Structural problems in the health care and hospital industries are specifically hurting women in rural America, both as patients and as workers. In a new Roosevelt issue brief, Andrea Flynn, Rakeen Mabud, and Emma Chessen explore some of the industry-wide shifts that have occurred in rural areas over the last several decades. They then describe the

Despite Big Pharma’s claim that high-cost medicines are the price society must pay for innovation, recent research provides ample evidence that overpriced medicines are not necessary for the industry to find cures or revolutionize. Rather, high-cost and low-quality medicines are the price patients pay for an industry that prioritizes profit-seeking over public health. Like all

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Without bold, visionary action to address race- and gender-based wealth inequities, the chasm between those who are economically secure and those who are not—mainly Black, brown, and Native American communities and women—will continue to grow. In the end, these issues threaten our nation’s ability to finally achieve our promise of freedom, dignity, and security for

In “The Cost of Capture: How the Pharmaceutical Industry Has Corrupted Policymakers and Harmed Patients,” Roosevelt Fellow Julie Margetta Morgan and Advocacy Associate Devin Duffy explore how drug companies influence policymakers and what this means for patients, the American health care system, and our economy. One of a series on Big Pharma, this issue brief

The US needs an economy that is grounded in justice and morality, where everyone, free of undue resource constraints, can prosper. To achieve this, citizens ought to have universal access to economic rights, such as the right to employment, medical and health care, high-quality education, and sound banking and financial services. Currently, our system provides

The US economy suffers from a market power problem that has invaded many sectors, including health care, telecommunications, and technology. As firms become more powerful, they are able to profit by taking advantage of other economic stakeholders rather than growing the overall economic pie. Competition as America once knew it—firms working to provide better goods

Workers are increasingly powerless in today’s economy. The decades-long assault on the voice and agency of American workers continues to erode their position under employers: Declining unionization rates, the proliferation of noncompete and arbitration clauses, and outsized employer power plague labor markets today. Additionally, an increasingly fissured workplace is yet one more challenge our most

From unaffordable housing, to lack of access to higher education and health care, to extreme income and wealth inequality, to the existential crisis of climate change, the US faces many urgent problems that call for a substantially expanded, more active public sector. The question, however, is always: How do we pay for it? In “Fiscal

Companies today are not working the way that most Americans, policymakers, or the media think that they do. To fight inequality, we need to rewrite the laws that guide corporations. We must first, however, change the way that people understand the role of the American firm in our economy and explore how we can deploy

The pharmaceutical industry isn’t working for most people in the US. Over 80 percent of Americans across the political spectrum believe that lowering drug costs should be a “top priority” for lawmakers and believe that prescription drug costs are “unreasonable.” This growing scrutiny presents an opportunity to question the ways that drug corporations run business, as