As a first-generation immigrant and young person of color, I constantly ask myself this question: “What does it mean to be an American?”  Watching Black lives lost at the hands of unchecked police brutality, countless deaths from COVID-19 due to unmitigated failures in leadership, and the collapse of our severely fractured welfare state, I feel

For the first time in US history, the House of Representatives will vote to grant Washington, DC, full congressional representation. While press coverage has focused on the gains for Washingtonians, there are material benefits this move will bring for the rest of the country as well—especially as we address the deep wounds of institutionalized racism.

We’ve long known this: A health care system hinged on employer-sponsored insurance is unequal, inefficient, and ill-equipped for an employment crisis. Amid a global pandemic and unprecedented job loss, no one can argue this: The US’s patchwork health insurance system has needlessly imperiled the lives and economic security of many, especially our nation’s most vulnerable. 

“It looks as if the system cannot reform itself,” said Dr. Cornel West this past Friday in discussing the public murder of George Floyd on May 25. In 5 minutes and 23 seconds, Dr. West delivers the powerful—and painful—truth: We are living in a moment of compounded systemic failures, at least those of us who

The United States is facing an unprecedented public health and economic crisis: over 82,000 dead, 20.5 million jobs lost in April, and a 15 percent unemployment rate. The scale and depth of the crisis are drawing parallels to World War II mobilization and the Great Depression. In fact, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and House

Roosevelt Institute Board Member and Vice Chair Paul R. Rudd died suddenly on Tuesday, April 28, in New York. Paul joined our board in 2011 and served as chair of the Finance and Investment committee. We will deeply miss his wisdom, knowledge, and kindness, and his commitment to making the world more just and equitable.

Amidst the major health care policy differences highlighted at Tuesday’s Democratic debate, we must not forget one telling statistic: While the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has extended insurance coverage to millions, a majority of Americans who were uninsured prior to passage of the law still remain uninsured today.  Relative to the most credible forecasts from

In a report released earlier this week, Roosevelt Fellow Todd Tucker explains what industrial policy is and how we can do it better. Notably, he argues that—despite the common but mistaken assumption that the US does not use industrial policy—ad hoc and exclusionary industrial policies have hindered the kind of robust industrial planning necessary to

Also posted at the Institute for Agriculture & Trade Policy website. The Democratic primary debate on Thursday night was probably the first time that soil management—as climate policy—was ever mentioned at a primetime presidential campaign event. It was also one of the first tangible mentions of farm policy in two nights of debates. “Carbon farming”—building

The pharmaceutical industry isn’t working for most people in the US. Over 80 percent of Americans across the political spectrum believe that lowering drug costs should be a “top priority” for lawmakers and believe that prescription drug costs are “unreasonable.” This growing scrutiny presents an opportunity to question the ways that drug corporations run business, as