FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: September 25, 2018 CONTACT: Mariam Ahmed, mariam.ahmed@berlinrosen.com   NEW REPORTS: REVIVING ANTITRUST FOR THE 21ST CENTURY ECONOMY Roosevelt Institute and Great Democracy Initiative Release Legislative Blueprint for Combating the Second Gilded Age   NEW YORK, NY – As concentrated corporate power threatens jobs and wages and worsens inequality, the Roosevelt Institute and

The State of U.S. Antitrust Law

On Friday, September 21, Roosevelt Chief Economist Joseph E. Stiglitz provided opening remarks at the ongoing Federal Trade Commission (FTC) hearings regarding competition and consumer protection in the 21st century. Professor Stiglitz called for a new antitrust standard, as outlined in an upcoming report co-authored by Roosevelt Research Director and Fellow Marshall Steinbaum. Watch the keynote here and

Since the 1970s, America’s antitrust policy regime has been weakening and market power has been on the rise. High market concentration—in which few firms compete in a given market—is one indicator of market power. From 1985 to 2017, the number of mergers completed annually rose from 2,308 to 15,361 (IMAA 2017). Recently, policymakers, academics, and

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: June 12 2018 CONTACT: Alexander Tucciarone, atucciarone@rooseveltinstitute.org, 516-263-9775   STATEMENT: THE ROOSEVELT INSTITUTE RESPONDS TO VERDICT IN AT&T-TIME WARNER MERGER TRIAL   NEW YORK, NY– In response to Judge Richard Leon’s verdict in the Department of Justice (DOJ) Antitrust Division’s lawsuit to block the merger of AT&T and Time Warner, Roosevelt Institute

Following decades of lax antitrust enforcement, the airline sector today suffers from a market power problem. Fewer firms means there is less competition, which is great for corporate profits but bad for consumers and other stakeholders. In “Airline Consolidation, Merger Retrospectives, and Oil Price Pass-Through,” Roosevelt Research Director Marshall Steinbaum studies the last 10 years

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Since the 1970s, America’s antitrust policy regime has been weakening and market power has been on the rise. High market concentration—in which fewer firms exist in a given market—is one troubling symptom and cause of market power. From 1985 to 2017, we saw an increase in the annual number of mergers from 2,308 to 15,361.

The American economy no longer functions to the benefit of American workers. Despite record profits and increased productivity, wages have been stagnant. In fact, despite being 75 percent more productive in 2016 than in 1973, the average worker earned just 12 percent more. An emerging body of research chronicles the extent of labor market monopsony—where

MEDIA ADVISORY: March 29, 2018 CONTACT: Alexander Tucciarone, atucciarone@rooseveltinstitute.org, 516-263-9775   New Report from the Roosevelt Institute: Rampant Market Power of Corporations Responsible for Rigging the Economy Against American Workers and Consumers, Harming Communities New York, NY — Earlier this week, the Roosevelt Institute released its latest report, Powerless: How Lax Antitrust and Concentrated Market Power Rig

Today, the Roosevelt Institute released Powerless: How Lax Antitrust and Concentrated Market Power Rig the Economy Against American Workers, Consumers, and Communities, a report I wrote with my colleagues Eric Harris Bernstein and John Sturm. In this report, we catalog the growing body of evidence that strongly supports our view that the economy is afflicted

As workers, as consumers, and as citizens, Americans are increasingly powerless in today’s economy. A 40-year assault on antitrust and competition policy—the laws and regulations meant to guard against the concentration of power in private hands—has tipped the economy in favor of powerful corporations and their shareholders. Under the false assumption that the unencumbered ambitions