Our tuition checks shouldn’t be going to pay off debts from Wall Street’s bad deals. The last few decades have not been kind to America’s local public institutions. Cities that once built state-of-the-art infrastructure are now struggling to fix potholes in the street. Public schools that were once the best in the world are lagging

The ghost of Lehman Brothers is still haunting colleges and universities around the country, continuing to extract money from institutions even though the financial firm itself is long dead. When Lehman Brothers Holdings declared bankruptcy in 2008, it was the fourth largest investment bank in the United States. The giant’s collapse was felt in all

As another presidential campaign season heats up, and candidates scrambled to create messaging, structures, and even gimmicks and swag in an attempt to engage young people, I can’t help but think about why we do what we do here at Roosevelt. Young people on college campuses are often asked to make phone calls, knock on doors,

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10 Ideas 2015

The Roosevelt Institute’s annual 10 Ideas series is the largest undergraduate policy journal, sharing locally-generated student ideas from across the country to create policy change. 10 Ideas for Education10 Ideas for Defense and Diplomacy10 Ideas for Healthcare10 Ideas for Equal Justice10 Ideas for Economic Development10 Ideas for Energy & Environment

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North Carolina continues to risk the health and economic wellbeing of its residents by refusing to use Master Settlement Agreement funds for tobacco prevention and control. Over the last 50 years, more than 20 million Americans have died prematurely as a result of smoking or exposure to second-hand smoke. In the same time period, however,

Medicaid expansion could bring relief to 190,000 uninsured North Carolinians with mental health conditions. Advocates for Medicaid expansion in North Carolina have the opportunity to add a new and urgent argument to their already robust arsenal – that Medicaid expansion will create a newly affordable option for thousands of individuals with mental health needs who

Last week, the House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate released budget proposals that include a slew of policy changes that would negatively impact young people’s ability to fully participate in the economy.   The proposals would, among many other bad ideas, freeze funding on Pell Grants for 10 years and eliminate mandatory funding for

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The Republican budget plans are causing quite a stir in the D.C. press and in Congress. However, the content of their proposals, if enacted, will ripple beyond the beltway and into states, cities, communities, and college campuses across the country – and the consequences should be of particular concern to young Americans. Rather than using

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After 114 years of educating young women in rural Virginia, Sweet Briar College recently announced that the 2015 academic year would be its last. It’s closing its doors, administrators say, because its model is no longer sustainable. There are plenty of people coming out of the woodwork to explain Sweet Briar’s problems. Dr. James F. Jones, the school’s president, claims

The Justice Department’s probe of Ferguson has revealed a troubling pattern of discrimination in traffic stops, but the problem doesn’t begin or end there. The initial findings from the Justice Department’s probe of the Ferguson, Missouri police department reveal a pattern of racial discrimination that is both broader than Ferguson and deeply rooted. Among the

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