Our debate about what is possible in U.S. policy is severely constrained by the assumption that our public resources are scarce and already overspent, meaning we are not capable of the large-scale social investments needed to provide every American with income security and a dignified life. This assumption is misguided and false. Implementing tax policies

In response to the 2007-08 Financial Crisis that cost the United States more than $20 trillion, Congress passed the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act on July 21, 2010 with the aim of overhauling the dysfunctional regulatory regime. In the years since, the wide-reaching reforms mandated by Dodd-Frank have provided key protections to

Among all social groups in the United States, women of color experience some of the starkest disparities, inequities, and injustices across nearly every social and economic indicator. Compared with white women, women of color have higher levels of unemployment and poverty; they have significantly less wealth; they are more likely to be targeted by and

Providing cash directly to individuals has often been met with criticism, suspicion, and fear: the thinking goes that people who need financial assistance are not to be trusted, as their financial position reflects a moral failing rather than a societal one. These objections to cash transfer programs are rooted more in myth than empirical evidence.

The United States is currently facing two ominous threats: climate change and economic and social inequality. The climate movement has made enormous headway in highlighting the connections between the two, but we must go even deeper if we hope to make progress on both fronts. The objective of Boiling Points: The Inextricable Links Between Inequality

Social scientists have traditionally struggled to identify clear links between political spending and congressional voting, and many journalists have embraced their skepticism. A giant stumbling block has been the challenge of measuring the labyrinthine ways money flows from investors, firms, and industries to particular candidates. Ferguson, Jorgensen, and Chen directly tackle that classic problem in

10 Ideas 2017: Report

At the Roosevelt Institute, we understand the importance and value of young people’s ideas, and we’re actively working with a new generation of leaders committed to fighting for their vision. Our oldest and most competitive policy journal, 10 Ideas, promotes that work by elevating the top student-generated policy proposals from across the country. The 10

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U.S. foreign policy and the need to cultivate international alliances increasingly conflict with U.S. domestic politics, particularly with regard to trade. The 2016 election featured an outgoing Democratic administration insisting the Trans-Pacific Partnership was the U.S.’s last hope to show its commitment to the Asia-Pacific, a Republican candidate blaming it and other trade deals for

The Trump administration and House Republicans are proposing a massive tax cut for corporations and the 1 percent. They falsely claim the Brady-Ryan tax plan will increase investment, reverse outsourcing, and create jobs, but this is just more of their failed “trickle-down” ideology. In this report, we argue that the evidence shows another corporate tax cut

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American workers are facing a lack of power that has reached crisis levels. In addition to the decades long decline of unions, the expanded use of technology and outsourcing pose challenges from which contemporary labor law offers no shelter. This situation is poised to worsen in the near future, as Trump administration appointments to the