals to set the United States and the world on a new trajectory. In Fixing the Senate: Equitable and Full Representation for the 21st Century, Roosevelt Fellow Todd N. Tucker explores five ways to realign the body with the functions it was

Vox published an excellent discussion with economist Brad Delong where he makes the argument on why left-leaning neoliberals (who “use market means to social democratic ends when they are more effective, and they often are”) should be comfortable with the “baton rightly pass[ing] to our colleagues on our left. We are still here, but it