Last week, Senator Kamala Harris (D-CA) introduced a sweeping, bold economic policy idea: the LIFT the Middle Class Act. The LIFT (Livable Incomes for Families) Act would essentially be a dramatic expansion of the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), making it much larger and available to many more Americans. A few days later, the conservative

Recently, The New York Times published a report about women who, while working in physically demanding jobs, lost their pregnancies after requests for less-strenuous assignments were denied. The profile is a tragic example of the steep toll levied on women, and particularly women of color, who face economic and social rules that are rigged against

In today’s chaotic political environment, it’s hard to have a serious debate about economic policy, despite its deep and real impact on people’s lives. But we seem to be at a turning point as Americans look for credible answers to the economic insecurity so many of us feel. On November 13, join Roosevelt President and

We invite you to join George Washington’s Institute of Public Policy (“GWIPP”) and the Roosevelt Institute on November 13, 2018, to hear a range of experts explore the declining state of competition in high-tech industries such as social media, Internet search, and e-commerce, and propose ways to restore it. Amid concerns about the effects of corporate influence on much of

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As tuition has risen over the last several decades in the U.S., student loan debt has ballooned. Despite growing debt loads, federal policy encourages the use of loans for financing higher education, based on the assumption that student debt supports increased postsecondary attainment—and, in turn, improved outcomes for individuals and our economy as a whole.

Corporations today operate according to a model of corporate governance known as “shareholder primacy.” This theory claims that the purpose of a corporation is to generate returns for shareholders, and that decision-making should be focused on a singular goal: maximizing shareholder value. This single-minded focus—which often comes at the expense of investments in workers, innovation,

In Left Behind: Snapshots from the 21st Century Labor Market, Roosevelt Program Director Rakeen Mabud and Program Associate Jess Forden explore today’s changing economy and the future of work through the lens of six occupations: carework, food service, manufacturing, mining, nursing, and trucking. Despite a seemingly robust and healthy economy, as indicated by headline measures

Today, I am honored to step into the role of National Director of the Roosevelt Network. Nearly 15 years after the Network’s founding, we’re operating in a dysfunctional and chaotic political climate where the wealthiest and most privileged among us have consolidated power among themselves. As a result, we’re seeing the privatization of key public

Economic insecurity is a persistent reality for millions of Americans. The promise of steady, secure employment—and the fundamental relationship between employers and employees—has been eroding for decades. Wages have been stagnant since the 1970s, and the rise of contingent labor means that workers can no longer depend on employers for crucial benefits, such as health

MEDIA ADVISORY: September 26, 2018 CONTACT: Mariam Ahmed, mariam.ahmed@berlinrosen.com   STATEMENT: Roosevelt Research Director Responds to New Leadership at FTC, Elevates Revolving Door   Following the hiring of Uber’s Global Chief Competition Counsel Gail Levine to the role of deputy director of the Federal Trade Commission’s (FTC) Bureau of Competition, Marshall Steinbaum, Research Director and

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