Andrew Lindsay, Roosevelt Institute Emerging Fellow for Equal Justice and student at Amherst College: For many students of color across the country, it is not uncommon to feel naked and constantly exposed to the elements. Subtle erasures of our bodies, slight yet sharp jabs from the ignorant, interrogations of whether or not we are deserving,

Tagged under:

Following a trip to Washington DC, Upasna Saha of Roosevelt @ Columbia reflects on the challenges of policy making: Ultimately, the future of policy depends on what it has always needed: passionate people with a variety of political allegiances, with knowledge of specific issues and the inner workings of the process. Passion may have become

Corporate short-termism—also known as “quarterly capitalism”—has become a key issue in the 2016 election. It’s also one of the major economic trends that has been increasing inequality and weakening economic growth for the last 35 years. So what is it, how has it transformed American business, and what can we do about it? In our Agenda

Connecticut College features Margaret Sturtevant’s policy of the year on their website: “It’s one thing to sit at a computer and construct this ideal world where everything will fall into place like it should, but that is never going to actually happen. For a policy to serve the community, you’ve got to work with the

By Cris Cambianca Across the country, food delivery service technology is developing rapidly at the same time that food delivery infrastructure is becoming increasingly interconnected. However, these innovations have not extended to systems of food recovery, or to address the substantial waste generated by these systems. Restaurants, cafeterias, and consumers throw away a lot of

Tagged under:

With so much attention on short-termism these days, I’m excited to announce the Roosevelt Institute’s Financialization Project is launching two papers this Friday, November 6th, in Washington DC.

The first paper is from J.W. Mason, and it is an answer to the three most common criticisms about this topic. Namely, it isn’t happening, it is happening but is great for growth, and that it may not be great but it’s appropriate and even necessary. J.W. push back on all three. (Sneak previews of his responses to the first and second issue are already floating out there.)

The second is from me, J.W. Mason and Amanda Page-Hongrajook, and it’s a ten point policy agenda to combat short-termism. The points are broad, focusing on everything from pension guarantees to regulation of stock exchanges, but story is simple: the agenda needs to focus on building countervailing power when it comes to the strength of short-term interest holders.

I’m looking forward to sharing these with you, and I hope they move the debate forward on this crucial but still understudied and underdeveloped area. To RSVP, please contact Eric Bernstein


Event Details

On Friday, November 6, please join Roosevelt Institute Fellows Mike Konczal and J.W. Mason, with keynote speaker Senator Tammy Baldwin and moderator Jim Tankersley of The Washington Post, at the National Press Club as we release two papers on corporate short–termism. Opening remarks by Senator Baldwin will be followed by a panel with Cornell University’s Lynn Stout and the AFL-CIO’s Heather Slavkin Corzo.

An Agenda to End Short–Termism
Location: National Press Club
529 14th Street Northwest, Washington, D.C.
Breakfast will be available at 8:30 a.m.,
with the program to begin promptly at 8:50 a.m.

Rising shareholder payouts and declining investment have touched off widespread concern and debate about the corporate focus on short-term profits over long-term growth. In this set of papers, Mike Konczal proposes a broad policy agenda for curbing short–termism and J.W. Mason presents new research showing the depth of the problem and addressing common critiques.

To RSVP, please contact Eric Bernstein.

Tagged under:

In an op-ed for CNBC, Roosevelt Institute President and CEO Felicia Wong said the Republican presidential candidates missed a big opportunity to connect with middle- and working-class voters at their third debate in Denver: The not-so-secret truth is that Republican voters want something different than what the candidates are proposing; they want deep structural changes

Tagged under:

Roosevelt @ Denver University chapter head Morgan Smith responded to the second GOP debate in the Denver Post: The only question that had real direct impact to young people was about the student debt burden. Both Gov. Kasich and Gov. Bush, who answered it, focused on mitigating the costs of universities and alternative ways to

Joelle Gamble on the importance of addressing policy proposals in the second GOP debate: From our survey, we know that young people have a set of policy priorities they want candidates to cover in an economic debate. Young people are concerned about economic inequality and the ever-increasing role of the financial sector in our economy.

Tagged under: ,

It’s all fun and games until someone gets elected. When Jeb Bush’s proposed $100 billion tax cut for the top 1 percent was followed by Donald Trump’s $1 trillion dollar annual reduction, and then by Ben Carson’s call for biblical taxation, I was amused. It’s not that I take taxes lightly; it’s just that the various Republican candidates’ plans seemed too