Alex Hertel-Fernandez, a Roosevelter and Harvard PhD student, estimates that: somewhere between 3 percent and 10 percent of all US employees — about 4 to 14 million Americans — are experiencing intimidating forms of political contact at work. Read more about his research here.

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Senator Elizabeth Warren joined the celebration of the Network’s tenth anniversary in December 2015, writing “For the past 10 years you have… helped shape the brightest young minds of this generation.”

Interview with Matthew Fischler ’10 and Rahul Rekhi ‘13 Roosevelt alums in Forbes 30 Under 30 for Law & Policy 2015 Interviewed by Joe McManus, Special Initiatives Director This transcript has been edited for length and clarity. Joe McManus: How did you first get involved in Roosevelt? Rahul Rekhi: I reached out to Rajiv Narayan,

Roosevelter, Elizabeth Chi (Cornell ’18) published an Op-ed in the Cornell daily sun advocating for Cornell President Elizabeth Garrett to take action on climate change. Therefore, the question is not whether Cornell should set an administrative precedent, but rather whether the fight against fossil fuel companies that exploit and pollute water and land resources from

An aggressive blueprint for rewriting 35 years of policies that…have led to a vast concentration of wealth among the richest Americans and an increasingly squeezed middle class. –New York Times Rewriting the Rules of the American Economy builds on the Roosevelt Institute’s report, which was released earlier this year. It has influenced and changed the

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The discussion over a Too Big To Fail (TBTF) subsidy, where the largest banks are able to borrow more cheaply as the result of potential future bailouts, is back in the discussion. Paul Krugman referenced it with a link to my review of two studies arguing the subsidy has largely declined since the crisis. Dean Baker has responded with critical thoughts on the studies.

My point isn’t to say that the subsidy is completely over. Nor, as I’ll explain in a bit, is it to say that TBTF is over. Instead, understanding this decline lets us know we should push forward with what we are doing. It debunks conservative narratives about Dodd-Frank being fundamentally a protective permanent bailout for the largest firms that we should scrap, and provides evidence against repealing it. And ideally it gets us to understand this subsidy as just one part of the more general TBTF problem that needs to be solved.

I’ll first respond to Dean Baker. Then I’ll map out four different ways of understanding what we mean by a TBTF subsidy, and what is and isn’t fixed, because that might clarify other responses I’ve been getting.

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Reporter Joey Bunch cites Roosevelt @ U of Denver as a student voice in the conversation leading up to the GOP Debate in Colorado. He interviews chapter president, Morgan Smith. Smith, an unaffiliated voter and president of the nonpartisan Roosevelt Institute chapter at DU, cited as an example student loans, a $1.3 trillion burden for

A remarkable thing happened: one of the largest banks slimmed down just a bit because of Dodd-Frank’s capital requirements. It’s another piece of evidence that the core parts are working, and if scaled up could make a dramatic structural change in the financial system. In July, the Federal Reserve finalized its rule on the special

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Aman Banerji argues that the confluence of strong movements and a sense of collective responsibility has created an opportunity for criminal justice reform. We have a truly unique opportunity to rewrite the rules of criminal justice and transform the manner in which we view prisoners, treating them as citizens and human beings. The early ’70s

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Roosevelt Fellow Saqib Bhatti talked with Bloomberg after the city of Chicago announced that it would need to pay at least $270 million to get out swap deals the city had entered. Meanwhile the city is facing a significant tax increase to cover a budget shortfall. We’re paying these fees at the same time the

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