In the past two decades, equal opportunities for people with disabilities (PWDs) have been outlined and guaranteed through two federal acts: the 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act and the 2014 Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act. Intended to increase access to high-quality workforce services and preparation for competitive integrated employment, these federal acts set precedent for

As a first-generation immigrant and young person of color, I constantly ask myself this question: “What does it mean to be an American?”  Watching Black lives lost at the hands of unchecked police brutality, countless deaths from COVID-19 due to unmitigated failures in leadership, and the collapse of our severely fractured welfare state, I feel

Launching 10 Ideas 2020

Like much of this year, this launch of 10 Ideas feels unlike any other. Even before the coronavirus pandemic and economic crisis, we’ve been living in a moment eerily parallel to the time of FDR and Eleanor. Right-wing populism and oligarchy are on the rise around the globe, and vast inequality is entrenched in our

My experience with the Roosevelt Institute is linked to the person I admire most in politics: Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA). When I entered my first year of college at UCLA, I aspired to attend law school one day; public policy was not on my professional radar, and I was pessimistic about politics in general. At

During the past month, our colleagues have been sharing their analyses of the effects of COVID-19 on the economy. They’ve underscored the continued gender imbalance of labor, the racial injustice central to our economy, and the disparate impact the virus has had on different groups of our country, and they’ve provided key analysis of the

A Village Named Roosevelt

As a second-year law student at the University of Georgia School of Law, I spend most of my time poring through case law, analyzing hypotheticals, and developing my ability to advocate for marginalized and low-income clients. The foundation of these pursuits, however, was developed long ago.  I started college at the University of Georgia in

“I understood that my responsibility as a student activist wasn’t simply to call attention to what was wrong but to work diligently to make it right. And I have tried to live that life, every day” —Stacey Abrams On Saturday, January 11th, Stacey Abrams shared her hopeful wisdom with over 100 Roosevelt Network students, alumni,

In the wake of President Trump’s election in 2016, my friends and I at the George Washington University (GW) were anxious about health insurance. We worried that Trump and a Republican legislature might overturn the entire Affordable Care Act. A loss of protections allowing young people to stay on their parents’ health insurance until age

Public Goods Spring Incubator

At Roosevelt, we believe that basic public goods like education, water, health care, internet, and transportation ought to be freely and equitably accessible for all. We believe that we should have a right to influence key decisions about the provision of these goods—like their prices— through a democratic system. But today, the reality we see

At least a quarter of the 2.3 million incarcerated people in US are addicted to opioids. The fact that our criminal justice system does not routinely provide treatment for opioid withdrawal or treat addiction as a disease is at best wasteful and counterproductive. Harsh drug laws ensure that we continue to see addiction as a