As a first-generation immigrant and young person of color, I constantly ask myself this question: “What does it mean to be an American?”  Watching Black lives lost at the hands of unchecked police brutality, countless deaths from COVID-19 due to unmitigated failures in leadership, and the collapse of our severely fractured welfare state, I feel

For the first time in US history, the House of Representatives will vote to grant Washington, DC, full congressional representation. While press coverage has focused on the gains for Washingtonians, there are material benefits this move will bring for the rest of the country as well—especially as we address the deep wounds of institutionalized racism.

We’ve long known this: A health care system hinged on employer-sponsored insurance is unequal, inefficient, and ill-equipped for an employment crisis. Amid a global pandemic and unprecedented job loss, no one can argue this: The US’s patchwork health insurance system has needlessly imperiled the lives and economic security of many, especially our nation’s most vulnerable. 

The United States is facing an unprecedented public health and economic crisis: over 82,000 dead, 20.5 million jobs lost in April, and a 15 percent unemployment rate. The scale and depth of the crisis are drawing parallels to World War II mobilization and the Great Depression. In fact, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and House

During the past month, our colleagues have been sharing their analyses of the effects of COVID-19 on the economy. They’ve underscored the continued gender imbalance of labor, the racial injustice central to our economy, and the disparate impact the virus has had on different groups of our country, and they’ve provided key analysis of the

President Trump ran for office promising to run the country more like a business. But over the last three-plus years, it’s become abundantly clear that his administration’s policies reflect some of the worst aspects of the short-termism that Wall Street demands of our nation’s CEOs. They have prized cutting so-called “regulatory red-tape” to help businesses’

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Something unprecedented has happened in recent weeks. The passage of the CARES Act—the largest stimulus package in American history—and broader debates about government spending, production, and health care have fundamentally shifted the political paradigm. As the coronavirus pandemic ravages an already fragile economy, consensus is building, even among the deficit scolds of 2008–2009, around the

With the CARES Act corporate bailout underway, large corporations are once again being rescued by a hurting American public. No one doubts that stabilizing the economy and saving jobs as a first priority is absolutely critical. What’s also necessary is to understand what factors—besides the coronavirus—made large corporations so vulnerable in this moment.  One factor

In the last three weeks, it has become clear that millennials are going to experience a second major recession in their working lives before they turn 40. Even before the COVID-19 crisis, it was widely documented that this generation—ages 24 to 39 and the most racially diverse adult cohort in history—was experiencing long-term harms from

The coronavirus outbreak has led to a collapsing economy. The economic situation is deteriorating so fast that people are struggling in real time to understand fundamental questions and policy objectives.  “A Forward-Thinking Policy Response to the Coronavirus Recession” is an overview of where things stand. We focus on the nature of the economic crisis, and