This brief is part 4 in a series on the Trans-Pacific Partnership. Click here to view the rest of the briefs. With few people buying the argument that the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), a sweeping trade and investment agreement between the United States and 11 Pacific Rim countries, will bring more jobs and higher wages, proponents

This brief is part 3 in a series on the Trans-Pacific Partnership. Click here to view the rest of the briefs. President Obama has said that “no challenge poses a greater threat to future generations than climate change.” Yet the word “climate” is conspicuously missing from the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP). Worse, many provisions of the

This brief is part 2 of a series on the Trans-Pacific Partnership. Click here to view the rest of the briefs. If the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) is enacted, multinational investors will be able to sue the United States and other host country governments in private international arbitration (investor–state dispute settlement, or ISDS) when they feel

This brief is part 1 of a series on the Trans-Pacific Partnership. Click here to view the rest of the briefs. While advocates promote the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) as a “free trade” agreement between the United States and 11 Pacific Rim countries, the most economically significant provisions are not cuts to trade barriers. Instead, the

In a series of briefs, Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow and Chief Economist Joseph Stiglitz analyzes the ins and outs of the proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership, explaining why it would structure the rules in ways that would harm the economy and American workers. View the briefs below: Part 1: Beware of TPP’s Investor–State Dispute Settlement Provision Part

Over the last 40 years, corporate influence and trickle-down ideology have pervaded the tax code, resulting in large tax breaks for corporations and the wealthy. These low rates have failed to deliver the widespread growth that was promised, and the results for the typical American have been disastrous: Wealth at the top skyrocketed with no

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Is the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) broken? Yes. But does that mean it is irrelevant for workers attempting to organize? No. As data in this paper shows, particularly when focused on certain demographic groups, labor unions are still using the NLRB, and in many cases, very effectively. This paper examines the use of the NLRB election process since 2000,

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More than 50 years since passage of the landmark 1964 Civil Rights Act, the little progress we have made as a country in ending job segregation by race and gender has stalled. As women and people of color make up a growing majority of America’s workforce, we must find new and innovative solutions to ending workplace

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We have a wage theft epidemic in our country, especially in the low-wage labor market, where too many workers are cheated out of their fair pay. There are many factors that contribute to the wage theft epidemic, from woefully under-resourced public enforcement agencies, to inadequate anti-retaliation protections for workers who come forward to enforce their

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This paper explores a new strategy for workplace-based worker organizations. The strategy is suggested by the contrast between the U.S. system of work regulation, in which regulations are administered by a number of different agencies, each with a relatively narrow jurisdiction, and the system prevailing in Southern Europe and Latin America, where a single agency administers the

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