We invite you to join George Washington’s Institute of Public Policy (“GWIPP”) and the Roosevelt Institute on November 13, 2018, to hear a range of experts explore the declining state of competition in high-tech industries such as social media, Internet search, and e-commerce, and propose ways to restore it. Amid concerns about the effects of corporate influence on much of

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As tuition has risen over the last several decades in the U.S., student loan debt has ballooned. Despite growing debt loads, federal policy encourages the use of loans for financing higher education, based on the assumption that student debt supports increased postsecondary attainment—and, in turn, improved outcomes for individuals and our economy as a whole.

Corporations today operate according to a model of corporate governance known as “shareholder primacy.” This theory claims that the purpose of a corporation is to generate returns for shareholders, and that decision-making should be focused on a singular goal: maximizing shareholder value. This single-minded focus—which often comes at the expense of investments in workers, innovation,

In Left Behind: Snapshots from the 21st Century Labor Market, Roosevelt Program Director Rakeen Mabud and Program Associate Jess Forden explore today’s changing economy and the future of work through the lens of six occupations: carework, food service, manufacturing, mining, nursing, and trucking. Despite a seemingly robust and healthy economy, as indicated by headline measures

Today, I am honored to step into the role of National Director of the Roosevelt Network. Nearly 15 years after the Network’s founding, we’re operating in a dysfunctional and chaotic political climate where the wealthiest and most privileged among us have consolidated power among themselves. As a result, we’re seeing the privatization of key public

Economic insecurity is a persistent reality for millions of Americans. The promise of steady, secure employment—and the fundamental relationship between employers and employees—has been eroding for decades. Wages have been stagnant since the 1970s, and the rise of contingent labor means that workers can no longer depend on employers for crucial benefits, such as health

MEDIA ADVISORY: September 26, 2018 CONTACT: Mariam Ahmed, mariam.ahmed@berlinrosen.com   STATEMENT: Roosevelt Research Director Responds to New Leadership at FTC, Elevates Revolving Door   Following the hiring of Uber’s Global Chief Competition Counsel Gail Levine to the role of deputy director of the Federal Trade Commission’s (FTC) Bureau of Competition, Marshall Steinbaum, Research Director and

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America’s failing antitrust system is, in large part, to blame for today’s market power problem. Lax antitrust law and enforcement have allowed troubling trends like corporate consolidation to remain unchallenged, further embedding our skewed economy. In highly consolidated markets, consumers have limited choice and little power to pick their price, quality, or provider for the

The State of U.S. Antitrust Law

On Friday, September 21, Roosevelt Chief Economist Joseph E. Stiglitz provided opening remarks at the ongoing Federal Trade Commission (FTC) hearings regarding competition and consumer protection in the 21st century. Professor Stiglitz called for a new antitrust standard, as outlined in an upcoming report co-authored by Roosevelt Research Director and Fellow Marshall Steinbaum. Watch the keynote here and

The Year of the Woman, Again

For Women’s Review of Books, Roosevelt Senior Fellow Ellen Chesler reviews International Women’s Year: The Greatest Consciousness-Raising Event in History. Authored by Duke University historian Jocelyn Olcott, International Women’s Year “adds substantially to the historiography of women on a global stage,” writes Chesler. By examining the first international conference of women, Olcott rectifies the event’s historically biased portrayal and champions it

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