In a pivotal scene in Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird, Jem Finch, brother of the novel’s protagonist, reacts in tears to the news that Tom Robinson has been found guilty of a crime he didn’t commit. “I always thought Maycomb folks were the best folks in the world,” he says, “least that’s what they

Last week, the city of Chicago joined Cleveland, Boston, Hawaii, New York City, Kansas City, and more than 100 U.S. localities in a public health feat—raising the tobacco age to 21. Chicago has taken a stand against Big Tobacco with this legislation, and the creation of a tobacco-free generation is now within reach. Since the 1964 Surgeon General’s report

Leading up to today’s primary election, North Carolina has been the focus of national discourse on the right to vote and the fundamentals of democracy. North Carolina has one of the most restrictive voter ID laws in the nation, as well as some of the most blatant gerrymandered electoral maps. Given these facts, it’s no

On the surface, COP21, the international climate change conference that started this week in Paris, appears to have all the right ingredients for building a global and equitable strategy to address climate change. The emerging messages deal directly with environmental justice—ending world poverty through the shift to a low-emission, sustainable future. Achieving such lofty goals will require a transformation of the global economy. Yet the proposed agreement fails to address some of the underlying factors leading to climate change and environmental injustice, such as economic inequality and the distribution of environmental burdens.

The University of Michigan and Michigan State University, the two largest universities in the state, together purchase more than $2 billion of goods and services each year, including everything from desks to high-powered computers. Much of this money is spent in Michigan, supporting local businesses even through tough economic times. Unfortunately, state policies have prevented U of M and MSU from fully using their purchasing power for the benefit of all of Michigan’s business owners.

Next week, global leaders in industry, government, and finance will descend on Paris for the 21st Conference of Parties (COP21) hosted by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). With a significant focus on private sector innovation, more than 25,000 delegates will aim to produce the first legally binding agreement on industrial greenhouse gas emissions, as well as financial incentives for more efficient models of sustainable growth. While it remains to be seen whether international leaders can achieve the lofty goal of legally binding yet ecologically sound carbon emission standards, what is clear is that UNFCCC forgot to invite an entire generation to this discussion table.

Andrew Lindsay, Roosevelt Institute Emerging Fellow for Equal Justice and student at Amherst College: For many students of color across the country, it is not uncommon to feel naked and constantly exposed to the elements. Subtle erasures of our bodies, slight yet sharp jabs from the ignorant, interrogations of whether or not we are deserving,

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By Cris Cambianca Across the country, food delivery service technology is developing rapidly at the same time that food delivery infrastructure is becoming increasingly interconnected. However, these innovations have not extended to systems of food recovery, or to address the substantial waste generated by these systems. Restaurants, cafeterias, and consumers throw away a lot of

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Annual Hyde Park Conference

In the past year, we’ve seen some inspiring moments: the highest Midterm turnout since 1914, felon re-enfranchisement in Florida, an overhaul of criminal justice in New York,  and progressive policies like universal basic income, the abolishment of the electoral college, free healthcare have taken a prominent role policy debates. Networks like ours must continue organizing,

Roosevelters weighed in on the first Democratic debate on #RooRxn last night. Today, Aman Banerji and Alan Smith of Roosevelt’s National Staff and Alyssa O’Brien of Roosevelt Northeast examine the issues the candidates missed. The first Democratic debate is in the books, and it was a welcome change of pace for those who, like the