Today’s dominant story, told by the Federal Reserve, the media, and many prominent economists, is that the economy has recovered from the recession and is growing about as fast as it can without overheating. This outlook has led the Fed to increase interest rates four times since December 2015, ending the historically low rates it

Our debate about what is possible in U.S. policy is severely constrained by the assumption that our public resources are scarce and already overspent, meaning we are not capable of the large-scale social investments needed to provide every American with income security and a dignified life. This assumption is misguided and false. Implementing tax policies

Block granting is the process of redirecting federal funds to states, which then have sole control over how that money is allocated. States can lift federal restrictions on how the money should be spent. This policy choice can have deeply pernicious effects and often serves as a back door for slashing the budgets of social

The global economic and political order that was created in the aftermath of World War II is under attack by President Trump. That order has been of enormous benefit to the entire world. The international institutions and arrangements that have been created the last seventy years have, I believe, played an important role in these

In 2010, the year President
 Obama signed the Affordable Care Act (ACA) into law, nearly
 50 million individuals in the United States
were uninsured—more than 16 percent
of the total population. Since then, the ACA has extended care to more than 20 million Americans. ACA repeal would hurt millions of people who now have access to health

For over a hundred years, competition policy has been a central part of a market economy’s legal framework. Over the past third of a century, however, the scope and effectiveness of competition policy has been narrowed, under the influence of certain ideas about the functioning of the market economy—ideas which have subsequently been widely discredited

In “The Threat of Privatization for the Emerging Generation” below, Roosevelt’s Joelle Gamble and Aman Banerji, document the rise of Privatization- the process through which basic public goods such as water, education, and energy, are sold off to the private sector in the name of efficiency and cost reduction for taxpayers. They argue that the

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As large firms like AT&T continue to explore methods of cementing their hold on their respective industries, regulators must proactively identify opportunities for anticompetitive abuses of market power in the 21st century economy. To this end, it is imperative that the Antitrust Division of the Department of Justice and the Federal Trade Commission abandon the

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An election night survey conducted by Democracy Corps on behalf of the Roosevelt Institute finds that Roosevelt’s Rewriting the Rules message—that inequality is a choice, and that we can rewrite the rules to level the playing field and grow the economy—is a winner with voters, who strongly favor a call for bold action over the messages they heard

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Some call it a “basic income.” Others call it a “guaranteed minimum income.” Whatever you call it, the idea of providing direct cash payments to citizens has come in and out of vogue for at least 60 years in the United States. In recent years, however, driven by declining job security and the stagnant pay of